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Full text of "Annual Report of the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Library and Report of Librarian"

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3 a^si) 120 



V 



Darvarb collede Xfbrarig 

FROM 

...^,.^*^.,.«**, 




»*■•■ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



AND 



V^plifueatc cf ztie 



'"b"»rt«n. 



tp8 /l9?eles public library. 



^^£^S^ EXCHANCJ- 



1 



i^ \ 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRSRY. 



DIRECTORS. 

G. A. DoBiNSON, President. 
H. Jay Hanchettk. Frank H. Howard, 
E. W. Jones. J. Mills Davies. 



COMMITTEES. 

Books and Donations. 
Messrs. G. A. Dobinson, H. Jay Hanchette, 

Frank H. Howard. 

Rules and Administration. 
Messrs. E. W. Jones, J. Mills Davies, G. A. Dobinson. 

Printing and Supplies. 
Messrs. Frank H. Howard, E. W. Jones, G. A. Dobinson. 

Auditing and Accounts. 
Messrs. J. Mills Davies, G. A. Dobinson, 

H. Jay Hanchette. 



Miss Tessa L. Kelso, Librarian. 
Miss Jessie A. Gavitt, First Assistant. 

Attendants: 
Miss Addis Hasse, Miss Estella Haines, 

Miss Lena B. Fenner, Mrs. E. A. Wellman. 



REPORT 



OF THB 



Board of Directors 



or TMB 



JLos Angeles Public Library. 



Oecember 4tli, 1880. 



To the Honorable^ the City Council of the City of Los 
Angeles : 

Gbntlbmsn: — The Board of Directors of the Los An- 
geles Public Library has the honor to transmit to your 
Honorable Body its Annual Report, as follows, in accordance 
with the requirements of Sub. 17, Sec. 58, Art. IV., of the 
Charter of the City of Los Angeles. 

To begin with a short resum^ of the history of the insti- 
tution committed to our care, we may state that the nucleus 
of the present Library was formed in December, 1872, by a 
voluntary association of citizens, who elected a Board of 
thirteen Trustees to manage its affairs, viz : 



8 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Gov. J. G. Downey, S. B. Caswell, H. K. W. Bent, 
Col. G. H. Smith, Judge Sepulveda, W. H. Mace, A. W. 
Potts, T. W. Temple, R. H. Dalton, Gen. Geo. Stoneman, 
W. B. Lawlor, Gen. McConnell and Harris Newmark. 

These gentlemen and their successors in office managed the 
affairs of the Library for nearly six years under the title of 
** Los Angeles Library Association," a small stock of books 
being obtained, partly from proceeds of the life membership 
fees and partly from monthly dues. 

J. C. Littlefield was the first Librarian, at a salary of 
$75 per month, which was soon increased to $ioo. 

In April, 1878, the members of the organization voted 
unanimously to dissolve the Association under an agreement 
with the City, by virtue of which the City Council took pos- 
session of their property, valued at $3,134.25, and assumed 
liabilities amounting to $1,074.25, and the Library from that 
date was known as the "Los Angeles Public Library," 
under the provisions of the special act passed by the Legisla- 
ture for that purpose. 

In January, 1879, under the provisions of the Revised 
Charter, the members of the Council, fifteen in number, 
with the Mayor as Chairman, became a permanent Board of 
Regents for the management of the institution. P. Connolly 
was elected in January, 1879, ^^ Librarian, to succeed J. C. 
Littlefield. 

The record affords very meagre information as to the 
progress of the Library and the amount of patronage it 
received, but in October, 1879, we find that upon strong 
representations made to the Board, the sum of $250 was 



LOS ANGELBS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9 

appropriated for the purchase of books, which was followed 
by a further appropriation of $150 in June, 1880. 

In June, 1880, Miss Mary £. Foy was elected Librarian. 

In January, 1883, the Mayor in his message recommended 
" the expenditure of at least $1,000 during the coming year 
for the purchase of books." 

In January, 1884, Miss Jessie A. Gavitt was elected Li- 
brarian, to succeed Miss Foy. and held the office until Janu- 
ary, 1889, when she was succeeded by Mrs. Lydia A. Pres- 
cott, who held office for a few months until the first of April 
following, when the present Board of Directors was appointed 
under the provisions of the New Charter, and they appointed 
Miss Tessa L. Kelso as Principal Librarian, and Miss Jessie 
A. Gavitt as First Assistant. 

For the period of ten years dating from the time when 
the Library management passed into the hands of the Coun- 
cil as a Board of Regents in 1879, up to the organization of 
the present Board of Directors, very little interest seems to 
have been taken by anyone in the development of the in- 
stitution as a means of public good, the records showing that 
the stated meetings were not attended as they should have 
been ; the chief business done at any time being mostly to 
audit the claims for salaries, rent and other expenses. The 
remarkable increase in the prosperity and population of Los 
Angeles, brought with it no advantage to the Public Library ; 
every one being too busy to waste time upon anything but 
real estate speculations. After the subsidence of this ex- 
citement, and when the present Board took office, it did so 
with the determination to create, if possible, a public interest 



TO REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

in the Library and to make it, as it desetves to be, an attrac- 
tion of which our city may well be proud. In this endeavor 
it has been largely helped by the co-operation of your Hon- 
orable Body, and we have now the satisfaction of seeing the 
Library located in spacious, well lighted and airy rooms, 
which have been furnished throughout with library fittings of 
the most improved designs and constructed of the best possi- 
ble material. 

The stock of books brought from the old Library quar- 
ters in Downey Block, last July, was not only small, but illy 
adapted to the needs of a community like ours. This Board 
recognizes that a generous allowance was made for the Li- 
brary from the Tax Fund of 1889-90, but when that amount 
is expended there will yet be a shortage of about 10,000 vol- 
umes which must be purchased before there can be a free 
circulation of books for home use. The Library at the pres- 
ent time is practically free, there being no charge made for 
the use of it, but only a small fee of one dollar per quarter 
for the privilege of using books at home. 

The Board is of opinion, based on an examination of 
the records of this and other libraries, that it will be impossi- 
ble to supply the immense demand for books which would 
immediately arise if the small charge now made were 
abolished, and that it will not be prudent to do away with 
such charge until the Library contains at least 20,000 vol- 
umes for circulation, independent of those to be kept in the 
Library for reference purposes. 

For the statistics and general information about the Li- 
brary since it has been under its present management, we 
beg to refer to the able report of Miss Kelso, the Librarian ^ 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. II 

which is attached hereto, marked * 'Appendix A," and is 
hereby made a part of this report. The statistics and infor- 
mation contained therein are well worthy of attentive con- 
sideration by your Honorable Body. 

The Board is endeavoring to administer the a^airs of 
the Library with such due regard to economy as is consistent 
with a good return for the money expended. In studying 
the question of expense it must be borne in mind that the 
Library, being open for twelve and a half hours every week 
day, and the hours of labor for each person employed being 
limited by law to eight, the working staff necessarily costs 
something over 50 per cent, above the amount that would be 
required if the rooms were only open for a day of legal 
length. 

The Library is now kept open every week day in the 
year from 9 a. m. to 9:30 p. m., and on Sundays the reading 
room is open from i p. m. to 6 p. m. 

The Board has made the use of the Library entirely free 
to all the teachers in the Public Schools, and is glad to report 
to your Honorable Body that the extensive use made of this 
accommodation, is an evidence of the benefit it will become 
to the cause of education. 

Although the present staff of employees have not been 
long engaged in working under the present administration 
the Board takes this opportunity to express its satisfaction 
with the zeal and energy thus far displayed. The Board has 
been greatly assisted in its arduous work by the ability and 
experience of the Librarian, who has shown a capacity and 
intelligence which make her remarkably well fitted for the 
important position she occupies. The introduction of the 



12 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

latest improvements in library arrangements, and the adop- 
tion of the best labor-saving devices in library economy are 
owing to Miss Kelso's knowledge and good judgment in 
those matters. She has been ably seconded by her chief 
assistant, whose local acquaintance has been of g^eat advan- 
tage to the Library. 

In conclusion the Board desires to express that feeling of 
gratitude to your Honorable Body which consists of a lively 
sense of favors to come. The needs of the Public Library 
for a city of the size and importance of Los Angeles, with its 
population of 80,000 souls, have thus far been appreciated 
by you, but much remains to be done in the future. The 
remarkable increase in the demands upon the Library during 
the few months it has been actively in operation, point to a 
larger increase in the immediate future, the growth of the 
facilities stimulating the growth of the demand. In the opinion 
of this Board it will not be long before the present quarters, 
ample as they now seem, will be too small in which to con- 
duct the business. We therefore ask your Honorable Body 
to have in mind the necessity for making such provision for 
a Public Library as will be sufficient for all time, and to this 
end the appropriation of a lot and separate building will be 
found to be indispensable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. A. DoBiNSON, President. 
H. Jay Hanchette. 
F. H. Howard. 
E. W. Jones. 
J. Mills Davies. 



•» A M 



APPENDIX 'A. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public 
Library: 

Gentlemen — ^I herewith respectfully submit the annual 
report of the Los Angeles Public Library, which covers a 
period of eight months, dating from April ist, to December 
ist, 1889. 

The income of the Library is derived from a ^^tax levy 
on all taxable property in the city, not to exceed five cents on 
each one hundred dollars of the value of all real and personal 
property," and from book borrowers' dues, at the rate of one 
dollar per quarter. 

Following is a statement of the receipts and expenditures 
for the period named : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand April ist, 1889 $ 3,594.62 

Balance from tax levy of 1888-89 288.40 

(Transferred April ist, 1889.) 
Received on account of apportionment for fiscal 

year 1889-90 i7i026. 18 

Dues and Fines 519926 

Total ^ $21,428.46 



14 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



EXPENDITURES. 

Books and Periodicals $ 3,540.89 

Library Expenses 2,233.60 

Salaries *. 2,632.08 

Balance in hands of City Treasurer 13,021.89 

Total $21,428.46 

The amount apportioned by the City Council for the 
fiscal year of 1889-90 was $18,303.05, of which sum it was 
conditioned that at least $10,000 was to be expended for the 
purchase of books. 

The figures showing the usefulness and history of the 
Library are necessarily very incomplete, since three months 
of the eight were spent in the old quarters, where it was 
impossible to keep correct records of circulation or attend- 
ance, under the system then in use. 

Upon removal into the present quarters in the new City 
Hall the Library was closed for a period of two months, 
during which time the books were cleaned, repaired, counted, 
classified, numbered, book plates inserted, placed in position, 
shelf catalogued in duplicate, and a card catalogfue begun. 

On Monday, the 2d of September, the new Library was 
opened to the public, completely and elaborately fitted with 
new furnishings in its mechanical make up. 



los angeles public library. 1 5 

The Book Account is as follows : 

Number of volumes in the Library, September 

2(1, 1889 6,356 

Number of volumes added to Library to Decem- 
ber ist, 18S9 4>77i 

Total I i?i27 

Discarded 98 

Lost and stolen i 

99 

Number of volumes in Library Dec. ist, 1889 11,028 

The large addition to the Library during the past three 
months, as shown in the foregoing figures, namely, 4,771 
volumes, is being daily supplemented by the arrival of other 
books purchased by the Board. 

In all such purchases due regard has been paid to the 
needs of the Library in the different departments of History 
and Travels, Biography, Literature, Fine Arts, Natural Sci- 
ence, Philology, Fiction, Sociology, Theology, Philosophy 
and Reference, and the fund is being expended in proportion 
to the importance of the several classes named. 

There are one hundred and eighty-nine periodicals re- 
ceived in the Library, which are apportioned as follows : 

On file in Reading Rooms 78 

On file at Delivery Desk 73 

For use at home 38 



1 6 REPORT OP BOARD OK DIRECTORS 

The circulation of books and periodicals for the three 
months from September 2d to December ist is given below: 

Se^tembtr^ October, November. Totals, 

Reading Rooms .3,418 3,570 4,651 11,639 

Home 1 1415 2,277 2,610 6,302 

Total ^ 4,833 5,847 7,261 17,941 

in addition to this registered number of applications at 
the delivery desk, there is an average daily attendance of 
over one hundred readers who make use of the periodicals on 
file in the Reading Rooms, making the total number 29,941, 
which, allowing for natural increase, at a moderate estimate 
of 10 per cent, will give a grand total of 131,740 'readers for 
the year. 

In re-arranging the Library the Dewey system of Classi- 
fication has been very closely followed. The addition of so 
many new books making it inadvisable to publish finding 
lists, type written shelf sheets of the di^erent classes were 
inserted in neat covers, lettered with class and number, e,g, : 
•'Class 920, Biography," etc., and have proved to be quite 
satisfactory as a temporary substitute for the finding list It 
has also been the means of impressing the scheme of classifi- 
cation upon the minds of the readers' in a remarkable degree ; 
in fact the use of these sheets bound in this manner will be 
an important training for the intelligent use of the card 
catalogue. 

The circulation of periodicals for home use has proven 
to be one of the most satisfactory features of the Library. 
First-class periodicals suggesting and creating a demand for 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 1 7 

a better class of books, and accomplishing much toward 
counteracting the excessive percentage of fiction read. 

The addition of a very complete collection of excellent 
photographs of famous paintings, sculptures, architectural 
subjects, etc., promises to become of the highest importance 
as a part of the education of the pupils of the Public Schools 
aside from the advantages to the general public. 

Add to this the library of vocal and instrumental music 
now being formed, and our community will find in the Li- 
brary a means of culture and convenience that will in a great 
measure compensate for the disadvantage of being so far 
geographically removed from the great supply centers. 

Among the accessions of the Library are thirteen hun- 
dred volumes of U. S. Public Documents, in which there is 
a rich fund of information bearing upon the interests and his- 
tory of our section of the country. It is our aim to classify 
and index these volumes to the degree of usefulness that 
their importance warrants. 

Our reference department has been enriched by the 
acquisition of very many complete sets of the leading 
American and English periodicals, which, with Poole's index 
to the same alone afford the public a mine of information 
equal to that of any ordinary reference library. 

That our citizens are awakening to the importance of 
having a good Library in their midst is apparent from the in- 
terest expressed and in the increased apportionment for its 
support, and it is regretted that a report at this time can give 
but a meagre idea of how well founded this realization is. 



1 8 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

As an evidence of the faithfulness of the sta^ of em 
ployees, I need only to draw your attention to the fact that 
within the past three months four thousand seven hundred 
and seventy- one volumes have been added to the Library in 
addition to answering the demands created by thousands of 
readers. 

TESSA L. KELSO, 

Librarian, 

Los Angeles, Cal., Dec. 3, 1889. 




LISI" OR DONATIONS 



TO THS 



Los Anoeles Public Library 

From April isi to December ist^ i88g. 



Adam, Very Rev. J 

Alameda, (>d., Public Library 

Bangor, Me^ Public Library 

Bengough, Elizabeth 

Hoeton, Mai»^ Public Library 

Brooklyn, N. i., Mercantile Library 

Chalmers & Williams 

Cincinnati, O., Public Libraxy 

Dobinson, G. A 

Dunkelbc^ger, Col. L R. 

Donn, Poindexter 

Famsworth, B. L 

Flint, A. 

Fremont, Mrs. Jessie Benton 

Grand Kapids, Mich., Public School 

Library 

Hamburger, A. & Sons 

Hanchette, H. Jay 

Hartford, K. L, Library Association 

Howard, Frank H 

Hughes, Mrs. £ 

Kean, H. A. & Co 

King, W. B „ 

Liudlev, Hervey 

Maddrill, J. W 

Milwaukee Public Library 

Mortimer, C. White 

Omaha, Keb., Public Library 

Otis, Col. H. G 

Owen, E. H 

Pacific Underwriters^ Association 

Bockford, 111., Public Library 

Shaw, Henry 

Smith, Geo. H. &, Hansen, Geo 

San Diego, Cal., Public Library 

San Fr.vncisco Mercantile Library 

Times-Mirror Pub. Co 

Treichel, Gov. Chas. 

U. S. Government 

Weymouth, A. B 

MTiitehead. H. C 

Witmer, H. C 

Total 



BOOKH. 


MAG. 


PAMP. 


1 






1 






1 






3 






8 




19 
21 


1 






6 




4 


20 




2 


41 






213 






112 




135 


1 






X 






4 






1 




9 


26 






4 




19 


33 






1 






1 






1 






1 






9 






1 






8 






1 




4 


101 






1 


9 




1 






1 






2 


195 




1 






1 




3 


92 






3 






840 






1 






37 


52 




40 






1610 


256 


216 



SUNDRIES 



1 Etching 



2 Operas 



7 Maps 



1 Map 



11 



PERIODICALS. 



The Following Periodicals are on File in the 

Reading Rooms: 

DAILIES. 
Los Angeles Herald. 

'* *' Times. 

'' *« Tribune. 

" '* Evening Express. 

San Francisco Alta. 

** ** Call. 

" ** Chronicle. 

" '* Examiner. 

Arizona Citizen. 
Boston Advertiser. 
Chicago Tribune. 
Cincinnati Commercial-Gazette. 
Denver Republican. 
New York Tribune. 
Oakland Tribune. 
Omaha Bee. 
Pasadena Union-Star. 
Philadelphia Ledger. 
Riverside Press. 
Sacramento Record-Union. 
San Diego Union. 
St. Louis Republic. 
Tacoma Ledger. 



LOS ANGBLBS PUBUC LIBRARY. ^31 

WEEKLIES, 

Anaheim Gazette. 

ChiHo Valley Champion. 

California Voice. 

Citrograph. 

La Cronica. 

London Times. 

Los Angeles Herald. 

'* ** Times-Mirror. 

Marysville Appeal. 
Minneapolis Spectator. 
Mining and Scientific Press. 
National City Record. 
New York Dramatic Mirror. 
Ontario Obsenrer. 
Open Court. 
Pacific Rural Press. 
Placer Herald. 
Pomona Times-Courier. 
Publisher's Weekly. 
San Francisco Argonaut. 
Santa Ana Standard, 
Santa Barbara Herald. 
Santa Barbara Independent. 
Sacramento Union. 
San Luis Obispo Tribune. 
Santa Monica Outlook. 
Victoria Times. 



22 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 






The Following Periodicals are on File at the Deliv- 
ery Desk, where they may be obtained for 
USE IN THE Reading Room. 

WEEKLIES. 

Athenaeum. 
Bee Journal. 
Congressional Record. 
Critic. 
Harpei's Bazar. 

Weekly. 

Young People. 

Independent 

Journal of Education. 

Leslie's Illustrated News. 

Life. 

London Graphic. 

** Illustrated News. 

*' Lancet. 
Nation. 

Pall Mall Budget. 
Paris Illustr^. 
Revue des deux Mondes. 
Rural Calif orni an. 
Scientific American. 
Scientific American Supplement. 
Ueber Land und Meer. 
Youths' Companion. 



LOS ANGBLES PITBUC LIBRARY. 23 



MONTHLIES. 



Atlantic, 3 copies. 

American Florist. 

American Agriculturalist. 

Blackwood's Magazine. 

Book Chat. 

Chambers's Journal. 

Christian Science Journal. 

Contenip>orary Review. 

Century, 7 copies 

Cosmopolitan, 2 copies. 

Current Literature, 2 copies. 

Demorest. 

Delineator. 

Dress. 

Dial. 

Eclectic. 

Edinburgh Review. 

Forum, 5 copies. 

Fortnightly Review. 

Golden Era. 

Good Housekeeping. 

Harper's, 7 copies. 

Lippincott's, 2 copies. 

Littell's Living Age. 

Le Francais. 

Lucifer. 

Musical Courier. 

Medical Visitor. 



24' REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

Medical Record. 

Notes and Queries. 

North American Review, 5 copies. 

Nineteenth Century, 2 copies. 

Outing, 2 copies. 

Overland Monthly, 2 copies. 

Pacific Medical Journal. 

Pacific Monthly. 

Popular Science Monthly, 3 copies. ^ 

Poultry World. 

Poultry in California. 

Public Opinion. 

Scribner's, 6 copies. 

Season. 

Southern California Practitioner. 

St. Nicholas, 6 copies. 

Shakespeariana. 

The Path. 

Unitarian Review. 

Wide Awake, 3 copies. 




r 






7=5 IMNUKL-' REPORT + 



OF THE 



BogRD OF !)IRI5(?T0Rg 



OF THE 



Cos flp^el^sj^ublie library 



AND 



REPORT op Ll8R?lRIfICl 



•f 1890 -f 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN. 



December^ i8go. 



*r 



LOS ANGELES : 
TIMES-MIRI^OK PRINTING AND BINDING HOUSE. 

J890. 



'^^ 



-^TN^ocor^ 



'^ 



JAN 22 1891 



I 



/^WcX 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRfiRY. 



DIRECTORS. 

G. A. DoBiNsoN, President, 
H. Jay Hanchbtte. Frank H. Howard. 
£. W. Jones. J. Mills Daviks. 



COMMITTEES. 

Books and Donations. 

Messrs. G. A. Dobinson, H. Jay Hanchettb, 

Frank H. Howard. 

Rules and Administration, 
Messrs. £. W. Jones, J. Mills Davies, G. A. Dobinson. 

Printing and Supplies. 
Messrs. Frank H. Howard, E. W. Jones, G. A. Dobinson. 

Auditing and Accounts, 

Messrs. J . Mills Davies, G . A . Dobinson, 
H. Jay Hanchette. 



Miss Tessa L. Kelso, Librarian, 

Miss Adelaide R. Hassb, First Assistant. 

Miss Lena B. Femner, Second Assistant, 

Attendants: 

Miss Estelle Haines, Mrs. E. A. Wellman, 

Miss Cklia Gleason. Miss N. M. Russ, 

Miss Blanche Bevillb. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OK Directors 



OF THS 



Los Angeles Public Library, 



Decemt>er, 180O. 



To the Hanorabhf the City Council of the Oity of Los 
Angeles : 

Gentlbmbn: — The Board of Directors of the Los 
Angeles Public Library has the honor to present to 
your Honorable Body this, its Annual Report, in accord- 
ance with the requirements of Subdivision 17, Section 
58, Article IV of the Charter of the City of Los Angeles. 

Our last report, dated the 4th of December, 1889, to 
which we beg to refer, was made under circumstances 
which prevented us giving you the full information we 
desired, owing to the fact that our Board had only been 
in office for a few months, most of which time had been 
spent in getting things into shape and removing into 
the new quarters which we now occupy in the City Hall. 



8 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The particulars in detail of the operation of the 
Library, the namber of books issued for circulation for 
library use and home use, the amount of moneys received 
and expended, the number of books added, and the 
expenditures for books, salaries and other disbursements, 
will be found in the report of the Librarian, marked 
'' Appendix A," hereto attached, and which is hereby 
made a part of this report. 

We think that a careful examination of these statis- 
tics will impress your Honorable Body and other readers 
with the magnitude of the work that the Library has 
achieved during the past twelve months. We particu- 
larly call attention to the significance of our phenomenal 
circulation, which has rapidly and steadily increased 
from 4,833 in September, 1889, to 11,076 in November, 
1890. Few libraries of double our number of volumes 
can show such figures. In this connection it must be 
borne in mind that a great circulation in a small library 
with few duplicates entails far more labor than the same 
circulation in a large library with many duplicates; for 
the reason that in a small library a large proportion of 
the books are always out and there will necessarily be 
frequent calls for books which are out In the large 
library a requisition will seldom require more than oile 
visit to the shelves, whereas, in the small library the 
attendants will often times have to make many trips 
before the patron is supplied with some substitute for 
the book first called for. 

We have added to our shelves, since our last report, 
7,053 volumes. No one without experience in this 
regard can have any idea of the labor which this has 



LOS ANeELES PUBLIC LT6RART. 9 

entailed. First, every book has been examiued, page by 
page, to ascertain that it was in perfect condition with- 
out sheets missing or misplaced. Second, it has been 
classified in the general class and its proper subdivision, 
marked, and a card made out for the card catalogue, 
the book plate inserted and the book numbered and 
labeled before it was ready for the shelves. With some 
classes of books this process is comparatively rapid, but 
with other books the operation requires careful examina- 
tion, study and judgment, and is necessarily slow. We 
may say that a large proportion of the books added 
during the past year have been of this latter character. 
In the item^of expense the reports of other public libra- 
ries in the United States show that our expenditure on 
salaries and working expenses has been remarkably less, 
in proportion to the amount expended in the purchase 
of books, than is the case with many of these other 
libraries. A comparison of the figures herewith sub- 
mitted will make this point more clear. 

Books, Binding 

and Salaries. 

Periodicals. 

StLouis $8,105 98 $10,409 23 

Chicago 16,429 08 49,631 91 

Detroit 10,247 53 14,702 17 

Cincinnati 11,597 97 29,396 25 

Patterson, N. J 1,565 09 3,288 35 

Portland, Me 1,795 65 3,556 22 

San Francisco, Cal 5,112 98 16,211 88 

Springfield, Mass 8,949 07 6,125 81 

Toledo, 2,803 83 3,185 75 

Los Angeles 11,803 49 6,156 83 



10 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRBOTORS 

The above is a fair sample of the reports received 
from libraries in all parts of the country. Omaha is the 
only one which would appear favorably in comparison 
with our own in this regard, but its report does not 
enable us to give the exact figures. 

Owing to the large addition that has been made to 
the shelves in the purchase of books under appropria- 
tions made by your Honorable Body, we have found 
ourselves at this time in a dilemma on account of the 
limited accommodation for the fresh arrivals of books, 
and we suggest that your Honorable Body should, after 
proper investigation, afford us a more ample space for 
the purpose of giving that satisfaction to the public for 
which the library was established. Since the arrival of 
a large quantity of reference books in different depart- 
ments there has been an increasing demand for exam- 
ination of the same by persons who are evidently 
students, desirous of using the library for the purpose 
for which it is intended. In order to give these people 
the accommodations they need for the examination of 
many books at a time, we have segregated a certain 
space, but find that it is entirely insufficient, and we 
think that this growing demand should be properly met, 
which can only be done by an extension of the floor 
space now at our disposal. 

For the purpose of increasing the efficiency of the 
reference department we have made extensive purchases 
of sets of magazines and reviews in the past year. The 
importance of this department cannot well be overesti- 
mated, having in view the fact that the best thought 
and most intelligent observation, not only of questions 
of the day and of current literature, but on aU branches 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 11 

of thoaght, is found in^monographs contained in these 
periodicals and scientific and literary reviews. Indeed, 
the possession of* complete sets of such reviews would 
alone form a library which 'would be a mine of the 
richest kind for all students.* This mine has been made 
available by " Poole's Index for Periodical Literature,'' 
wherein a student upon any subject can ascertain where 
all articles upon that question may be found. 

We found one set, comprising 73 volumes of periodi- 
cals in the library when we took possession, and we have 
added 1,430 volumes to this department. This tells you 
what we have already received, but we have others on 
the way and orders out for the purchase of other desir- 
able sets of reviews, to be filled as soon as the same can 
be done at reasonable figures. We may say that our 
library contains at least 4,000 volumes which could be 
to great advantage segregated on the shelves of a refer- 
ence library, where students could consult them without 
calling upon the attendants, thus relieving those attend- 
ants of labor, and to the greater ease and satisfaction 
of the students themselves ; but this result cannot be 
achieved until we obtain the much desired increase of 
floor space. 

Incidental to the growth of the library is a corres- 
ponding demand on the part of the public for a Cata- 
logue. Few people understand the labor involved in 
making a^ Catalogue of books. We.have been continu- 
ously preparing the materials for the same, but it would 
be impossible and unadvisable to print a regular Cata- 
logue at present. We have in hand, however, the pre- 
paration of a Finding List which will answer the purpose 



12 REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

of a Oatalo^e temporarily, and we expect it will be 
ready for circulation in the course of a few weeks. The 
Finding List^ when completed, will be of ^eat assist- 
ance to the patrons of the library. They will be able 
to take it home and make out their demands without 
the necessity of consulting the shelf sheets which are at 
present in use on the counter. 

The library has been enriched during the past year 
by a number of liberal donations, the particulars of 
which will be found in the Librarian's Report, and for 
which donations we beg to tender our sincere thanks. 
The Book Committee has been assisted from time to 
time in its work, which is of the most difficult pertaining 
to the library, by many friends, who have supplied lists 
of works in departments with which they are familiar, 
and from these lists the Committee has been able to 
make selections which have resulted in giving us in 
many cases the best authorities upon the subjects indi- 
cated. The Book Committee has not pretended to 
possess an encyclopedic knowledge of every branch 
involved in the selection of books for a public library. 
It has therefore been glad to receive suggestions to help 
it in its work, and owes recognition to a number of 
scientific and professional ladies and gentlemen of this 
city for lists and suggestions by which the collection of 
historical, scientific and religious departments have been 
increased. To Mrs. A. M. Averill and Mrs. Jeanne Carr 
for lists on history and works on California ; to Baron 
Bogniat, Prof. A. P. Dietz, Miss Kate Brousseau, and 
Prof. Weiler for lists of French works ; to The Buskin 
Art Club for lists of art works ; to General J. M. Bald- 
win for lists on mathematics j to Eev. A. J. Wells for 



LOS AKGEIiBS PUBUG LBBRAST. 13 

lists of theological works, and to Rev. Bishop Mora for 
lists of Catholic literature, we especially acknowledge 
our indebtedness. Our library is also enriched by the 
addition of a considerable number of musical scores, 
which have been eagerly availed of by the public. This 
new departure, for it is such, there being but about six 
libraries in the United States which have music for 
circulation, should be followed up, and the stock of 
scores on hand increased. There are a large number of 
musical people in this city who desire to see the best 
that is published in their profession, but who cannot 
afford to buy expensive scores for mere information. 
The library is thus enabled to furnish, at a small pro- 
portionate cost, the means of information for which the 
musical community is hungry. In the Art Department 
a number of important purchases have been made which 
have greatly increased the resources of the library and 
have afforded valuable assistance to the art clubs and 
other students of art. The extent to which they have 
been used shows their great popularity, and any further 
expenditures in that department will be in a right direc- 
tion. We have also endeavored to make the library 
virtually a part of our public school system, by, firstly, 
giving aU teachers the freedom of the library. Secondly, 
by supplying pedagogical literature, and, thirdly, by 
special attention upon the part of the Librarian to the 
wants of the teachers, and lastly, by the addition of a 
large number of books for juveniles, and in making the 
free use of them by school children dependent upon 
their school reports. We are happy to say that the 
teachers have appreciated and availed themselves of 
these facilities, and that the attendance of school chil- 



14 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

dren has been very gratifying, both as to nambers and 
deportment. 

The Board has, within the past few months, made a 
reduction of the dues charged for home use of books ; 
the amount being now fifty cents per quarter, as against 
one. dollar per quarter, the former price. The increase 
of subscribers in consequence has been very large. At 
the present rate of increase it would seem that the 
library should be soon made entirely free, not only for 
local use, as it is now, but also for the use of books at 
home. We have been hindered from making the library 
absolutely free, first, by the want of a printed Finding 
List, and secondly, by the want of space. The first dif- 
ficulty will be soon obviated, but the second is the most 
serious. We can only say that if we had at our disposal 
the whole third floor of th^ City Hall we could estab- 
lish a creditable reference department and make the 
library absolutely free, and that without this space it 
cannot be done, i 

The thanks of the Board are due to the local daily 
press for extra copies of their papers, and for kind 
attention to the library wants. The extra copies of each 
of the four daily papers ever since the accession of the 
present Board, have been bound and are kept for ref- 
erence in the library. 

The books and accounts of the Library were exam- 
ined by W. B. Blackman, public accountant, by order 
of the Grand Jury, in common with the other city 
official accounts, up to th^ first day of October, 1890, 
and in a separate report made by him to this Board he 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRABT. 15 

states that upon examination he finds the accounts well 
and systematically kept, and correct. 

With the increase in the circulation and the large 
amount of books arriving for accession to the shelves, 
it has been necessary to occasionally employ some extra 
help in the library. This, however, varies according to 
the demands. The Committee on Attendants has taken 

9 

care to select from the crowd of applicants for positions 
only such as showed some promise of fitness, and capa- 
city for the work required. Candidates have had to file 
written applications, and appear before the Committee 
for examination as to their quaUfioations. In fact, the 
Civil Service rules have been observed in making all 
appointments and promotions in the library. The stafF 
of assistants has to be on duty from nine o'clock in the 
morning until half-past nine o'clock at night, and as the 
legal hours of service cannot exceed eight hours per 
diem, it will easily be seen that the long time during 
which the library is kept open and which the public 
demands, requires a more numerous staff than if the 
library were only kept open eight hours per diem. 

The filling up of the present quarters and the promise 
that every available nook and corner will shortly be 
occupied, impels us once more to call the attention of 
your Honorable Body to the necessity of supplying us 
with larger and more commodious quarters. Indeed, 
the time seems ripe for putting the Public Library into 
a building of its own, and to let it rank thereby with 
other public libraries in cities no larger than our own. 

We desire also to call your attention to the fact that 
the appropriations for the support of the library, liberal 



16 REPOBT OF BOARD OF DIBB0TOB8 

as they have appeared, have nevertheless never reached 
the amount authorized under the Charter to be de- 
voted to that purpose. The limit is five cents on 
each one hundred dollars, and it would seem that there 
should be no objection to devoting this proportion of 
the taxes to so important an object as the Public Library. 

The Board of Directors has collectively and individ- 
ually taken the greatest interest in the success of the 
institution committed to its charge, and its members 
have severally devoted a considerable amount of time 
to the different departments of the administration and 
supervision, especially in the selection and purchase of 
the proper kind of books to be placed upon the shelves, 
having in view the difficulty of supplying a large want 
in every department of literature with the comparatively 
limited means at their disposal for that purpose. The 
management of the library, which has been entrusted 
entirely to the Librarian, has given great satisfaction 
to the Board, and we believe also to the public. The 
system adopted by the Board in the selection of attend- 
ants has resulted also very satisfactorily, and the staff 
as a whole is entitled to the commendation of this 
Board, on account of its faithful and intelligent devotion 
to the various duties devolving upon it. 

We desire to call the attention of your Honorable 
Body to the fact that the Convention of the American 
Library Association, which comprises all the Librarians 
in the United States, will be held in San Francisco in 
the coming month of September, being the first time it 
has ever been held on this coast. This new departure 
is partly the result of our Librarian's visit to the East 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 17 

last snmmer, she having prevailed upon the managers 
to recognize the olaims of the Paoiflc slope. We are 
informed that the Librarian of the San Francisco Public 
Library also went East to assist in accomplishing this 
object. The Convention is a highly important one, 
being the means of bringing together the people who 
know all about library work, and of enabling them to 
exchange their views and ideas on the means for pro- 
moting the success of public libraries. A deputation 
from this library should certainly attend the Convention 
when the time arrives. 

The library has received the benefit of a good many 
new suggestions and ideas, in its practical work, gath- 
ered by the Librarian on her tour among the principal 
libraries of the country, and especially in the making 
and arrangment of a card catalogue which is now being 
made preparatory to the printing of a general catalogue 
at a future date. 

In conclusion we desire to call your especial attention 
to the impending change which is threatened in the man- 
agement of the library. The present Board of Directors 
was appointed by the Mayor in March, 1889, under and 
by virtue of the provisions of the new charter. Article 
VIII, Section 83, which provides that: "The Mayor 
shall appoint a Board of five Directors, subject to confir- 
mation by the Council, for said library, who shall serve 
without compensation and be known as the Board of 
Directors of the Los Angeles Public Library, and who 
shall be chosen from the citizens at large, male or 
female, without regard to their political opinions, but 
with reference to their fitness for said office." The pres- 



18 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

ent Board having been so appointed, and their appoint- 
ment confirmed and approved by your Honorable Body, 
have continued and remain the Directors in charge of, 
and responsible for, the care and property of the library, 
their term of office expiring 25th March, 1891. We 
learn that at the recent city election a Board of Library 
Trustees was elected, presumably to take charge of the 
institution now in our care. This election, we are 
informed, was ordered under the provisions of a permis- 
sive Act of the State Legislature, passed in 1880, allow- 
ing municipal corporations to establish free public 
libraries. If, however, a demand should be made upon 
us by such elected board for the property now in our 
custody, we feel that it would be impossible, under the 
circumsbances, for us to part with its control without 
judicial adjudication of the rights of the contestants 
in the premises. Under the existing system, which has 
been carried on in accordance with the spirit of the 
charter, politics have not been allowed to interfere in 
any degree with the working and administration of the 
library. We should regret as citizens to see it pass 
under political control. We are in charge of the library 
by virtue of our appointment and confirmation under 
the charter, and propose to continue to administer our 
trust until our successors are appointed and qualified, 
or until some decision of the courts is made to the 
contrary. 

(Signed) G. A. Dobinson, President. 

B. W. Jones. 

P. H. Howard. 

H. Jay Hanchbtte. 

J. MiLiiS Davies. 



APPENDIX A. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 



1889-90. 



To the Board of Directors of The Los Angeles Public 
Library : 

Gentlemen : — The annual report of the Librarian of 
the Los Angeles Public Library is herewith respectfully 
submitted. 

The statistics embodied in this report are for a period 
of one year, 1st December, 1889 to 1st December, 1890, 
it being the first time in the history of the Library that 
such statistics have been compiled. 

The City Council apportioned to the Library fund 
for the fiscal year 189a91, the sum of $21,222, derived 
from the city tax-levy, payable semi-annually. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Library fund 
for the past year (ire as follows : 



20 REPORT OP BOARD OP D1RBGT0R8 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand Ist December, 1889 $13,021 89 

Received on account of apportionment, fiscal year, 

1890-91 10,865 12 

Fines $ 101 36 

Dues 1366 OO— 1,467 36 



Total $26,364 36 

EXPENDITURES. 
Books and Periodicals $12,220 27 

lilBRABY EXPBNSB — 

Printing $22000 

Stationery and Supplies 200 00 

Library Blanks 343 60 

Insurance 279 00 

Carpentering 183 66 

Furniture and Fixtures 300 00 

Traveling expenses allowed on Librarian's 

special report 250 00 

City of Los Angeles, account cost of run- 
ning elevator 480 00 

Telephone 60 00 

Sundries, petty expenses 262 29 



, . ( Library staff. 5676 83 

Salaries. •{ 

'/Janitor 480 00 



2578 44 



6156 83 



Balance in hands City Treasurer 4398 82 



$25,354 36 



These figures are especially noteworthy from the fact 
that the salary account is one-half that of the book 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 21 

account, a showing very few libraries can make, consid- 
ering the large circolation of books of this library. 

The book account of the library is fully set forth in 
the following statement : 

Number of volames in library let December, 1889 11,028 

Nomber of volmnes accessioned to let December, 1890 7,053 

Total 18,081 

Diflcarded 152 

Lost 4— 156 



Total number of volumes in library 1st December, 1890 — 17,925 

The discarded books and odd numbers of periodicals 
were divided between the County Hospital and News- 
boys' Home, for the use of the inmates. 

Of the above number of books in the Library ^3,060 
volumes are Public Documents, and a reference collec- 
tion numbering 2,319, all of which do not circulate, 
leaving 12,546 volumes available for circulation outside 
of the Library. 



22 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



The circalation as recorded, is as follows : 
MONTHLY CIRCULATION 



December isi, i88g^ to November soth, iSgo^ Inclusive. 





HOME T8HUB. 


LIBBART I8S0E. 


TOPAL. 


December 


3,117 


3,217 


6,364 


January 


3,334 


7,166 


10,600 


February 


3,188 


6,544 


9,232 


March 


4,179 


7,378 


11,657 


April 


3,306 


6,968 


1 9,274 


May 


3,678 


6,232 


9,810 


June 


3,666 


6,184 


9,749 


July 


4,260 


6,882 


10,142 


August 


4,539 


5,899 


10,438 


September 


4,701 


6,136 


10,837 


October 


4,380 


5,988 


10,368 


November 


6,026 


6,067 
72,661 


11,092 


Total 


4,7172 


119,833 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 23 

The Sunday attendance for the year amounted to 
8,046, or an average of 152 visitors per Sunday, the 
Library being open from one o'clock p. m. to six o'clock 
p. m. on that day. 

No record is kept of the use of books in the reference 
department, the public having direct access to the books, 
but the space at our command for this purpose is so 
jimited that not one-fourth of the demand can be accom- 
modated. 

The daily use of the periodicals on file in the reading 
rooms average one hundred visitors per day, but no 
record is kept and the figures are not included in the 
circulating tables. The grand total of the use of the 
Library for the year may be summed up as follows : 

Recorded use 119,833 

Reference and Periodical Depts (Estimated) 54,000 

Total 173,833 

There are two hundred and twenty-one periodicals 
received in the Library, which are apportioned as follows : 

On file in Reading Rooms 47 

On file at Delivery Desk 122 

For use at home 52 

That the circulation of current periodicals is popular 
ma; best be judged by the fact that with fifty-two 
periodicals the circulation amounted to 4,391 for the year^ 

The large number of newspapers from surrounding 
towns, on file in the Reading Rooms, required so much 
space that their continuance was deemed impracticable, 



24 RBPOBT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

and the donors of the papers have since transferred 
them to the Chamber of Commerce, where they are on 
file for nse of the general public. 

Special attention has been given to the reference col- 
lection in the purchase of books. Complete sets of the 
leading English and American Reviews have been added, 
while the other classes have received the attention that 
the demand warranted. 

Among the more noteworthy purchases of books in 
the past year may be mentioned the following : 

American Catalogue ; 

American and English Cyclopedia of Law ; 

D'Agincourt's History of Art from its Monuments ; 

Britton's Cathedral Antiquities ; 

Cyclopedia Music and Musicians ; 

Cyclopedia Painters and Painting ; 

French and Lacy's complete collection of Acting Plays; 

Furness' Shakespeare; 

432 volumes of choicest French literature ; 

Knight's New Mechanical Dictionary ; 

500 volumes of the best musical works ; 

Pistolesi, II Yaticano ; 

Riverside Natural History , 

Riverside edition English Poets ; 

Sargent's Silva of North America ; 

173 vols. Spanish literature, including, among others, 

Mexico ; & trav^s de los Siglos ; 
Steadman's and Hutchinson's American Literature ; 
Thorwaldsen's Works ; 
Turner's Works ; 



LOS ANQBLES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 25 

lire's Diet, of Art, Mannf aetures and Mines ; 

Vedder's Bnb&iy&t \ 

Winsor's Narrative and Critical History of America. 

On the 1st of July the Board of Directors extended 
the privileges of the Library, daring vacation, to all 
pnpils of the public schools who attained an average of 
90 per cent in their examinations. Cards were issued 
to 272 pnpils and the increase of juvenile visitors to the 
Beading Booms averaged one hundred per day, the cir- 
culation of books to these children amounted to 11,830 
volumes in ten weeks. 

The Library staff deserve especial mention and praise 
for the patience and effort exerted to impress the youth- 
ful readers with a proper understanding of the use of 
the card catalog and other aids and guides, and to 
inspire consideration for the books ; the result of the 
care exercised is very apparent and highly satisfactory 
from the moral effect and from a business standpoint 
as well ; since the principles of care and cleanliness 
thus instilled in the minds of the juvenile reader adds 
50 per cent to the length of the life of a book on the 
Library shelves. 

During the past year the important work of making 
a card catalog of the books has been actively going 
forward under the care of especially trained catalogers. 
Mr. C. A. Cutter's " Bules for a Dictionary Catalog " 
being the adopted guide for the work. 

The compilation of a Finding List of authors and 
titles of the contents of the Library was begun on the 



26 REPORT OP BOARD OP TRUSTEES 

1st October, and will be in the hands of the printer by 
the 15th December. 

The copy for the Finding List has been written on 
cards, postal size, directly from the books, and will be 
continued in that form after the list is published from 
them. 

To compile a list under such pressure of limited time 
of course, cannot be satisfactory, nor is it published at 
aU from choice, since the Library is growing so rapidly 
as to render its usefulness very short lived, but it has 
been rendered imperative from the lack of desk room 
for consulting of the shelf sheets, which for the 
past year have been the sole means of access to the 
contents of the Library aside from the help afforded by 
the staff of attendants, on whom the circulation has in 
the main depended. 

The experiment of circulating music has proven a 
decided success, that it has been appreciated by our 
patrons is shown by the circulation of 540 volumes in 
the eight months it has been on the shelves, while the 
high character of the collection must prove an import- 
ant educational feature. 

A special effort is being made to collect photograpio 
views of the city and surrounding country, and it is 
earnestly urged upon our citizens to assist us in this 
collection, and in the .preservation of scraps, old news- 
papers, pamphlets, etc., relating to the history of our 
region, by donating anything available of the kind to 
the Library, where it will be carefully preserved and 
indexed for use. 



LOS ANGELES PUBUO LIBRARY. 27 

Appended will be found a list of donors who, during 
the past year, have kindly favored the Library with ^fts 

Respectfully submitted, 

TESSA L. KELSO, 

Librarian, 



LIST OF DONATIONS 



TO THE 



From Dec, ist^ i88g^ to Dec. ist^ 18^0. 



Agricultaral Dep't, U. 8 

AlbaEy Public SchoolB 

Amherst College 

Bengough, E. A . Miss 

Berkeley Library 

Boston Public Schools 

Bowdoin College 

Blum, A 

Browne^ Selah W 

Brown University 

Buffalo Historical Society 

California Academy of Science . . . 

Carr, Mrs. J. C 

Central Pacific R. R., Law Dep't. . 

Chamberlain, V. P 

Chapman, A. B 

Channing, Dr. W. F 

Chicago Public Library 

Chicago Public Schools 

Cincinnati Public Library 

Cleveland Public Library 

Coats, W. R 

Columbia College 

Commerce Commission U. S 

Cooper Union 

Cornell University 

Council Bluffs F. P. Library 

Damron, J. M 

Da3rton Public Library 

Dennis, H. J 

Denver Public Schools 

District of Columbia 

Dobinson, G. A 

Dole, Dr. F. F 

Dunbar, A. R 



BOOKS 



• •■•• ••■■•• 



9 
1 



16 



3 
2 



1 
1 
2 
2 

8 

18 



MAG. 



2 
1 



2 

38 
1 



PAMP. 


SUNDRIES. 


9 




« • • » 

2 




• • • ■ 

9 




3 




2 

• a ■ • 




■ • • • 

1 


• • - ■ ■ • • 


17 




2 

• • ■ • 

> * • 




• • • • 

■ • • • 

15 


■ ■•••• • 


11 












• • ■ « 








• • • 




12 








• ■ * • 


• ■•••• « 








• • • • • • • 


6 




13 




• • • » 




» 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



29 



BOOKS 



DoneiDore, C. H 

Enoch Pratt Free Library 

Evening Express 

Fish GommMHrion 

Fitzhenry, T. 

Forman, 

Gilpin, W 

Hainee, B. R 

Hanchette, H, J 

Harkness, F 

Hartford Library Aseociadon 

Haskins, T. W 

EUiynes, Dr. J. S 

Haynee, F. L 

Henry W. T 

Herald, L. A 

Hinton. C. H 

Howard, F. H 

Hutton d Swanwick 

Illinois Secretary of State 

Iowa Secretary of State 

Iowa State Agricultural Society . . 

James, G. W 

Jones, E. W 

Julian, G. W 

Kansas City Public Schools 

Kansas State Agricultural Society 

Manchester Public Library 

McKnight, D. A 

Michi^^ Secretary of State 

Miller, Mrs. M. H 

Milwaukee Public Schools 

Milwaukee Public Library 

Mining Bureau California 

Minneapolis Public SchoolB 

Minnesota Secretary of State 

Minnesota State Agr. Society 

Missouri State B'd Agriculture . . 

Mortimer, C. W 

Ohio Secretary of State 

Omaha Public Library 

Owen, E. H 

Peabody Institute 

Portland Public Library 

Pratt Institute . 

Railroad Commissioners, California 

Rusk, J. M., Department Interior 

San Joed Public Library 

San Francisco Public Schools — 

St. Louis Public Library 

St. Louis Public Schools 

Santa Barbara Soc. Nat History. . 



1 
1 

13 
1 
1 
5 
1 

> • • 

1 
2 
2 
1 



1 
5 

16 
3 

10 
1 
1 



MAG. 



1 
1 

40 
2 



1 

i 



1 

1 



PAMP. 



I 
1 

37 



SUNDRIES 



13 



8 
3 



* • • • 



1 

2 



20 

3 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
6 
1 
1 

1 
2 



1 
5 
1 
3 
1 



30 



REPOET OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 



Simms, Pr. J 

Smith, C. H 

Smithsonian Institute 

Spalding, W. A 

Sprin^eld, Mass. , Public Library . 

State Board of Horticulture 

California Secretary of State 

Stewart, Mrs. G. T 

Toledo Public Library 

Topeka Public Library 

Topeka Public Schools 

Treasury Department U. S . . . 

Turner Free Library 

U. S. Government Office (War De- 
partment I 

United States Department of Inter- 
ior (Bureau of Education) 

U. S. Department of Interior 

U. S. Department of State 

University of California 

University of Wisconsin 

Vetterling, H 

Walker, Dr. Q. S 

Welcome, S. B 

Weymouth, A. B 

Wilhartz, A 

Witmer,H. C 

Worcester Public Library 



BOOKS 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



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LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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REPORT OF LIBRARIAN. 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



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LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN. 



December^ 1891. 



UM AirOKLBB: 
ETZNIVG BZPBXBB OOMPAm', 

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LOS MGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



DIRECTORS. 

G. A. DoBiNSON, Pr€ssdent. 
J. Mills Davies. Frank H. Howard. 

Geo. H. Smith. Mrs. C. M. Sbvsrakcb. 



COMMITTEES. 

Books and Donations, 

Messrs. G. H. Smith, G. A. Dobinson, 

F. H. Howard. 

Rules and Regulations. 
Mrs. C. M. Sevbraxcb, Messrs. G. H. Smith, G. A. Dobinson. 

Printing' and Supplies, 
J. Mills Davixs, Mrs. C. M. Sbverancb, G. A. Dobikson. 

Auditing and Accounts. 

Messrs. F. H. Howard, G. A. Dobinsok, 

J. Mills Davibs. 

Attendants, 
G. A. DoBixsoN, Mrs. C. M. Sevbrancb, F. H. Howard. 



Tessa L. Kelso, Librarian, 
Adelaide R. Hasse, First Assistant, 
Lena B. Fbnnbr, Second Assistant, 

Attendants: 

Estbllb Haines, Elizabeth Fargo, 

Celia Gleason, Stella Walker, 

Nellie Russ, Margaret Logan, 

Blanche Beville, Corinne Wise, 

Helen Kimball, Mattie Tedford. 

Pupils : 

Sadie Austin, Leila Kingsley, 

Mary Bills, Harriet Mercer, 

Margaret Bixby. Bertha Pierce. 

Janitor : 
SiNA A. Vena. 



REPO RT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

OP THE 

Los Angeles Public Library. 

December. 1891. 



To the Honorable CowmH of the City of Los Jngeles: 

Gentlemen: — ^The Board of Directors of the Public 
Library in rendering its annual report according to law, 
desires, in the first place, to recapitulate a few facts con- 
cerning the history of the library during the past year 
that may prove of interest to the public as well as to your 
Honorable Body. 
Retnwpect. j^ the first place, it may be noted that the Mayor, 

after his re-election by the people in December, 1890, re- 
appointed the old board of directors under the charter, 
and his appointment was approved by your Honorable 
Body. The board of directors then re-elected its former 
president. The regular staff was considered as already 
appointed, and not in need of further confirmation, and 
the management of the library remained practically 
unaltered. 

As outlined in our last report, there was a board of 
trustees claiming control of the library under an election 



6 REPORT or BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

by popular vote, taken under an old State Law, and to 
determine the claims of such trustees a suit was brought 
in the Superior Court of this county, wherein it was 
decided that the incumbents had the only right to the 
office under the charter. The case has been appealed to 
the Supreme Court, and is now awaiting a final decision. 

^ sSfd! ^^ '^^ The membership of the board has undergone some 
changes: 

First — By the resignation of Maj. E. W. Jones on 
account of the pressing nature of his private business, 
and the appointment of Mrs. C. M. Severance in his 
place. 

Second — By the appointment of Col. Geo. H. Smith 
in the place of Mr. H. J. Hanchette, the mystery of whose 
regrettable disappearance on his visit to Chicago has 
never been cleared up. 

A^ution of The abolition of dues, which had previously been 
reduced to fifty cents per quarter, made an immediate 
increase in the demands upon the library's resources, 
and this board feels amply justified in having made the 
library entirely free to all residents of the city. By reso- 
lution it has also extended the privileges of the library to 
non-residents who are also taxpayers in this city. 

^Rwm!^'^''^ We have to note the opening of the Reference Depart- 
ment, in which are kept about three thousand volumes. 
This has given great relief to the library force, inasmuch 
as the books for reference are placed * on shelves free of 
access to all students. It was owing to the courtesy of 
the Board of Education in surrendering the room 
formerly used by them for their semi-monthly meetings 
that we were enabled to extend this accommodation to the 
public; and not a day passes but ample testimony is 



LOe ANGELES PUBUC UBRARY. 7 

borne to the fact of its great usefalnees; indeed, so large 
is the patronage that the present seating capacity for 
those who are desirions to read and study and make notes, 
is so limited that some additional facilities must soon be 
provided. 

^Boom^'^ ^^ l^^v® ^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^® addition of the Work Room, 

which has been made by partitioning off a portion of the 
corridor, for which accommodation we tender our grateful 
thanks to your Honorable Body. The new room has 
proved very useful, affording a retired place where the 
mechanical work of the library can be carried on without 
interruption. 

EiCTator. r^YiQ curtailment of the hours during which the elevator 

is allowed to run has resulted in causing considerable in- 
convenience, and is the source of daily complaint on the 
part of the public. 

There are thirteen people on the staff pay-roll without 
counting the janitor, and this number is insufficient to 
carry on the library work on account of the enormous in- 
crease that the figures will show in the demands upon 

Librtry Pupils tljgjp time. The board has adopted the expedient of 
engaging pupils, of whom six in number are now serving 
and give their time for six months without pay, for the 
space of three hours per day each, and are beiug taught 
the routine of library work. These pupils were appointed 
after examination, and have exhibited an interest in the 
work which encourages this Board to anticipate good 
results from its new departure. 

lArarysuir. Owiug to the great increase in the demands upon the 
energies of the staff caused by the rapid increase of circu- 
lation, the librarian, assistants and attendants have been 
taxed to an extent that was not anticipated, and it is but 



8 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIBECT0B8 

fair that their earnest and enthufiiastic work should be 
recognized, and we take great pleasure in doing so. 

The librarian, Miss Kelso, has demonstrated her pos- 
session of excellent executive ability and to her knowledge 
of the wide range of resources that can be made helpful 
in each department, and to her energy and quick intelli- 
gence is owing no small share of the library's present 
prosperous condition. She has been ably and faithfully 
helped by her assistants. Miss Hasse and Miss Fenner, 
the former of whom has done excellent service in the 
notation and classification of Public Documents on an 
original plan to make their contents more easily available 
to the public. The zealous work of the Misses Haines, 
Gleason, Beville and Kimball is also deserving of special 
commendation, 
"^^brary abJu! '^^^ American Library Association visited San Fran- 
cisco last September, and there held its first conference 
on this coast. After the conference, an excursion, in 
which about forty of the principal members took part, 
was formed for the purpose of visiting the southern por- 
tion of the state, and the members were received and 
entertained at the city hall by the Mayor and a very large 
gathering of our principal citizens. The visit of this dele- 
gation, composed, as it was, of men and women who are 
foremost in library work in the United States, was of 
great benefit to our community, as among other things 
it will be the means of disseminating an amount of infor- 
mation about our resources and position that could be 
done in no other way with such good effect. The differ- 
ent members of the delegation expressed their surprise 
and pleasure at the resources of the library, in terms 
especially complimentary to His Honor Ihe Mayor and 



LOS ANQELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9 

to your Honorable Body for giving effect to the public 
sentiment which had called for the establishment and 
maintenance of so useful an institution. 

'iibrarirt!*^^ Among Other changes, the public school libraries have 
been turned over to this Board, under agreement, for 
circulation, and we find that this change affords much 
greater facilities for the use of books and more satisfac- 
tion to book borrowers than was possible under the system 
before practiced. 

BuUetiiL The Board has also begun the publication of a monthly 

bulletin, free of expense to the library, and at the cost of 
the publisher, Mr. E. T. Cook, in which such information 
is given as will be useful to the patrons of the library 
and to the general public. 

Boyle Heights. A,n arrangement has also been made by w^hich patrons 
residing on Boyle Heights can be supplied with books 
without the necessity of going to the library itself. This 
arrangement has been made through the kindness of the 
ladies of the Boyle Heights Library Association, and 
might be profitably imitated in other outlying districts 
of the city. 

Appropriation The Board regrets that your Honorable Body found it 
necessary to reduce the appropriation for the uses of this 
library for the current year to an extent which has really 
crippled it in the purchase of new books, including current 
literature in demand, and qets of magazines and reviews, 
which were indispensably necessary for the reference 
department, not to mention text books and other works 
of scientific value which are in constant need for every 
department of art and science. The Board is of opinion 
that such an appropriation as was asked for in the esti- 
mate furnished to the Auditor just prior to the last tax 



10 



REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRECTORS 



GeneroiiH aid 
needed. 



Separate 



marate 
BuildiDK. 



levy, would have met with the hearty concurrence of the 
general public and of the leading taxpayers of this city; 
and it takes leave to suggest that there is no institution 
in the city or county that will afford a better return for 
the money invested than the public library. This fact 
has often been urged and repeated, but, in order that it 
should be properly appreciated and bear fruit at the time 
of the next appropriation, this Board deems it but right 
to impress upon your Honorable Body that a study of this 
library question will well repay the time spent upon it. 

The feeling has been growing fast among our leading 
citizens that the library should be more generously aided. 
The demands upon its resources have increased in an 
enormous percentage every month, and the time is rapidly 
coming when not only a larger appropriation must be 
made for its maintenace, but improved accommodations 
must be provided for its use. To that end this Board 
would respectfully call the attention of the Council to the 
necessity of providing some separate public building for 
the use of the library, and would suggest that the vacant 
lot on the north side of the city hall might be utilized for 
the purpose of erecting such a building. 

It is not to be supposed that the present accommoda- 
tions can be made permanent. The seating capacity of 
the rooms now in use is inadequate, and the counter 
space is, particularly on busy days, quite insufficient. 
While the present state of things may be suffered for a 
time, this Board deems it none too soon to urgently call 
the attention of your Honorable Body to the necessity of 
providing in time for the change which will surely have 
to be made in the near future. In this connection, the 
Board is aware that the Council has not at its command 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 11 

the resources necessary to provide for so large an outlay 
as would be required for the erection of a building, and 
equipping it in a satisfactory manner, but the Council 
may do a great work in assisting to call the attention of 
our liberal, enlightened and wealthy citizens to this cry- 
ing public necessity. No institution in the nature of a 
public library has been successfully built up by a taxation 
alone, and it therefore behooves those who are aware of 
the needs of the library to appeal to such of our citizens 
as may be in a position to come forward and do a noble 
work in emulation of many similar acts performed in 
other leading cities of our country. 
J^Prea. To the press of this city we take advantage of this 

opportunity, while thanking it for past favors, to make a 
like appeal for its continued support of a public institu- 
tion that is managed and administered independently of 
politics, in the spirit of the charter, and with a single eye 
to the public service. 
wtifUcB. Pqy the facts and figures setting out in detail the con- 

dition of the library and its operations during the past 
year, the financial showing and other statistical informa- 
tion, we beg to refer your Honorable Body to the report of 
I the librarian to this Board, which is hereto annexed, 

I marked Appendix "A" and made a part of this report, 

I Respectfully submitted, 

G. A. DoBiNSON, President. 
F. H. Howard, 
J. Mills Davies, 
C. M. Severance, 
Geo. H. Smith, 

Directors. 
14th December, 1891. 



12 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



*' APPENDIX A." 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN. 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public 
Library : 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit herewith 
my third annual report, covering the work of the Library 
year : let December, 1890, to 1st December 1891. 

The City Council has apportioned to the Library 
Fund for the fiscal year, Ist August, 1891, to 1st August, 
1892, the sum of $11,960.33, which, added to $4,025.70, 
the fund on hand Ist August, 1891, gives a total of 
$16,026. 

The income of the Library is derived from a "tax 
levy on all taxable property in the city, not to exceed 
five cents on each one hundred dollars of all real and 
personal property." The levy this year was only two 
and five-eighths cents. 

Receipts and expenditures of the Library Fund for 
the past year are as follows : 



LOB ANGELES PUBLIC UBRABY. IS 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand let Deoember, 1890 I 4898 82 

Received balance of apportionment, fiscal year, 

1890-91^ $12,376 00 

Received on accoont of apportionment, fiscal year, 

1891-92^ 6,026 00 

$18,401 00 

Does $771 60 

Fines 241 99 

$1,018 49 

Duplicate books sold $124 27 

Finding listesold 221 16 

1346 42 

$24,168 73 

EXPENDITURES. 

Books AND Pebiodicalb.. $8,339 49 

Library Expense — 

Printing $ 98 06 

Finding lists 726 80 

Annual report 67 80 

Rules and regolations 27 60 

Library blanks 229 00 

Stationery and supplies.. 342 63 

Insurance 288 00 

Traveling expenses — two delegates t<^ American 

Libraiy Association Conference. 100 00 

Telephone 60 00 

Sundries, petty expenses 409 28 

Furniture and fixtures 1,348 46 

$3,686 42 

Library staff 7,464 40 



fLibn 
jjanit 



Sat.aribb , ^ . _,, __ 

Janitor.... 716 86 

$8,170 26 

Balance in hands City Treasurer 3,962 67 

$24,168 73 



14 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

IN GENERAL. 

One of the most important events of the library year 
occurred on 1st July when the library was made entirely 
free. Although the dues had been but 60 cents per quar- 
ter, the increased registration at once demonstrated that 
even so small a fee had hindered a general use of the 
library on the part of the public. 

The Reference Department was opened on the 16th 
June and contains 3206 volumes. 

It was found necessary to have the registration desk 
in the Reference Room, an arrangement that is unsatis- 
factory owing to the disturbance and confusion caused by 
the ceaseless stream of people coming and going. 

The demand made upon this department has neces- 
sitated the presence of two attendants and the room is 
constantly taxed to its utmost capacity. 

Another important addition was gained by partition- 
ing a part of the corridor giving a room 18 x 34 feet, 
which although inconveniently located and exceedingly 
limited in 0pace, affords room for the accession desk, the 
opening and distribution of the mail, preparation of the 
books for the shelves and the use of the typewriters. 

In lieu of a ^^ study," that indispensable feature of a 
modern library, the "Women's Reading Room" has, 
according to qrder of your Board, been placed at the dis- 
posal of classes at designated times, with the resources of 
the library at command, for discussion, etc. 

Among the most important events must be included 
the Conference of the American Library AssQciation held 
in Ban Francisco in October last. Your prompt appreci- 
ation of the benefit to be gained by representation from 



WB ANGELES PUBUC LIBRAJIY. 



15 



this library ia permitting the attendance of three dele- 
gates I am sure will prove itself well founded. 

To come in contact with the library spirit, idea and 
development as expressed by such a convention must be 
of incalculable benefit and every endeavor was made to 
improve the opportunity. 



BOOKS. 

The following statement shows the book account of 
the library: 

Number of yolnmes in library Ist December, 1890 17,925 

Number of yoIuomb acceflsioiied to Ist December, 1891 6,296 

School Ubrary books added 1,016 

Total 26,237 

Discarded 49 

Lost aod paid for 28 

Missing 20 

Total — 97 

Total number of Tolumes in Ubrary Ist December, 1891.. 25,140 

All of the books and pamphlets in the Library have 
been checked and accounted for, and the shelf sheets 
corrected and rewritten. The classified contents of the 
Library are as follows : 



CLA88 

General classes^ 

EncTclopedias 

Pbiloeophj 

Reliction 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science , 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature... 

History 

Geography and Travels 



VOLS. 



3,206 

267 

366 

762 

952 

163 

865 

655 

559 

1,861 

1,379 

1,077 



CLASS. 

Biography 

Fiction 

Juvenile Fiction 

Pacific States 

Music 

Krench , 

German 

Spanish 

Italinn 

Current Periodicals 

Bound Circulating do 
Public Docuroents 



VOlfi. 



1,447 

5,161 

1,492 

278 

631 

666 

248 

234 

213 

136 

1,447 

2,604 



16 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



BOOK CIRCULATION. 

The circulation of books has been something phenom- 
enal, considering the population of the city and the num- 
ber of books in the circulating department. 

Monthly Circulation^ tst December^ iSqo^ to ist December^ i8gi. 



MONTH. 



December. 
January .. 
February., 

March 

April 

May 

June 



♦July 

August 

September 

October 

November 



Total 116,263 



HOME 
IBSUS. 



5,443 

6,372 

6,258 

6,892 

6,539 

6,524 

6,331 

10,082 

13,882 

15,586 

16,225 

16,129 



LIBRARY 
I8PUE. 



6,938 
7,760 
7,328 
8,045 
7,045 
7,213 
7,013 
6,867 
7,074 
7,183 
7,682 
7,661 



TOTAL. 



12,381 
14,132 
13,581 
14,937 
13,584 
13,737 
13,344 
16,949 
20,956 
22,769 
23,907 
23,790 



BEFKREKCE 

DEPABTMEKT 

RKADEBS. 



87,804 204,067 



t558 
1,169 
1,267 
1,349 
1,702 
2,147 



8,182 



* Library made free. f Open fourteen days. 

The circulation by classes is as follows: 



CLASS. 



HOME USE, 



Philosophy.. 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural licence 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Geography and Travels 

Biography 

Fiction 

Juvenile Fiction 

Music. 

French 

German 

Hpanish 

Italian.. 

Periodicals. 

Total 



1,003 

1,492 

1,296 

170 

2,164 

1,051 

1,448 

4,643 

3,208 

4,845 

3,464 

59,393 

16,117 

1,392 

1,431 

587 

577 

15 

11,707 



116,263 



LIBBA&Y USB 



1,083 
1,719 

1,763 

375 

3,249 

2,237 

1,867 

3,572 

2,757 

3,050 

1,947 

12,095 

13,948 

693 

837 

442 

285 

16 

36,229 



87,804 



TOTAL. 



2,086 

3,211 

3,059 

545 

5,413 

3,288 

3,305 

8,215 

5,965 

7,895 

5,411 

71,488 

30,065 

2,085 

2,268 

1,029 

862 

31 

47,936 



204,067 



LOS ANGELES PUBUC UBRARY. 17 

No record is kept of the number of readers who use 
the periodicals on file in the reading rooms, or of the 
Public Document collection. Beside the registered circu- 
lation the average of readers not registered is easily one 
hundred per day. 

Statistics have been compiled, showing the authors 
whose books are most in demand. The following list is 
in the order of their popularity : 

Miffi Alcott Capt. King. Charles Dickens. 

E. P. Roe. G. A. Henty. Walter Scott. 

W. T. Adams. W. Besaot. F. Stockton. 

Of the books, those having the greatest circulation 

were : 

Ramona. Darkest Africa. 

Loma Doone. Ben Har. 



PERIODICALS. 

There are 370 periodicals regularly received at the 
library, which are apportioned as follows : 

On file in reading rooms 64 

On file at delivery desk 170 

For use at home 136 

Total 370 

The privilege of taking periodicals home is one of the 
most satisfactory features of the library. The supply 
does not equal the demand, even with the restriction to 
four days limit for current numbers, seven days for the 
preceding month and two weeks for those prior. The 
number of copies taken for use at home is as follows : 



18 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



PERIODICAL. 



Arena 

Atlantic 

Century 

Coemopolitan 

Current Li<eniture.. 

Eclectic 

Forum 

Harper's Magazine . 

H. Y. People 

Kindergarten 

Lippincott 

Littell's Liv. Age... 



NO. 
COPIES 



6 

4 

21 

6 

2 

4 

4 

21 

10 

1 

3 

1 



PERIODICAL. 



Nation 

New Eng* Magazine. 

N. Am. Keyiew 

Outing 

Overland 

Popular Science 

Review of Reviews... 

Scribner 

St. Nicholas 

Wide Awake. 

Youth's Companion.. 



NO. 
COPIES 



1 
1 
7 
3 
1 
2 
3 
17 
9 
5 
4 



Of the more popular periodicals from two to seven 
copies are bound for the circulating department, the 
remaining copies, when in fit condition after six months 
wear, are distributed among local reading rooms, county 
jail, hospitals, etc. 

GENERAL STATISTICS. 

The registration of borrowers has averaged 1000 |»cr 
month since the 1st of July, the active membership on 
the 1st of December, 1891, being 5,758. In a city of our 
size it should not be less than 10,000, and every endeavor 
will be made to enlarge the membership of the library to 
that extent. 

The Sunday attendance in the Reading Rooms and 
Reference Department has been 7,640 for the year. 

There have been 1,053 books rebound during the past 
year, the flexible roan binding being used on all twelve 
mo. books, it proving a durable binding and one much 
liked by the public. 

The number of books repaired in the Library was 
4,901. Pew Libraries in this country have such wear 
and tear on their circulating borks ns in this Library, the 



LOB ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 19 

home use alone amounting to 116,263, with a stock of 
books numbering 19,063. 

The finding list was issued in July, since which time 
773 copies have been sold at twenty-five cents each. Of 
the separate lists, "Fiction" and "Juvenile Books," 193 
copies have been sold of the former and 41 of the latter 
at ten cents each. 

THE LIBRARY AND THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The Board of Education in July turned over to the 
Library 1,021 volumes of the Public School Library, 
these books having been distributed among thirty school- 
houses in the city. Of this number 105 were unfit for 
use and were discarded. 

The State fund for School Library purposes then in 
the hands of the Board of Education amounted to $498.50, 
which was at once expended in the purchase of 504 
volumes, duplicates of the best juvenile books, making a 
total of 1,420 books belonging to the Public School 
Library. 

These books were placed on the Library shelves, and 
the following agreement made with the Board of Educa- 
tion for the circulation of books in the schools. 

First — Each teacher may draw not to exceed 20 books 
at any one time; a requisition being made upon the library 
by the teacher. The books may be retained four weeks. 

Second — ^The schools of the city to be divided into 
four districts, one district exchangiDg books on each 
Wednesday of the month. 

Third-*-The teacher is required to send to the librarian 
the names of the pupils drawing books at the school, in 



20 REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

order that they may not draw books from the library at 
the same time. 

Fourth — ^Any book damaged or lost while in circula- 
tion under these rules, to be replaced by the Board of 
Education. 

Fifth — ^The Board of Directors of the library to 
furnish a copy of the Finding List to each school, a copy 
of the juvenile list to be furnished to each teacher, the 
entire resources of the library to be at the disposal of the 
schools. 

An arrangement of this kind will be of the greatest 
assistance to the teachers in rendering the contents of the 
library available for supplementary reading, and in 
bringing children and families in contact with books that 
would otherwise make no use of a library, and above all 
to direct and in a great measure control the character of 
the reading of the young. 

The Delivery Room at the library is entirely inade- 
quate to accommodate the crowds in c-onstant attendance, 
and although every effort is made to assist the army of 
young readers, with our present limited quarters it is 
almost an impossibility to do so. This work the teacher 
is in a better position to do, and by affording every assist- 
ance and encouragement to the teacher in the way of 
books, lists and notes we hope to effect a decided im- 
provement in the taste for reading. 

In addition to books for use in the schools there has 
been added a large collection of colored and uncolored 
pictures, supplements to such periodicals as Harper's 
Weekly, Bazar, London News, Graphic, Figaro, etc. 
These plates are mounted temporarily on sheets of tag 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBBAKY. 21 

board and are circulated as books, being used for '' compo- 
sition studies." The teachers have eagerly availed them- 
selves of the collection as filling " a long felt want." 

LIBRARY STAFF. 

After repeated experiments regarding the assignment 
of hours and duties for the staff, the schedule adopted 
some eight months since gives the best satisfaction. 

By the present arrangement every member of reg- 
ular staff is on duty during the usual business hours of a 
day, there being no question that any half-day schedule 
that can be devised interferes with real progress and in- 
terest in the work. 

All of the attendants are required to be at the delivery 
desk some portion of the day. Such contact with the 
public is of service to all, cataloguers included. One 
member of the day force is always on duty with the 
night force, and the Sunday duty is divided among the 
entire staff. The average service as scheduled is nine 
hours per day, but extra time is the rule with all, owing 
to the pressure of work. The enthusiasm and interest 
shown by all employees deserves especial recognition. 
The members of the night force, without exception, come 
in the morning for several hours, in order to become 
acquainted with the details of the work, to learn to use 
the typewriter, practice the library handwriting, etc. 

The regular staff have monthly ** quizzes" on general 
library matters, held in a social way at their homes, and 
the recent formation of the " Southern California Library 
Club" promises the best results in coming together tot 
discussion and criticism of all interested in library 
matters. 



22 REPOBT OF BOABB OF BIRECTOBS 

LIBRARY PUPILS. 

The experience of about a month with the six success- 
ful applicants for positions as pupils promises well and a 
lively interest has been evinced on the part of the 
students. 

The influence of the plan is a good one on the regular 
staff, for the training gained in teaching their several 
specialties. 

My sincere thanks are due to the Board of Directors 
for the care and discrimination with which appointments 
arc made to the staff in whatever capacity. It is to such 
attention that much of the popularity of the library is due. 

NECESSITY FOR A LIBRARY BUILDING. 

The question for consideration during the coming 
year is the urgency of a building for library purposes. 
The space at our command for the storage of books will 
suffice for this year, since there is no fund for the pur- 
chase of books, but the space to accommodate the public 
is now totally insufficient. 

DONATIONS. 

A list of donors who have favored the library with 
gifts during the past year is appended. 

It is again urged upon our citizens that clippings, 
photographs, pamphlets, programmes, and old news- 
papers relating to Los Angeles and vicinity will be of the 
greatest service at the library. 

Respectfully submitted. 

TESSA L. KELSO, 

Librarian, 



LOS AKGEUSS PUBUC UBRARY. 



23 



LIST OF DONATIONS 



TO THE 



Los Angeles Public Library 

From Dec. 1st, 1890, to Dec. 1st, 1891. 



Bangor Pablic Library «.... 

BatterHeo, £ng., Public Libraries. 

Bengoughy Miss £. A 

Berger, Augustine 

Blackman, W. K 

Bowdoin College 

Bridge, Dr. Norman 

Brookline Public Library 

Br ookly n Polytechnic Institute 

Brooklyn Pnblic Library 

Brown, Selah 

Brown University 

Bryn Bfaur College 

Buffalo Historical Society 

Buffalo Public Library 

Ciilif. Acad, of Natural Science.. 

Calif. Historical Association 

Carr, H. J 

Chicago Public J Jbrary 

C bicago Public Schools 

Chicago, Newberry Library 

Cincinnati Historical and Philosophical 

Society 

Cincinnati Young Men's Mercantile Library 

Cleveland Public Library 

Clover, Richardson 

Cblumbus Public School Library 

Conn. Historical Society 

Cornell Univeniity 

Council Bluffs Public Library 

Danville Public Library.. 

Daytnn Public Library 

Denver Public Library 

Detroit Public Library 

Dillingham, B. F 

District Columbia Public Schools. 

Dobinson, G. A 

Enoch Pratt Free Library 

Elizabeth Public Librarv 



BOOKS 



1 

1 



48 



PAMS. 



1 
2 



1 

608 
1 
1 
1 

18 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 

16 
7 
1 

2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
1 
1 
1 
21 
1 
1 



SUNDRIES 



8 mags. 



128 mags. 



lOOdip'ngs 



8 photos. 



24 



REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRECTORS 



Fisher, E. A 

Fletcher Public Library 

Forestry, Cal., State Board 

Franklin, G. E., U. S. Signal Office.., 

French, E. J , 

Friesner, W. M., Supt. L. A. P. S.... 

Goodman, T. IL, S. P. R. R.Co 

Grand Island Public Library.... 

Grand Hapids Public Library 

Green, Samuel S 

Greenslade, L. B , 

Hart,G 

Hartford Library Association 

Hartford University , 

Hoboken Free Public Library , 

Hoitt, Ira G 

Howard, F. H... 

Howard Memorial Library , 

Hunter, Jajr E 

Indianapolis Public Library , 

Jones, Marcus £ 

Kansas Historical Society , 

Keith, Hon. ZibaC «... 

Lafayette Public Library 

Lawson, W. A 

Leland Stanford University 

Long, James W 

Los Angeles Normal School 

MacGowan, Granville 

Manchester Public Library 

Masser, Dr 

Matthews, W. S 

Milwaukee Public Library 

Minneapolis Public Library 

Monnet, J. L 

Mortimer, C. W 

Munk, Dr. J. A 

Nebraska State Historical &k>ciety 

New Bedfonl Public Library 

New Haven Public Library 

New York Free Circulating Library... 

New York State Library 

New York Society Mechanics and. 

Tradesmen 

New York Y. M. C. A 

Newark Public Library 

Newburyport Public Library 

Oakland Public Library 

Omaha Public Library 

Orme, H. S 

Orton, R, H 

Peabody Institute 

Pennsylvania Railroad Co 

Perkins, W. H 

Philadelphia Academy of Science 



BOOKS 



10 



1 

52 

1 



1 
1 



114 



1 
6 
1 



PAMS. 



1 



1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
5 
1 



2 
1 
1 
1 
2 



2 
1 
1 



1 
3 
7 



1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 

1 
1 
1 
2 
5 
2 
3 



1 
1 



SUNDRIBS 



1 map 



1 mag. 



10 maps 



L0« ANGELES PUBLIC UBRAAY. 



25 



Potts, Mn. Louise 

Pratt Institate 

Prinoeton College 

Providenoe Atheneeum 

Providenoe Public Library 

Bbode Island Historical Society 

Bindge, Frederick 

Biveraide Public Library 

San Francisco Free Pubuc Library 

Santa Barbara Public Library 

Scott, Fred. 8 

Seaman, W. W.. 

Simms, Dr. Joseph 

Smith, O. £ 

Spreckels Bros 

Springfield, Warder Public Library 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Assodation... 

St. Louis Public Library 

St. Paul Public Library.. 

Sutro Library, San Francisoo 

Throop University 

Toledo Public Libnuy 

Toronto Public Library 

Tulare Irrigation District 

Turner Free Public Library 

U. S. GOYERNMEMT— 

Department of Asriculture 

Education 

Interior 

Labor 

Navy 

State 

War 

Surgeon General's Office 

Coast and Geodetic Suryey 

Bureau of American Bepublics 

Uniyersity of California 

Uniyersity of Chicago 

Vandeyer, Gen. Wm 

Vassar College 

Waiie, E. G 

Waid, T. H 

Waterbury, Bronson Public Library 

Watertown Public Library 

Wellcome. H. S 

WeymoutD, A. B 

Whitehead, H. C 

Widney, J. P 

Widney, B. M 

Wisconsin Historical Society 

Worcester Public Library 

Yale Uniyersity 

Yates, Dr. L 

Totals 



« 

u 

M 



BOOKS 



314 

1 
1 
1 

16 
6 
2 
2 



111 
""2 



3 
1 



PAM8. 



715 



2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 



1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

13 
2 
1 



37 
1 
6 
2 
3 
1 



2 
2 
1 
1 



8UNDRIK8 



1 
1 
1 
1 



788 



87 maps. 



80 mags. 



26 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The following periodicals and newspapers are regularly 
received, through the courtesy of their editors : 

Aruona Citizen, East Los Angeles CiUzeOy 

Arizona Bepablican, Music and Dnuna, 

Bee Culture, Oakland Tribune^ 

Book Chat, Omaha Bee, 

California, Oregon Statesnum, 

California Volks Freund (Ger- Parish Churchman, 

man,) Patent Office Gazette, U. 8., 

Cause, Bedlands Citrograph, 

Christian Leader, Poultry in California, 

Crown Vista, Beyista Hispano Americano 
Deutsche Zeitung (German) (Spanish) 

"EL Monitor Mexicano (Span- Bural Califomian, 

ish), Sacramento Becord-Union, 

Esoteric, San Francisco Call, 

Industry, Science and Horticulture, 

La Cronica (Italian), Seed, 

Le GhiuloiB (French), So. California Pactitioner, 

Le Progress (French), Southwest, 

L' Union NouYelle (French), Students' Journal, 

Los Angeles Commecial Bui- Sud California Post (German), 

letin, Tacoma Ledger, 

.Los Angeles Evening Express, Twentieth Century, 

two copies, Union Signal, 

Xios Angeles Herald, two copies, Unitarian Beyiew, 

Los Angeles Sunday World, Visalia Delta, 

Los Angeles Times, two copies. Voice. 



If^ ^ 4 ^ 'f-' - ^' 



: A 







HNNUKL- REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Directors 



OF THE 



Co8 Ap^elcs public library 



AND 



Report of Librarian. 



■ 

A 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 



\ 




I 

I 



LOB ANCELC9 CITY HALL. 

LIBIWBV OOOUPIEB THl THIBD 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Directors 



OF THE 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A2ID 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN, 



December^ j8ga. 



LOS AKGSLBS, CAUFOBMIA: 
EV£KIltO XXPREBB COMPABT, FBIHTERfi, 

1892. 



r , V 



'^^ 



>• 



JAN ]o 'i;93 



^1 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRffiRY, 



DIRECTORS. 

G. A. DoBiNSON, PrendeTU. 
J. Mills Davies. Faank H. Howabd. 

Geo. H. Smith. Mbs. G. M. Sevebance. 



COMMITTEES. 

• 

Books and Donationa. 

G. H. Smith, G. A. Dobikson, 

F. H. Howabd. 

Euki and Begvlations, 
Mbs. C. M. Seyebance, G. H. Smith, G. A. Dobiitoom. 

PrtTUing and SupplU», 
J. Mills Davies, Mbs. 0. M. Sevbbance, G. A. Dobinson. 

Auditing and Accounts, 

F. H. Howabd, G. A, Dobinson, 

J. Mills Davies. 

AU/gndajUs. 
G. A. Dobinson, Mbs. C. M. Sevebance, F. H. Howabd. 



Tbssa L. Kelso, Librarian. 
Adelaide R. Hasse, First Assistant, 
Lena B. Fenneb, Second Assistant, 

Attendants : 

Estelle Haines, Cobinne Wise, 

Celia Gleason, Mattie Tedfobd, 

Nellie Russ, Leila Kinoslet, 

Blanche Beville, Habbiet Mebceb, 

Helen Kimball, Bebtha Piebce, 

Elizabeth Fabgo, Anna Austin, 

Stella Walkeb, Flobence Thobnbebo, 

Maboabet Loqan, Noba Milleb. 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Los Angeles Public Library. 



December, 1892. 



To the Honorable Council of the City of Los Angeles : 

Gentlemen: — ^In accordance with the provisions of 
the City Charter the Board of Directors of the Public 
Library of this City begs to present herewith its fourth 
annual report, embracing an account of the progress of 
the institution for the past year, and of its present con- 
dition, together with a somewhat detailed statement 
of its immediate needs; to all of which the Board respect- 
fully invites your careful perusal, referring your Honor- 
able Body to the detailed report of the librarian hereto 
annexed, which is made a part of this report and em- 
bodies the statistical and other information necessary to 
a complete understanding of this department of the 
educational system of our city. 

Referring to the statement in our last annual report to 
the effect that an appeal had been taken to the Supreme 
Court of this State from a decision of the Superior Court 
of this County which sustained the validity of the 
Mayor's appointment of the Library Directors, we will 
here state, to make the record complete, that the Supreme 
Court in due course affirmed the decision of Judge Lucien 
Shaw and thus disposed forever of any question as to the 
legality of the Mayor's appointments. 



6 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

In reviewing the figures furnished by the librarian, 
the one fact which stands prominently out, and to an 
extent over-shadows everything else, is that the public sen- 
timent has been unequivocally expressed in favor of main- 
taining this institution at the highest point of efficiency. 
From the first we have had no doubtthat a well furnished 
and well managed library would, in due time, attract its 
thousands of readers, but we must confess our surprise 
and gratification at the rapidity with which our hopes 
have been not only accomplished but surpassed. The 
latest reports from the principal libraries in the country 
show that no matter what the size of the population, or 
the number of books on their library shelves, that Los 
Angeles stands sixth on the roll of honor in the United 
States in the number of volumes (233,368) actually taketi 
out for home reading in the course of a single yean This 
fact we regard as the most thoroughly convincing proof, 
if any such were needed, of the culture and intellectual 
ambition of a city's population. 

While not expecting that the past ratio of increase 
will be maintained in the year to come, it is evident that 
the interest of the public, now thoroughly aroused, and 
its consequent growing demands for assistance in all the 
departments of literary study and recreation must be 
met in a manner commensurate with the dignity and 
.wealth of this municipality. Our shelves are already 
crowded and our accomodations, even after the utmost 
economy of space has been used, are today insufficient 
for the public needs; the limited space at the delivery 
counter is overcrowded, our reference room needs space 
for more tables to accomodate students, and our work 
room requires at least an a'partment double the size of 
the one now in use. We have to advise your Honorable 
Body that some steps must be taken without loss of time 
to increase the facilities for handling the large volume of 
business which is daily crowding upon our staff. As a 
temporary measure we suggest that the rooms now occu* 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 7 

pied by the Board of Education for their private offices 
on the library floor be turned over to the use of this 
library, and as a measure of further immediate relief we 
desire to establish four delivery stations at appropriate 
points in the city from which books may be distributed, 
thereby lessening th^ pressure which is now at one focal 
point. To do this however, will require the apportion- 
ment of a special sum of money, say about $2,600. We 
urge these suggestions most strenuously on the ground 
that something must be done; and in order that the 
matter may receive proper attention we beg that your 
Honorable Body will appoint a committee to investigate 
our claims, and after conference with this Board to report 
to you their conclusions in the premises. 

During the past year the question of erecting a suita- 
ble library building has been widely discussed and the 
unanimous conclusion seems to have been reached that 
the city should, by the issuance of bonds, provide itself 
with a substantial edifice sufficiently large for the library 
4md also providing accommodation for a public museum, 
a combination which suggests itself to the mind of any 
intelligent person as being exactly suited to the needs of 
a city like ours. With a growing population, comprising 
in addition to the people of wealth and culture who come 
to us from the inhospitable East to seek the healthful 
breezes of our balmy clime, a larger growth comprehend- 
ing the flower of youth now maturing in our public 
schools and seminaries, it becomes a matter of stern 
necessity that the means of higher education shall be 
placed where they can be reached by rich and poor alike. 
The museum feature once started will attract from their 
hiding places a wealth of relics of the highest value in 
preserving a record of the progress of our State and city ; 
and the existence of such a repository in connection with 
the library and with the additional safeguards which 
municipal ownership and control spread around it, 
would encourage our wealthy citizens to emulate the 



8 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

example of the rich in other cities who have aided the 
cause of public education by noble benefactions. 

Several places have been suggested as suitable for a 
museum and library building of the kind described, and 
among others the Sixth Street Park, the small park on 
the north side of the City Hall and the lot now occupied 
by the Spring Street School may be cited on account of 
their ownership by the city, but it may be possible that 
some one of our landed proprietors might solve the diffi- 
culty in a practical way by a donation that would serve 
to establish a monument of a most enduring kind to his 
memory. 

In our last annual report we mentioned that we had 
just begun the experiment of admitting pupils to a 
training class in library work who were to give their 
services gratuitously for six months in return for instruc- 
tion that might qualify them, after examination, for such 
employment here or elsewhere. We were convinced that 
this course of training would not only be a help to the 
library in obtaining trained attendants as needed, but 
would also be of the greatest benefit to every pupil who 
should pass the examination, in giving her the kind of 
knowledge that would be useful to her in any business 
walk of life. The experiment, we are glad to say, has 
been attended with complete success, and we have now 
employed on our paid staff no less than six young 
women who have obtained certificates of proficiency by 
this method and who are now doing creditable work in 
the library. 

This Board takes the credit for inaugurating this sys- 
tem of pupil training and consequent appointment 
and promotion according to civil service rules, no ap- 
pointments to the staff being made except from the 
number of certificated pupils. 

This Board has also by unanimous resolution adopted 
the system of extra payment to all members of the staff 
of attendants who may be employed on Sundays and 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 9 

other legal holidays, on which days the reading-rooms 
only are to be kept open from the hours of 1 to 9 p. m. 
This is an extension of the hours during which the 
library was formerly kept open on such days, and the 
new schedule will go into effect on the 1st day of January 
next. 

The Board has heretofore recognized in fitting terms 
the zealous and efiicient service rendered by Miss Kelso, 
the librarian, and her staff of assistants ; and now takes 
pleasure in confirming all that it has formerly said on 
this subject. The high place which the library holds in 
public estimation is maintained by the untiring exertions 
of the librarian, aided by the intelligent co-operation of 
every member of the staff. The Board «ee8 with pleasure 
the existence of an united spirit which has made it 
possible to compass the work of the varied departments 
without undue friction and with the largest amount of 
satisfaction to the public, which has been gratified at the 
prompt and courteous manner in which its wants have 
ever been responded to. 

To the press of the city the library is under continued 
obligations for the publication of news of interest to its 
large army of nearly ten thousand cardholders who are 
the most active patrons of the institution ; and for 
support on those occasions when the question of a liberal 
financial appropriation has been before the public and 
urged upon your Honorable Body. 

The Board also desires to thank the donors to the 
library of sundry books and pamphlets of general interest 
and especially the Very Rev. Father Adam and Richard 
Egan, Esq., for very valuable donations of scarce works 
on California. 

Respectfully submitted, 
By order of the Board of Directors, 
Attest : G. A. Dobinson, President. 

T. L. Kblso, Clerk. 

Los Angeles, Cal., 10th December, 1892. 



10 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN. 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angelef Public 
Library : 

I have the honor to sabmit to you my fourth annual 
report, a record of the work of the library from Ifit 
December, 1891, to Ist December, 1892, as follows: 

The City Council app6rtioned to the Library Fund 
for the fiscal year, 1st August, 1892, to 1st August, 1893, 
the sum of $17,668, being three and nine-tenth cents, 
considerably less than the limit fixed by the city charter 
which allows five cents on each one hundred dollars of 
all taxable property. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Library Fund 
for the past year are as follows: 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand 30th Noyember, 1892 |3,062 57 

Received balance of apportionment, fiscal year, 

1891-92. $8,520 55 

Received on account of apportionment, 1892-93.. 6,240 00 

114,760 55 

Dues I 27 00 

Fines 633 32 

1662 82 

Duplicate books sold I 88 70 

Finding lists sold 156 40 

Cards, guides, etc., sold to State Normal School... 14 40 

$259 50 

$19,644 94 



am 



f 



LOB ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 11 

KXPEIKDITUBES. 

Books and Periodigaus $7,982 78 

Library Expgnses — 

Printing.^ |302 30 

Annual report 42 00 

Three bnlletins (Aug., Oct, Nov.) 159 76 

Stationery and rapplies. 430 34 

Sandries, pett J expenses... 85o 54 

Furniture and Fixtures^ 

Gas fixtures and plumbing $32 84 

Information desk 96 97 

Carpentering and repairs 108 39 

8to(^ 20 26 

Two typewriters 150 00 

Sundries 44 75 

1463 20 

Serrice Boyle Heights Library, 11 months fllO 00 

$1,853 13 

fLibraiy staff. $8972 85 

Salaries < 

t Janitor 780 00 

$9,752 25 

Balance in hands of City Treasurer 56 68 

$19,644 94 

BOOK BORROWERS. 

The registration has begun to show the falling off 
that w.a8 to be expected after the first rash when the 
library was made entirely free. The total registration 
from 1st September, 1889, to 1st December, 1892, has 
been 11,253, of whom 4,495 were male and 6^758 female. 
The members actually drawing books Ist December, 
1892, numbers 9,956. 

The registration has been going on for three years and 
the necessity of determining the live membership became 
apparent. In September last the question of re-registra- 
tion was considered, and it was decided that such a plan 
was undesirable as entailing much annoyance and loss 
of time ; to re-register also deprives a borrower of a card 
number that has come to be regarded as a piece of per- 
sonal property and its familiarity facilitates the issuing 



12 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

of books and serves as a means of identification in the 
misuse of cards. To avoid these disadvantages a system 
of checking was devised whereby ''dead cards'* were 
canceled from the membership index, the certificates of 
guarantors for borrowers were re-arranged so as to be 
self-indicating as to expiration, and to permit notices for 
renewal to be sent each day as they fall due. It is 
intended to make the library available to any one desir- 
ing books, without regard to residence, and the following 
rules have been found to cover all cases : 

No. 1. — Any resident over 12 years of age by furnish- 
ing guarantee of city taxpayer, good for two years, may 
become a member. 

No. 2. — In lieu of furnishing guarantee, a deposit of 
15.00 may be made, entitling the depositor to the priv- 
ileges of the library. 

No. 3. — Non-residents paying city taxes may become 
members by furnishing evidence of such payment, and 
also giving the usual guarantee. 

No. 4, — Non-residents not paying city taxes are re- 
quired to pay a quarterly fee of $1.50 and to furnish 
security in regular manner, or in case of depositing value 
of book must pay 10 cents per day for the use of the book. 

BOOKS. 

The following statement shows the book account of 

the library : 

Number of yokiiiief in library 1st December, 1891 25,140 

Number of volumes accessioned to Ist December, 1892 5,420 

Total 30,560 

Worn out 325 

Lost and paid for 22 

Discarded 60 

Missing 23 

Documents returned to Washington 741 

Total 1,171 

Total number of books in library 1st December, 1892 29.389 



LOB ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



13 



The number of books worn out is much greater than 
ever before, due to the exceptional use of special classes of 
books. The following detailed statements show the con- 
tents of the library : 

CliASSIFIBD CONTENTS OF CIRCUIiATING 

DEPARTMENT. 



CI^ASS. 

PhiloBophj 

Religion..'. 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arte 

Fine Arts 

Literature , 

Histoiy.^ 

Trayels 

Biography , 



VOLS. 



438 

901 

1»085 

122 

991 

583 

592 

1,871 

1,394 

1,237 

1,617 



CLASS. 



Fiction 

JuYenile Fiction 

Pacific SUtee 

Music 

French 

Qerman 

Spanish 

Italian 

Bound Periodicals.... 
Unbound Periodicals 



VOLS. 



6,221 
1,792 
252 
559 
645 
236 
208 
224 
446 
141 



CLASSIFIED CONTENTS OF REFERENCE 

DEPARTMENT. 



CLASS. 


VOLS. 


CLASS. 


VOLS. 


BiblioflEranhy 


259 
246 
146 

64 
135 

12 
118 

45 

78 
118 


History 


100 


KncYCiODeduM 


Travels 


91 


Pictionaries 


Biosraphy 


31 


Religion 


m^a.t^^» mm^ mm J ......... .*■....... 

Pacific States 


81 


SociolofTT 


Spanish 


24 


Fhilolo^ 


Bound Periodicals. 


2,653 


NaturaTocience 


Public Documents. 


3,638 
104 


Useful Arts 


Mape.M..... 


Fine Arts 


NewsDaners 


82 


Literature... 







In addition to the above there are 478 duplicate 
volumes on hand. The classes which received the largest 
number of additions were : Fiction, 1,744 volumes, of 
which 762 were added in November. Reference Maga- 
zines, 522 volumes ; Juvenile Fiction, 377 volumes ; 
Sociology, 827 volumes ; History, 288 volumes ; Travels, 
218 volumes. 



REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

CIRCUULTIOK OF BOOKS. 

la DeeemUr, 1S9I, lo IM Dt<seaA*r, 1S9S. 



December... 

Janaarr 

Februftry 

April. '.".'.!!!!! 
M»7 

ju"^. !;.:!::'.; 

September... 

Ocbiber 

November.... 

Toial 



16,740 (30 
IMM 30 
19,S8tJ '29 
21,003 !31 
19,eil 130 
19,306 l3I 
19,028 
19,316 



7,oe 

7,466 

7,678 
7,094 
7,500 



I 92.736 326,099 . 



2,4.)1 30,4S0 

2,3SS 31,461 

1,870 28,534 

1,791 28,562 

2,046 28,662 

1,899 28,309 

1,784 29,646 

2,295 29,970 

3,154 31,071 

3.006 31,667 

27,091 363.190 

The circulating department, consietiDg of but 21,505 
volumee and sustaining the enormous pressure of an 
average monthly issue of 30,CtO volumes, is susceptible 
of further improvement. The accommodations afforded 
the public in the book -room are becoming seriously in- 
Bufficient, and this limitation has not been without its 
effect upon the promptness of the service. 

The books in the reference department are on open 
shelves for the use of the public, and figures given are 
for the number of persons who used the room for the 
purpose of study. 

The progress in the usefulness of the library cannot be 
better expressed than in the following comparative table 
of the home circulation of books : 



MOXTH. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 




1.415 

2,277 
2,010 


4,701 

i330 
8,025 


15,686 
16,22> 
16,129 


19.847 













These records were first begun 8ept«mber, 1889, when 
the library was moved into its present quartet's. The 



LOS ANQELEfi PUBLIC LIBRARY. 15 

home issue of books was 110,263 io 18SI. against 233,3(13 
for 1892. The classified character of the reading for the 
past year is as follows : 





i 


.i 


1 




So. Tlmeii ew!h 


CLxasincATioir. 


1^ 


|j 


1 




1 

18 

IS 

« 
13 
S 

7 

9 

18 

14 
.8 
13 
« 

13 


1,261 

1A*7 

1,766 

631 

3,271 

2,319 

2,339 

3,887 

2,538 

2,866 

2,63» 

10,481 

8,669 

46,363 

632 

787 

632 

288 

42 


8,132 
4,696 
4,407 
820 
7,721 
4,417 
6.732 

11,602 
8,256 

12.335 

S,368 

130.829 

42,362 

70,247 
3,660 
3^550 
i;741 
1,304 
j36 


438 
901 
1,036 
122 
901 
683 
5»2 
1.871 
1,394 
1,237 
1,617 
6,221 
1,792 

669 
645 
236 
208 
234 


4 
3 
2 
2 

1 


2 
1 

1 
4 
8 




ReiiSoi. „.■;:.■;::;::::::::: 










6i 






,J' 




8 ' 4 

4 ! 2 
4 1 2 






Hiitory 




TniMiL 




Bio|r™phy.. 


5' 

19j 
19 

5 

4 


1 
1 


-? 










fd^czzzzz'z'.::.' 












Spanish 


6 I 
2-6 1-5 














233,363 


82,736 


326,009 



















This table affords one of the most interesting presenta- 
tions of figaree in a report ; here we find quality predom- . 
inating over quantity, and in these records the develop- 
ment of taste and culture may be traced. The report of 
last year showed that immediately upon the library being 
made free the use of serious books in the reading rooms 
showed a falling off, as people could take such books 
home to be read. 

ComparisoDB of last year's circulation with this year's 
show that the class Fine Arts had a circulation equal to 5^ 
times for every book in the class, this year it is equal to 10 
times ; Spanish books circulated 3 timee for every book 
last year and 6 for this year ; Music, 3} last against 6 
times this year ; Natural Bcience, &i against 8 times this 



16 REPORT W BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

year ; Philosophy reached 7 this year for 5| times in 
1891 ; the least gain being in Sociology, 3^ last year, 4 
times this ; and Religion being 4 times for each book 
last year, but in juvenile fiction the increase was to 23 
from 20 in 1891 ; that it was no larger is due to the selec- 
tions made by teachers for the use of their pupils. The 
total circulation for 20,918 volumes (which does not 
include bound and current periodicals) is 255,852. This 
shows that each book has circulated 12 times : home 
use, 10 ; library use, 2. 

There are some curious phases of reading room use of 
books, an instance being the fact that 632 volumes of 
music were drawn for use in the general reading room. 
That much serious study was done outside of the reference 
room during the past year is shown by the number of 
books drawn in such classes as Religion, Natural Science, 
etc., the realization of this fact led to the purchase of a 
duplicate set of the Encyclopedia Britannica, a dictionary 
and an atlas, which were placed on open shelves in the 
reading room. 

In last year's report an attempt was made to show the 
degree of popularity of certain books ; since then all 
records of this kind have been abandoned, as involving 
too much time even if the figures could be made correctly. 
In such averages allowance would have to be made for 
the extent to which popular books are duplicated, also 
whether subject to seven day, two weeks*, or four weeks' 
time limitations, and the ratio of fiction to the other 
classes in use; and altogether it is an expensive and 
finally unsatisfactory, if not useless, method to determine 
the value of a book either to the library or to the reader. 
The percentage of fiction is also unimportant as showing 
the value or real usefulness of a library, provided the 
rule is strictly adhered to not to permit books of dubious 
moral effect, or trashy, ill-written or fiabby ones on the 
shelves. To afford a means of healthy amusement is one 
of the library^s greatest privileges. The misuse of books 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 17 

is in the tendency of young people to read too many 
books, but there are many ways of checking this, and 
energy expended at this point accomplishes much more 
permanent good than trying to keep down the number of 
books drawn by confirmed ** fiction fiends." 

The point of greatest importance is to introduce 
people to the use of books, to promote the evolution from 
poor books to better; and finally to good books as an 
inevitable consequence. 

DISTRIBUTION OF BOOKS THROUGH THE 

SCHOOLS. 

The plan of circulating books by means of school dis- 
tribution has been in operation one year and has given 
great satisfaction to all concerned, the only drawback 
being the lack of books. Each teacher is entitled to 
twenty books per month under our agreement, but it is 
seldom that ten each can be obtained. ^ 

The method of distribution adopted has been found to 
work well. The plan is to divide the public schools of the 
city into four districts, each district exchanging their 
books once a month; the books being collected on 
Tuesdays and delivered on Wednesdays; the expense 
of transportation is born by the School Fund, their Sup- 
erintendent of Buildings with the help of one man doing 
the work in two days of each week. 

The teachers are supplied with Finding Lists and 
Bulletins, and may send in their call slips from the 
schools^ but since the beginning of the present school 
year teachers have been permitted to have access to the 
shelves and select their books; although an inconvenience 
to the library the marked increase of interest more than 
justifies this advantage, for teachers that had never taken 
an interest before now come and spend hours 'in looking 
over the contents of the library to select material for 
schoolroom work. 

No restrictions are placed upon the use of the books 

2 



18 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

after passing into the hands of the teacher; books may 
be used just as she sees fit, the only requirement being 
that the books must be returned from the teacher to 
whom issued. 

The use of the mounted pictures, (colored and un- 
colored supplements of periodicals) has been unusually 
satisfactory, the method of mounting is speedy and 
cheap ; each teacher is entitled to three plates^ and they 
are more in demand than books, serving for composition 
and language studies. 

The statistics for the work are as follows: 

Total number of schools drawing books 33 

AVest Los Angeles District Schools 10 

Angeleno Heights District " 8 

Boyle Heights District ** 6 

East Los Angeles District " 9 

Number of teachers employed Ist February, 1892 212 

" " drawing books Ist June, 1892 Ill 

" " employed Ist October, 1892.. 233 

" '' drawing books Ist December, 1892 123 

CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 

February, 4 deliveries 1194 

March, 4 " 875 

April, 3 " 683 

May, 5 " 745 

June, 1 " 249 

October, 3 " 604 

November, 4 " 952 

DELIVERY STATIONS. 

The Boyle Heights Library Association distributed 
1355 volumes with one delivery per week for a period of 
ten months. In October last the ladies of the association 
concluded to close their reading room, and discontinue 
their work. Since this was done numerous cards have 
been surrendered by people who could not afford the 
time or money necessary to reach the library. It is to 
this very class that the library should be most useful, 
and the only means of accomplishing this is to distribute 



LOS ANQELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 19 

books from different points of the city by means of 
delivery stations; our city covers so much ground that 
this seems especially necessary. Free distribution of 
library books has become as much a necessity as free 
delivery of letters, and as such has been widely adopted 
by other cities. 

PERIODICALS. 

The following apportionment is made of the 403 
periodicals regularly received : 

On file in the readinK rooms * 187 

On file at the periodical desk 141 

For use at home 75 

Total 403 

During the past year a separate desk has been estab- 
lished in the delivery room for periodicals for use in the 
library reading rooms and as a general information desk. 
Its establishment has relieved the overcrowded delivery 
counter and aflorded opportunity to answer questions 
and explain the library classification and finding list to 
new members more fully than was possible under the old 
arrangement. 

The conclusion arrived at some two years ago to 
retain only the leading newspapers of the country on our 
subscription list has proven a justifiable one, the room 
has been gained for better use and the objectionable 
features of a " newspaper room " removed, while all of its 
advantages remain. Of the newspapers taken, care is 
used to have a leading newspaper from different sections 
of the country and of different political standpoints. 
The papers are carefully preserved and the library now 
possesses files of the leading newspapers for the past four 
years, which are greatly in demand, being the only ones 
in Southern California. 

The following periodicals are for home use in their 
current and bound form : 



20 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



PERIODICAL. 



Arena 

Atlantic 

Californian 

Century.... 

Coemopolitan , 

Critic 

Current Literature... 

Eclectic .» 

Forum 

Harper's Magazyie 

Harper's Young People. 
Illustrated American.... 

Kindergarten 

Lippincott 



COPIES 
EIYEP. 


COPIES 


oH 


6^ 


6 


4 


4 


2 


2 


2 


21 


6 


8 


4 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 


2 


3 


2 


21 


6 


10 


11 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 



PERIODICAL. 




Nation 

New England Magazine. 

Nineteenth Century 

North Am. Review 

Outing 

Our Little Men & Women 

Overland 

Pop. Scienoe Monthly.... 
Rev. of Reviews (N, Y.) 
Rev. of Reviews (Lond.) 

Scribner's Magazine 

St. Nicholas 

Wide Awake 

Youth's Com panion 



1 
I 
1 
7 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 

17 
9 
5 
4 



6 S 

1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 

e 

10 
6 
6 



In addition to the above named periodicals that are 
taken for circulation purposes alone, all of the periodicals 
in the library except some six or seven, may be taken 
home until time for binding; this arrangement was put 
into operation in January of last year and has been a 
much appreciated privilege. If any single number is 
found to be unfit for binding it is a very small matter to 
replace it, compared to the usefulness it has had in being 
made available for home use. In this manner many of 
the rarely read heavy periodicals have for the first time 
paid for themselves in their unbound state. To keep a 
reference room up to date a library must take quantities 
of periodicals that have little or no demand in the read- 
ing rooms, and such an arrangement as the one described 
justifies the expense of their care. The fashion maga- 
zines which had never justified their expense now have a 
balance of usage to their credit. In fact the circulation 
of magazines in a library is one of the most important 
factors of success. 

The weeklies and larger magazines, the Art Amateur 
Art Interchange plates are sent out from the library in a 
cover of duck made like a music roll, a cheap and effect- 
ive means of handling them. 



LOB ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 21 

BINDING AND REPAIRING. 

The binding expense has been particularly heavy the 
past year owing to the meager supply of fiction and 
juvenile books) the total number of volumes rebound was 
2,980, of which 1,668 volumes were fiction, the cost of 
binding being 85 cents per volume for the latter. 

Every volume of this number had to be collated, tags 
of instructions to the binder prepared and pasted in the 
book, entered in a binding book and checked on return, and 
it is worthy of note that but one volume was lost in all this 
handling. No small part of the work of this department is 
the filing arrangement of periodicals awaiting completion 
of volumes to be bound. The 8,600 copies constantly on 
hand must be kept in such order as to permit of as prompt 
finding for delivery purposes as in the books themselves. 

Besides the large number of books sent to the bindery 
14,966 volumes were repaired in the library work-room 
by the regular staff. 

REFSRENCE ROOM. 

The large number of students who have visited this 
room necessitated the constant presence of two attendants, 
and from the hours of 3 to 5 p. m. daily, a third attendant. 
While the books are on open shelves for the use of the 
public, it is a fact that not one person in ten knows how 
to use reference books intelligently where there are so 
many to choose from, and here the trained assistant can 
wonderfully facilitate matters. 

To this department are due some of the best results of 
the past year's work in the preparation of special biblio- 
graphies and reading lists. The numerous reading and 
literary clubs of this city have come to think of the 
library as the first aid in their work; most of such 
societies file their programs and outlines of study, and 
the subjects are thoroughly looked up, the lists put on 
cards, to be afterward inserted in the card catalog, and 
in some cases cyclostyle copies are printed for use in the 



22 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

societies' rooms and at the delivery desk. The time 
expended in preparing these lists for the reference depart- 
ment is repaid many times over by the saving at the 
delivery desk, in the attendants there having a complete 
list of available literature on the specified subjects. 
Teachers and leaders in such work are invited to come to 
the library, go among the shelves and explain their 
plans so that the library may be made useful in every 
way. In exceptional cases books may be taken home for 
inspection, and it is the aim to have people understand that 
there is no such thing as too much trouble in such work. 
Some of the more extensively used lists were those on Arch- 
aeology; Astronomy: Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn; Beetho- 
ven; Behring Sea controversy; California, (history, maps, 
poetry, fiction and missions); .Geo. W. Gable; Christmas, 
(poems, stories); Columbus; Dante; Decoration Day; 
Education; Geology: Ice Age, Glaciers, Moraines (Uni- 
versity Extension Course); Hamlin Garland; Kennan; 
Liszt; Lowell; Mediaeval History (University Extension 
Course); Mendelssohn; Music; Persia; Physical Culture; 
Political Economy; Protection and Free Trade; James 
W. Riley; Tennyson; University Extension Movement; 
Whitman; Whittier; Wood -engraving; Volapuk; etc., etc. 

BEADIKO BOOM. 

The general reading room and newspaper room, while 
more generally used by men and boys, is quite extensively 
patronized by women, and it is worthy of comment that 
these rooms, although entirely unattended and ruled by 
but two notices, viz: "Gentlemen will remove their hats" 
and "No newspaper may be retained by one person 
longer than 15 minutes if wanted by any one else," 
utmost decorum and quiet prevails, occasion for reproof 
being very rare. 

The women's reading room is exceptionally well 
patronized, and aside from the reminder that " the room 
is for the use of readers and not for the use of conversa- 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 23 

• 

tionalists," its goverDment is left to the discretion of the 
ladies who occupy it. The means of entertainment 
afforded by the reading rooms of this library with the 
large attendance, not only of our citizens but also of the 
hundreds of strangers constantly visiting our city, has 
at -various times called forth gratifying expressions for 
this accommodation. As a public reception room, a 
place provided by the city where the stranger may feel 
he is officially recognized and welcomed, these reading 
rooms may be the means of pleasantly impressing the 
traveler with a feeling of extended hospitality. 

WORK BOOM. 

That some idea may be conveyed of the cramped 
quarters at our disposal in which to carry on the 
mechanical work of the library, it is only necessary to 
state that the work room is but 13x34 feet; in that 
space are the tables for four typewriters, a table for the 
use of the cataloger and accession clerk, one for the 
repairing of books, and two for the renewing and check- 
ing of periodicals, and the mailing of the bulletin. The 
entire stock of blanks in use in the different departments 
is stored here. Into this room come all books received 
by the library, and every step in a book's progress from 
receipt to shelf takes place here. In twelve months 
14,966 books were wheeled on the book trucks into this 
room for repairs, and wheeled out again; and every book 
on its return from the bindery was taken into this room. 
The disturbance and noise of book trucks and four type- 
writers in operation at once certainly is nerve exhausting, 
and some means of relief from such a state of affairs 
should be afforded. In this one small room, which is 
itself but a part of the hall partitioned off, are crowded 
six or eight people, every one working under a great dis- 
advantage, and their work must necessarily suffer. 

SUNDAY AND HOLIDAY OPENING. 

The reference room and reading rooms are open from 
1 to 6 p. M. Sunday. The total circulation for the year 



24 REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

was 5,993, an average of 117 per Sunday. The visitors 
to the reading rooms numbered 72d women, 4,159 men 
and 1,106 children. For the first half of the year 1891 
the total was 3,428; for the second half 2,565, the 
attendance being less for the summer months. 

The result of the entire closing of the library on 
Christmas, New Year's, Fourth of July and Thanksgiving 
Day, during the past year, is a return to the first convic- 
tion that a public library should be open every day in 
the year. 

The greatest percentage of readers on Sundays and 
holidays has been from those persons who spend most of 
their time in the library every day, a class that is excep- 
tionally large in our city. The character of reading is 
largely for mere amusement, still there is no doubt that 
a library here has a chance for influence by always having 
its doors open, which must outweigh other considera* 
tions. The plan of keeping the reading rooms and 
reference department open on Sundays and holidays from 
1 to 9 p. M., as is now proposed, will be an improvement 
on the old schedule. 

GATALOGINO. 

In March of the present year work was begun on a 
dictionary card catalog, with Cutter's rules as the guide. 
The standard L. B. card 33xp is used, the work being 
done on the Hammond typewriters. It is the intention 
to make, as time and money may afford, a dictionary 
card catalog, author, title, and subject with numerous 
cross references; a catalog that will be used by thfB 
specialist, the student, and the general seeker after 
knowledge. 

With this end in view the books comprising the 
classes history, geography and travel, and music, over 
3,300 volumes in all, have been fully cataloged, the cards 
for the same numbering over 10,000. For the 555 vol- 
umes of music, 2,500 cards were made. This was found 
rather difficult, there being no similar work or guide for 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 25 

reference. In the instrumental music entry is made 
imder composer, title and instrument, i. e, piano, violin, 
etc. In the vocal scores entry is made under composer 
of both music and words, title and form, i. e, opera, 
cantata, etc. The language or languages of the text of 
the various scores are noted. Where the opera was known 
by several titles, the best known was selected, and refer- 
ence made to it from the other titles. 

The fiction card catalog, with full author and title 
(including analytical short story) entry, comprises some 
12,000 cards and is kept up to date. This, together with 
the juvenile card catalog has been in constant use 
for the past three years. It is much worn and soiled, 
and ought to be revised and rewritten at once. Beside 
the regular card catalog work, short author and title 
entry is made for every new book received, excepting 
fiction where author entry only is made. This comprises 
the supplement to the printed Finding List, and serves as 
a copy for the bulletin lists printed monthly. Some 
8,000 entries have been made during the year, 3,200 
of which have been printed in the bulletin (now to Oct.) 
and some 4,000 more remain to be printed before this 
present series is out. 

In this work, from March of this year, the cataloger 
has been assisted irregularly by the reference depart- 
ment attendant, together with two students from the 
training class. In May a special half-day attendant 
was appointed to assist, and in August an additional 
assistant for the same time was appointed. From the 
first of this present month, they were each given full 
day service. Both assistants have given cataloging 
especial study while in the training class, and are now 
competent to render valuable assistance. Two new type- 
writers have just been purchased for use in this depart- 
ment. The assistants also do the writing of the special 
reference lists and order lists. 

Two thousand copies of the present Finding List were 



26 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

printed in July, 1891, at a cost of 34^ cents each. Dur- 
ing the eighteen months since it was printed the sales 
have amounted to more than half the cost of printing, 
being sold for 25 cents each. These together with the 
copies distributed to the city schools and the libraries of 
the country have reduced the stock on hand to 200 copies. 
From the above figures it seems advisable, urgent indeed, 
that work should begin very ^oon on a new Finding List, 
much on the same plan as the one now in use but neces- 
sarily larger, 10,000 books having been added to the 
library, and somewhat fuller in scope. We have only 
made a beginning in cataloging. The work has been 
slow, new books constantly coming in, and the pressure 
of other work being great. 

The first number of the Library Bulletin, a sixteen- 
page pamphlet, was issued in November, 1891 ; at that 
time the Finding List had just been issued, and the card 
catalogue being a thing of the future, a bulletin was 
decided upon as affording the best medium for making 
known the current accessions to the library. The design 
was to issue the Bulletin monthly, the expense to be borne 
by a publisher, who was to have six pages to use for 
advertisements, which were to be approved by the Board 
of Directors of the library. Ten pages were to be used 
for the library matter. Owing to delays on the part of 
the publisher, but seven numbers have appeared during 
the year, but the usefulness of such a direct medium of 
communication with book borrow^ers has been thoroughly 
proven; 8,000 copies of each issue are gratuitously dis- 
tributed ; each number contains four pages of the supple- 
ment to the Finding List aside from lists on special 
topics or classified subject lists. By this means oppor- 
tunity is afforded to call attention to classes of books not 
generally in use. 

The desirability of issuing such a Bulletin having 
been fully established, it is suggested that the drawbacks 
of the present method could be overcome by dispensing 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 27 

• 

ynih all advertising pages, and that the library itself 
assume the expense of issuing a Bulletin monthly. T he 
present contract expires in February, 1893, at which 
time the experiment could be made. 

ULBBABY STAFF. 

The regular staff of employes now numbers twenty 
persons, Librarian, First Assistant, Second Assistant, 
twelve day attendants, four night attendants, and the 
janitress. All the employes are women. Every duty of 
whatever character has been cheerfully and promptly 
executed, and it has been fuUv demonstrated that as 
high a standard can be maintained in this work by 
women as by men. 

In the entire year there has been but a very slight 
loss of time on account of sickness, and the tardy per- 
centage has been a very low one. 

Six attendants have been appointed during the year, 
all of whom had obtained their qualification in the 
library training class. The entrance examination to the 
class, three hours' service per day for six months without 
pay, a final examination with an average of 70 per cent., 
entitles the examinee to a certificate, and makes her 



eligible for employment in the ratio of her percentage, in 
cases of temporary or permanent vacancy. 

The advantage to the library in having a trained 
supply to draw upon for employment has been fiilly 
demonstrated, and since librarianship has come to be a 
recognized profession it properly demands study and 
practical experience before paid service can be expected. 

The system of having the borrowers come in direct 
contact with the attendant who gets their books tends to 
establish an understanding and interest between them, 
which wonderfully increases a library's popularity. The 
service at the delivery desk is, and always has been, the 
test of efiiciency in this library. Some of the best results 
of access to the shelves may be accomplished by this 
factor, and by practical emphasis here we have been 



28 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

enabled to hold a percentage of the public as members 
that we could not otherYrise hope to reach. Three years' 
trial of this system of concentrating the best talent of the 
library at its most vital point has demonstrated that a 
library may be made a direct power in intellectual 
development, and also, that nowhere else in its admin- 
istration is such nice discrimination necessary as in 
meeting the public at the delivery desk. Catalog making 
and many other elaborate record systems may be sub- 
ordinated, so long as the library presents its best material 
in an intelligent, well-trained desk force. 

Two important factors in keeping alive the interest 
and enthusiasm of the whole staff have been the library 
club and the training class. There were seven meetings 
of the club held during the year, in the library rooms, 
with an average attendance of 35, comprising librarians 
from neighboring towns, teachers of the Normal,' High, 
Intermediate, and private schools and others interested 
in books and educational matters. 

Some of the more important papers and discussions 
were ''(Jeneral Bibliographical Guides," '^Library Legisla- 
tion in California," ^'Symposium on Supplementary Read- 
iag Schools," *' Classification in a Library," " Compara- 
tive Value of Periodicals," ** Accounts with Books and 
Borrowers," "Modern Methods of Illustration: Half-tone 
Process and Newspaper Chalk Process," etc. 

The co-operation of the training class has been an in- 
centive to all members of the regular force, who have 
shown patience and consideration in giving advice and 
assistance to the pupils when they applied for it. 

LIBRARY TRAINING CLASS. 

In November, 1891, six young women were admitted 
forming the first training class. Twenty applicants were 
examined, and from this number six were chosen. At 
the end of four months it was seen that the plan worked 
well, and a second class was admitted. At the end of 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 29 

another three months a third class was organized. When 
the time came for the examination of a fourth class, the 
applicants failed to make the reqidsite quaUfications, and 
the formation of this class was postponed for another 
three months. The applicants for admission to these 
classes are, as a rule, graduates or pupils of the higher, 
schools. A full explanation of the system appeared in 
the August number of the Library Bulletin and need not 
again be set forth here. 

IN CONCLUSION. 

In summing up the past year's work it is certainly 
shown that the people of our city want a library and 
appreciate one ; and while it is probable that such an 
extraordinary increase in general usefulness in one year 
may not occur again, yet if proper quarters and financial 
support are given to this institution, it will continue to 
rank as it now does. It must be evident that no library 
can stand still, for if it does not progress it will at once 
fall behind, and that ought never be allowed to happen 
with the start that this library now has, and especially 
in a community which has clearly shown itself so 
thoroughly in sympathy with the benefits derived from 
the use of a library conscientiously administered. 

As your Board knows it has ever been my aim and 
wish to avoid the " ruts " that this work can so easily 
fall into, and the gratification at the success of the past 
year's work is tempered by the realization of how much 
still remains to be done; indeed, we are but at the begin- 
ning. And it should not be forgotten in considering this 
report, presented in my name, that any acknowledgment 
of the accomplishments it records belongs equally to the 
staff which you have given me. 

TESSA L. KELSO, 

Librarian, 
Dated, December 10th, 1892. 



30 



REPOBT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



LIST OF DONATIONS 



TO THE 



Los Angeles Public Library 

From Dec. Isty 1891, to Dec. 1st, 1892. 



Aberdeen (Scotland) Public Library^. 

Adams, H. B 

Adam, Key. J 

Allen, Mrs. Templer 

American Forestry Congress 

Amherst College 

Anon 

Arevalo, M. S 

Bangor Public Library 

Barrows, H. D. 



Battersea (England) Public Library.... 

Belmont Hall 

Bengough, Miss Elizabeth 

Berry, J. M 

Blum, Bev. A , 

Boston Athenaeum 

Boston Institute of Technology , 

Boston Public Library 

Bowdoin College , 

Bremer, Dr. L 

Bridges, Dr. Norman 

BrooKline (Mass.) Public Library 

Brooklyn Art ^cnool 

Brooklyn Public Library 

Brown, 6elah 

Biyn Mawr College 

Buffalo Historical Society 

Buffalo Public Library 

Buffalo Young Men's Ass'n Library.... 
California Academy of Sciences 

Bank Commissioners 

Dept. of State. 

Historical Society 

Nursery Co 

Bailroad Commissioners 

•State Agricultural Society... 
Board of Horticulture. 

'* " Trade 

Library 

Universitjr 

Cambridge Manual Training School.... 

Campbell, Rev 

Carnegie Public Library 



u 

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BOOK& 



1 
1 



1 

7 



19 



4 

6 

15 

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49 



22 
1 



14 
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P0BT9. 



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17 
8 
4 

26 
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3 
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1 



2 
16 



1 

1 

8 

7 



2 
1 
2 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



31 



Carr, Mrs. J. C 

Oaaklnsy L. L 

Chadwick, J. 8 

Chicago Board of EdacatioD 

Chicago Public Library 

CiDcioDati Museum Association 

Cleveland Medical College 

Cleveland Public Librarj 

Cochran, J. W 

Cole, A. J 

Collins, H. O 

Colorado State Univeniitj 

Columbus College 

Columbus Public Library 

Columbus Public School Library.... 

Cooper Union 

Cornell University 

Council Bluf& Public Library 

Cowan, T. A 

Croydon (England) Public Library. 

Davidson, Dr. A 

Denver Board of Education 

Denver Public Library 

Denver Universitpr 

Detroit Public Library 

Dobinson, 6. A 

Diezel Institute 

Egan, Richard 

Elizabeth Public Library 

EUis, Dr. Bert , 

Ellis Club 

Enderlein, Mrs. Ella 

Enoch Pratt Free Library 

Erspenmuller, F. W 

Fletcher Public Library 

Friesner, W. M..... 

Gardner, G. A 

Hackley Public Library 

Harrington, M. W 

Hartfora Library Association 

Hartwig, Dr. O 

Harvard University.... 

Harvard University Library 

Ideal Guitar Banjo Club....'. 

Indian Kights Association 

Indianapolis Public Library 

Indianapolis Public Schools 

Jefferson Medical College 

Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Johns Hopjdns University 

Johnson, T. L 

Kansas City Board of Education... 

Kansas State Library 

Kephart, Horace 



BOOKS. 



2 
1 
2 
1 



1 
2 
3 



PAMS. 



20 
2 
1 



38 
1 
1 
5 
1 



,R£- 
P0&T8. 



1 

1 

13 



7 
1 
1 
7 
1 



18 
1 
1 



30 



2 
2 
2 
1 
4 
7 
11 



5 
3 
3 



4 

7 



1 
1 



15 
1 
3 



16 



1 
2 
2 
1 
1 



1 
1 



32 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Knight, W. H 

Kubel.F 

Laxard, MiflB L 

Leland Stanford UnivenitT 

Lincoln Pablic Library 

Los Angeles High School 

Maimonides Library 

Manchester, (N. H.) Public Library 

Maryland Institute Mechanic Arts. 

Massachusetts Normal Art School 

Milwaukee Public Library 

Minneapolis Public Library 

Minnesota Historical Society 

Morrell (Hiawatha, Ka.) Library 

Naas (Sweden) Manual Tr&ining School,... 

Nebraska Historical Society 

Nevada Historical Society 

New Bedford Public Library 

New Hayen Public Library 

New York CoUeg^ for Training Teachers... 

New York Free Public Library 

New York State Library School 

New York Y. M. C. A. Library 

Newark Public Library 

Ne wburyport ( N. H. ) Public Library 

Oakland Public Library 

O'Donoughue, Miss Mary 

Ohio Historical and Philosophical Society.. 

Osterhout Public Library 

Patterson Public Library 

Peabody Institute 

Peoria City Clerk.. 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences. 

Industrial Art School 

Mercantile Library 

Public Ledger , 

School of I^gn for Women . 

*' Social Science Association 

Pomade, J 

Poole, W, F 

Pratt Institute 

Proyidence Athenaeum 

Proyidence Public Library 

Hand, McNally» 

Rindge, F. R.. 

Root, Miss J. A 

RuesB, W. E 

Salem, (Mass.) Public Library 

San Francisco Board oi Trade 

Free Public Library... 

Mercantile Library.. 

Santa Rosa Public Library... 

Sayory, Rey. G. W 

Scranton (Pa. ) Public Library 



BOOKS. 



it 
It 

u 
it 



u 
1( 






1 

5 

1 
1 



PAMS. 
. 1 

4 
5 
7 
1 
1 



RE- 
PORTS. 



2 
1 

5 
1 
3 



1 
1 
9 



18 
"2 



1 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 



11 



1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
3 
1 
10 

18 



2 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
9 



1 

4 
1 
1 



LOS ANQBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



33 



u 



Smith, C. C. 

Smith College .1 

Smithsonian Inatitate.^ 

Springifield (Mass.) Pnblic Library 

St. Louis Mercantile Library.. 

St. Loois Public Libraiy.. 

St. Loub School of Fine Arts 

St. Pan! Pablic Library... 

Stephens, O 

Teed, F. G 

Tennessee Historical Society 

Throop University 

Times-Mirror Co... 

Toledo Manual Training Sdiool 

Toledo Public Library 

Topeka State Library... 

Toronto Public Library 

Torres, Hon. L. E 

T^ngsboro (Mass.) Public Libraiy 

U. S. Academy of West Point. 

Board on Geographic Names 

Bureau of American Republics. 

Education 

Labor.. 

Weather 

Coast and Geodetic Surrey 

Congress .- 

Department of Agriculture 

Interior.. 

Stote 

War 

House of Bepresentatives 

Suigeon-Gteeral , 

Coll^pe... 

Wade, W. L 

Walker, Stella 

Wallace, H. 

Warder (Springfield, O.) Library 

Warren County (111.) Public Library 

Washington Uniyersity (St. Louis) 

Watertown (Mass.) Public Library 

Weymouth, A. B— 

Wicks, M. Xf.M 

Waiard, C. D 

Wisconsin Historical Sodety 

Wisconsin State Suj;)erintenaent of Schools ... 

Wisconsin University 

Wolverhainpton (England) Public Library.. 

Worcester Polytechmc Institute 

Worcester Public Library... 

Yale University. 

Yong, Mrs. S. A 



u 



u 
a 
« 
u 



u 
<i 
u 
u 



u 
u 
tt 



BOOKS. 



6 



4 
1 
1 
2 



2 
200 
106 

6 



7 
16 



Total. 



1 
3 



FAMS. 



1 
1 

3 
2 



17 



1 
7 
1 
1 



22 



1 
53 
42 
2 
6 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 



14 



3 
3 

18 



1 
1 



475 651 



BE- 
FOKTP. 



1 

1 

1 

19 



6 



1 
1 
1 



1 

27 



168 
11 



1 
16 



16 



1 
1 



477 









ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Los Angeles Hublic Library 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN. 



1892-93 






, i ^ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Los Angeles Hublic Library 



AND 



REPORT OP LIBRARIAN. 



1892-93. 




/ 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Directors 



OF THE 



Ijos ^nqeles public LfibraFy 



AlVB 



. REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 



December J iSqj. 










^08 f\i)^2\es publie Ijbrary. 



DIRECTORS. 

G. A. DOBINSON, PresidenL 
SHELDON BORDEN, FRANK H. HOWARD, 

W. J. HAMILTON, W. A. SPALDING. 



COMMITTEES. 
Books and Donations. 

F. H. HowABD, W. A. Spalding. 

Rules and Administration. 

Sheldon Bobden, F. H. Howard. 

Auditing and Accounts. 

W. J. Hamilton, W. A. Spalding. 

Printing: and Supplies. 

W. J. Hamilton, F. H. Howard. 

Attendants. 

O. A. DoBiNSON, Sheldon Bobden, W. A. Spalding. 



Tesba L. Kelso, Clerk and Librarian, 
Adelaide R. Hasse, Assistant Librarian. 
Ebtelle Haines, Principal Reference Department, 

Attendants. 

Oelia Gleason, BUbeiiet Mebceb, 

Nellie Russ, Bebtha Piebce, 

Elizabeth Fa boo, Anna Austin, 

Stella Walkeb, Florence Thobnbebo, 

Gobinne Wise, Noba Milleb, 

Mattie Tedpobd, Anna Beckley, 

Leila Kingsley, Helen Nevin, 

Gebtbude Dablow. 






RERORT 



or THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Co8 f\r)(^eles public I^ibrary 



December, 1893 



The Honorable Council 0/ the City of Los Angeles: 

Gentlemen: — We herewith beg to submit the annual report 
of the Los Angeles Public Library for the year ending 30th 
November, 1893, according to the City Charter. 

The statistics and other useful information in regard to 
the work of the library and its present condition, are contained 
in the report of the Librarian, which is hereto annexed, to 
which we hereby refer, the same being made a part of this report. 
As you will be able to note by an examination of the tables 
contained in the Librarian's report, the use of the library by the 
public has steadily grown, year by year, until now, when we find 
13,495 people enrolled as active members of the library, drawing 
for home use, for the past year, 267,054 volumes. While the 
demands upon the library by the public have increased in such 
astonishing ratio, the Board has not been able, on account of the 
limited space allotted for the use of the library, and also on 
account of the limited means at its disposal, to give that amount 
of satisfaction in the service which the public has a right to 
demand through the assistance of your Honorable Body. Our 
crying necessity is for more room and better accommodations. 



4 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

It is a fact demanding recognition that the public requires bet- 
ter service than it is possible to render in the present cramped 
quarters, and with the small amount that remains after payment 
of the necessary running expenses. If the library could be 
afforded sufficient space so that the books could be arranged in a 
way that would give convenient access to the shelves, the result 
would be the greatest accommodation to the public, and also a 
diminution of the expense which is at present unavoidable. If 
an arrangement could be made by which the library could have 
more room in the City Hall, or be removed to a location where 
better accommodations could be secured, it would be of the 
greatest service to the public. Or, if this Board had the means 
at its disposal for the establishment of delivery stations, in at 
least four of the outlying parts of the city, the pressure upon the 
central part of the library would be so much decreased that it 
would be a great deal easier to handle the large crowds that come 
to the library daily. For this relief we speak in the name of 
the 13,495 members of the library and of the many more who 
would like to avail themselves of its privileges. 

We call your particular attention to the statement of receipts 
and expenditures contained in this report, and while we are aware 
that the amounts expended are large, we are satisfied that they 
will not appear unnecessarily so, if they are studied in relation 
to the amount of work done and the good accomplished. It 
has been the careflil study of the Board in the control of all 
expenditures, to see that the Library obtains value received for 
every dollar disbursed, and as this question of expenditures has 
provoked some comment, mostly, we admit, of the unthinking 
sort, we append herewith a tabulated statement showing the home 
circulation of those public libraries in the United States, which 
issue over 200,000 volumes annually, also the number of 
volumes contained in each such library, the popula- 
tion of each city according to the census of 1890, and the total 
salary roll in each instance. We have appended to this list a 
statement of the principal San Francisco libraries, none of 
which properly come in the above mentioned classification, but 
for the reason that comparisons have been made with such 
libraries, and we desire to set forth the figures so as to settle 
the question of relative standing forever. 

The table is as follows : 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



No. 


Pop. 


Salaries 


Vols. 


1890. 




189,350 


1,099,860 


♦73,787 27 


676,287 


448,477 


92,684 79 


122,773 


434,439 


19,744 13 


32,110 


163,003 


11,290 91 


61,992 


164,738 


23,870 00 


115,661 


206,876 


16,138 52 


35,937 


181,830 


14,586 67 


34,332 


60,395 


10,979 51 


72,078 


261,355 


12,636 81 


202,705 


296,908 


32,346 85 


:0 LIBRARIES. 




62,444 


298^997 


10,059 50 


62,825 


298,997 


4,217 50 


74,200 


298,997 


18,623 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES CIRCULATING OVER 200,000 VOLUMES FOR 

HOME USE. 

Ci^. Home 

use. 

Ohkago 988,601 

Boston 726,052 

Baltimore.. 442,654 

Jersey Gitj 345,096 

Minneapolis 333,612 

Detroit - 315,888 

Newark 272,347 

Los Angeles 267,054 

aeydand 259,693 

Cincinnati 254,517 



Mechanics' Institute.... 152,709 

Mercantile 18,392 

PabUc Library 139,630 

It will be observed that whereas, we, with a total of 84,332 
volumes circulate 267,064 volumes per annum, with a salary roll 
of $10,979 per annum, the San Francisco Public Library hav- 
ing at its command 74,200 volumes circulates only 139,630 volumes 
per annum, with a salary roll of 918,623. 

The comparative use made of their public libraries by 
eleven prominent cities of the United States, is shown by the fol- 
lowing table, which gives the average number of books circulated 
to each inhabitant : 

Average No. of Books 
Per Capita. 

(1) Lo0 Angeles 6.30 

(2) Jersey aty 2.11 

(3) Minneapolis 2.02 

(4) Boston 1.61 

(6) Detroit 1.53 

(6) Newark 1.49 

(7) Baltimore: 1.02 

(8) aeveland .99 

(9) Chicago .90 

(10) Cincinnati .85 

(11) San Francisco .47 

The comparative cost of circulating books in the several 
cities named, is shown by the following table, which gives the 
average expense (in salaries) per volume circulated : 



6 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



i! 



i) Jenej City 3.3 

^2) LosAngeleB 4.1 

(3) Baltimope^ 4.4 

(4) Cleveland 4.8 

[b) Detroit 6.1 

6) Newark 6.3 

7) Minneapolia 7.1 

8) Chicago 7.4 

;9) BoetoD 12.7 

(10) Cindnnati 12.8 

(11) San Frandsoo 13.3 

Thus it appears that, while Los Angeles shows the largest per 
capita circulation of any of the cities named, the expense of cir- 
culating was lower with us than in any other city, with but one 
exception — Jersey City. In three of the cities named, the ex- 
pense per volume was over three times that incurred in Los 
Angeles. While the general average of cost in the eleven cities 
was 7.3 cents per volume, Los Angeles has an expense of only 4.1 
cents. A comparison of general averages such as here given is ir- 
refutable testimony as to the efficiency of the Los Angeles Public 
Library, and the economy of its management. 

This Board was invited to send to the World's Fair at 
Chicago an exhibit showing its system of management, its forms 
and records in use, its labor-saving devices and specimens of the 
same, where practicable, and photographic views of the library in- 
terior and exterior ; said exhibit was prepared and sent forward 
for exhibition at a small cost, and we have not heard that this 
expense has been objected to. The Board was further invited to 
send a delegate to the World's Congress of Librarians and to 
the meeting of the American Library Association, special 
consideration being shown to Los Angeles in this invitation. 
The Board took the matter of the invitation under advisement, and 
after a careful examination of the charter, arrived unanimously 
at the conclusion that it was legally authorized to do the thing 
which common sense and the most ordinary regard for the in- 
terests of our library and city would dictate as the proper pro- 
ceeding, namely, to send a representative to this important 
congress and meeting. 

Among the duties imposed upon this Board by the charter, 
'in addition to the general provisions for the proper equipment 
and running of the library as a public institution, is that of 
maintaining it according to the spirit and intent of its provisions. 
Viewed as a public institution, the proper maintenance of the 
Library must be in accordance with the dignity of the city, aad 



i 

LOB AKGELS8 PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



in aid of its claims as the metropolis of Southern California, ike 
oenter of the most attvactii^ place for the health seeker, tourist, 
capitalist, mannfaotnrer and agrieoltiirist. Our claims to be eeii* 
sidered the Italy of America would be very poorly supported if 
our public library, our schools and churches were allowed to Call 
into a neglected condition; but, apart from these general eon* 
sideratimie and superior to them, as having a more direct bearing 
upon the libraiy as an institution, the Board recognised that 
this Congress was called to consider and discuss the latest and 
most adTunoed methods and systems of government, management, 
conduct and maintenance of public libraries ; to obtain by com- 
parison and comment the best information upon the subject of 
public libraries and the most modem systems of management 
and control thereof^ and that the attendance of a delegate firem 
this library at such congress ceuld not but result in a great 
benefit to the library, and conduce to its improvement and 
probably to some farther economy in its methods. Having these 
sentiments, the Board concluded that it would be properly 
chaigeable with neglect of its duty and willful blindness to the in- 
terests of our library and city if it failed to accept the invitation 
tendered, and to commission a representative to the Congress at 
the World's Fair. The Board is perfectly willing, aside from all 
technicalities, to submit this question to the judgment of the en- 
lightened citizens of Los Angeles, feeling sure that the compara- 
tively trifling outlay incurred has been more than repaid in the 
advantages accrued« Out of a total of over 800 delegates as- 
sembled at Chicago, no less than nine were from the Pacific Coast, 
and many of these were sent at an expense many times multi- 
plied over the small outlay incurred by this Board. 

We would not have said so much upon this point were it not 
that an attempt has been made by ignorant and prejudiced 
people to criticise in an entirely unwarrantable manner the 
action and methods of this Board, and to prevent the payment of 
the sum appropriated. 

The civil service rules originally adopted by this Board 
have been found to work admirably. Appointments and pro- 
motions on the staff of employees are governed entirely by fitness 
and without reference to political or other influence. Regular 
examinations have l)een held and by the system of trainiag, dur- 
ing which the pupils give their time without pay, the library 



8 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRBGTORB 

has been able to secure a considerable amount of valuable help, 
besides educating the students for the intelligent discharge of 
their duties, and thus raising the standard of proficiency. 
So far from the class being a burden upon the resources of the 
library, it has been of material assistance and has mo73 than 
repaid the nominal outlay incurred in its maintenance. We call 
attention in this connection to that part of the Librarian's 
report in which the number of hours of gratuitous service per- 
formed by the pupils is set forth. 

The Board receives reports from the Librarian from time to 
time showing the regularity with which the staff of employees is 
discharging its duties and the interest which they severally take 
in the endeavors made to render the institution of the greatest 
service to the public. The Library Club maintained by the staff 
and by the teachers and others interested in library work, 
is an admirable organization, and its membership and attendance 
shows the extent to which the employees are devoted to the spirit 
of their avocation. 

The work done by the staff during the past year is com- 
mended by the Board, and the faithful services of the Librarian 
and Assistant merit the warmest recognition. Miss Kelso 
has heretofore demonstrated her fitness for the responsible posi- 
tion she holds and the Board continues to repose confidence in 
her ability and integrity. 

In the conduct of so large a business, each day involving 
thousands of transactions, it would be remarkable if some few 
complaints, just or unjust, should not be made. It is only due 
to the Librarian and staff to say that in no case that has come 
to our knowledge has there been any well-grounded cause for dis- 
satisfaction on the part of the public, but on the contrary, very 
many warm expressions of approval of the service given, gener- 
ally coupled, however, with a wish for the development of the 

library's resources. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. A. DoBiNSON, President. 
Sheldon Borden, 
William A. Spalding, 

Attest : F. H. Howard, 

T. L. Kelso, Clerk, Wm. J. Hamilton, 

Los Anobles, Cal., Dec. 11th, 1893. Directors. 



LOS ANGICLE8 PUB][iIC LIBRARY. 9 



REPORT 



OF 



THE LIBRiARIAN 



To the Board of Directors of the Lob Angeles Pvhlic Library : 

Gbntlemen : — ^I beg leave to submit to you herewith my fifth 
annual report, covering the work of the library year, viz : 1st 
December, 1892, to Ist December, 1893. 

The amount apportioned by the City Council to the Library 
Fund for the current fiscal year, 1st August, 1893, to 1st August, 
1894, equals four and four-tenths cents on each one hundred dol- 
lars of the assessed value of all taxable property, or $19,073.81. 
The maximum limit fixed by the charter allows an apportion- 
ment for library purposes of five cents on each one hundred dol- 
lars of taxable property, which apportionment if made, would 
this year have netted to the Library, $28,305. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Library Fund for the 
past year are as follows : 






/ 

10 RBPOBT OF BOABD OF DIBBCT0B8 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand lit December, 1892. $ 56 68 

Received balance of apportionment, fiscal year, 

1892-93 $11,888 20 

Reoeiyed on accoont of apportionment, 1893-94 8,690 72 

119,923 92 

Books lo0t and paid for ^ 46 60 

Fines 803 08 

Dues 31 60 

884 53 

Finding lists sold 23 60 

Duplicate books sold 9 00 

Demand No. 640 cancelled and re-depodted 40 00 

Shelf sheets sold to RiTerside P. L 2 26 

74 85 

Balance 244 69 

$21,180 27 



I 



There is due the Library Fund a balance of $10,482.69 on 
account of the appropriation of 1893-94. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Books $ 3,473 11 

Pbbiodicam 2^667 93 

BniDiKO 1,747 10 

* $ 7,888 14 

LiBBARY EZPEHSBB — 

Stationery and supplies, (includes magaiine coven, 

rubber stamps book plates, etc.) 402 09 

Printing blank fi>rni8, etc 373 60 

Sundry expenses— 

Postage $160 00 

Other incidental expenses 281 73 

4S1 78 

Printing Annual Report, 1000 copies. 112 50 

BuUetins, three months 165 00 

Carpentering 190 00 

Matting 14 50 

Plumbmg. 13 43 

World'sFair exhibit 40 50 

Desk for relereneeroom 18 00 

Numbering machine 15 00 

Gas fixtures 33 90 

Ohaiw 10 eo 

Insurance 135 00 

Appropriation for expenses of delegate to Amer. lib. 

Aas'n. and World's Congren of librarianB. ^ 900 00 

Printing Rules and Regulations, 5000 copies 36 00 

Catalog cases and cards 104 87 

Janitor 780 00 

Sunday and holiday expense 288 00 

8,880 62 

Salabisb 9,911 51 

$21,180 27 



LOB ANGBLBa PUBLIC UBSABY. 11 

BOOKS. 

Number of Tolumes in library Isl December, 1892 ~ 29,889 

Number of TolumeB added to Itt December, 1898 t,QSS 

Total 86,472 

Worn oat and diacaided 1,078 

Lost and paid for ^^ ^ 

Lost and mipaid for « 20 

Total « 1,140 

Total number of books in libraiy lit December, 1898 84,882 



GliASSIFIED CONTENTS OF CIRCULATING 

DEPARTMENT. 



z=9 



CLAaS. 



Philoeophy 

Beligion. 

Sociology^ 

Philology.. 

Natofalooieiioe. 

Usefiil ArU 

Fine Arts. 

literamre.. 

HistoiT 

Trayeu. 




494 
1^27 
1,189 

150 
1,129 

634 

686 
2,069 
1,467 
1,854 



CLAbBi 



Bioi 




on 



Joyenile Fiction..*.. 

Music 

Frenok ^... 

German.. 

Spanish 

Italian 

Bound Periodicals 

Unbound Periodicals. 



YOIA. 



1,744 
8,976 
2,052 
970 
657 
240 
208 
228 
597 
417 



ciaAssified contents of reference 

department. 



CLASS. 



Btblioeraphy .... 
Bbc^ctopaeoias.* 

Philosophj 

Beligion 



I^ilologr.. , 

Natoral tidenee. 

UseAilArts 

Fine Arts 




291 
272 

7 
77 

190 
81 

187 
79 

121 



CLASB. 



Literature.. 

History 

Travels 

Biography 

Spanisb.. 

Bound Periodicals... 

Fiction. 

Oeraaaa....... 

Italian 



vou. 



131 

147 

269 

79 

24 

2,946 

8 

2 

1 



During the pott year ihe additions to the library have been 



12 BSPOBT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

in the main duplicates of such books as were shown by the 
records of the circulating department to be most in demand. In 
fiction it is thought better to have six copies of one good novel 
than to have six novels of an indifferent character. In biogra- 
phy and travels the additions have been almost entirely 
duplicates of books suitable for use in the schools, these two 
classes of books being most used for supplementary reading in 
school work. 

The religion and literature classes have had some impor- 
tant additions, both classes having been in actual need of fresh 
material. The additions to the history, science, philosophy and 
sociology classes have been very meagre, being confined prin- 
cipally to the few new books appearing during the year on these 
subjects. In the science and sociology classes, this failure to 
provide new books is counteracted by the large number of 
economic and scientific periodicals on file in the reading and 
reference rooms. 

Considering the number of volumes added to the different 
classes, fiction naturally ranks first, because the books are hand- 
led more, consequently wear out sooner and need to be replaced 
oftener ; and because more books of imaginative literature are 
being published and read than books of any other class. How- 
ever, the cost of the average novel to the library may be esti- 
mated at eighty-eight cents, while the cost of the average book 
other than a novel may be estimated at one dollar and a quarter. 

Curing the past two years the main resources of the library 
cannot be said to have received material additions ; such as have 
been made during that time have in almost every case, been the 
result of unusual conditions, that might have been brought about 
by a change of study in the higher schools, the organization 
of special study classes, by a spasmodic demand created by the 
return of an explorer, or by a religious or political controversy. 

The time is rapidly coming when a systematic series of 
accessions will have to be made in order that the library may not 
lose its equilibrium as an organic whole. The tendency, as at 
present, of allowing the greater part of the library's resources to 
be absorbed by temporary demands must be an evil one if car- 
ried too far. 

Acknowledgment is here due for the many valuable docu- 



LOS ANOELBB PUBLIC LIBRABY. 13 

mentB forniBhed by the Government to this Library. Our chief 
industrial interests being agricultural, we are placed in a pecu- 
liarly grateful position to the Agricultural, State (consular re- 
ports), and Treasury (statistics of production, imports and ex- 
ports) Departments, the various issues of which are extensively 
used. 

The library is in communication with the governments of 
India and Australia in regard to such material as may be 
obtained for the library pertaining to their irrigation and hor- 
ticultural systems respectively, both of which are so closely allied 
to those now being adopted in our state. 



BOOK BOBROWBRS. 

At the time of the last annual report the active membership 
of the library numbered 9,956. The additions for the year are 
4,220, of whom 1,778 are men, and 2,442 are women, the average 
registration per month being 800. The active membership to 
date is 13,495. In October the time limitation of the securitieei 
was extended from two to three years from the date of signature 
of the same. 

The total number of cards issued since 1st September, 1889, 
the day of the opening of the library, is 15,939 ; but 13,495 
represents the active membership on 30th November, 1893. 

The plan of re-r^istration not being used in this library, 
the card index to the membership is revised daily ; new names, 
withdrawals, changes of address of borrower or of guarantor are 
entered up daily. 

Notices of the expiration of securities are mailed monthly, 
and if not renewed on or before the date of expiration designated 
on the notice, the borrower's card is thereupon canceled, and an 
entry to that effect is made in the members' card index. Cards 
to the same effect are posted in conspicuous places in the corri- 
dors, and thes^e means have proven thoroughly satisfactory in 
keeping the members' index up to date, the actual cost in time 
and material of mailing the delinquent notices being less than 
would be consumed in re-registration, not considering the 
objection to this process by the public. 



REPOBT OF BOARD OF DIRECTOSa 



CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 

M Deeimitr, I89t, lo 11 Ikemlur, 18$3. 



The figures above quoted are bo much in excecB of those of 
the usual library of 30,000 volumes that some explanatory state* 
ments seem necessary. 

In the home nee of books the count is based upon slips made 
for every book and periodical issued, and these slips are counted 
one by one. The reading room count is also made from slips for 
books and periodicals issued for reading room use, but does not 
represent the entire reading room use, since in most cases after 
one slip is filled, books and mi^azines are exchanged without 
further identification. The reference room count represents the 
number of readers who come into the room for study, and does 
not comprise visitors. 

For the past six months, viz., June to November, a count has 
been kept of the readers who visit the general reading room to use 
the newspapers and periodicals on the racks and for the use of 
which no slips are required to be filled out. These visitors 
numbered 24,831 for the six months. Of the large attendance of 
newspaper readers in the ladies' reading room, no account has 
been attempted. Consequently the figures as given in the table 
showing the circulation of books do not represent the sum total of 
the library's activity ; for this it is impossible to estimate an 



• 1 



LOS AKGELSS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 16 

equivalent in figures, but they do show the number of books and 
periodicals that have actually been removed from shelf to 
borrower and replaced on the shelf. 

The comparatively extraordinary use made of so small a 
number of books as shown in the preceding tables, is accounted 
for by the character of the population of Lios Angeles, and largely 
by the fact that there is no competing library in the city. 

The number of persons enrolled upon the registers of the 
library as actually drawing books exceeds that of the voting 
population of the city, but unlike that in the fact that it is not 
distributed over the entire area of Los Angeles, but concentrated 
particularly within walking distance of, or near the car lines 
passing by the library. The library does not reach the more 
isolated portions of the city, nor can it except by the establish- 
ment of delivery stations. The maintenance of four stations 
situated respectively near University, on Boyle Heights, in East 
Los Angeles, and on Angeleno Heights would enable the Library 
to give a daily service to the people of these vicinities. The sum 
necessary to do this it is impossible to subtract from the income 
of the central library, without crippling the service here, and 
so defeating its primary object. The financial support of the 
library is ample for a library such as this was two and three years 
ago, but since its patronage has doubled, its stock of books has 
increased, and the demands made upon it have grown in variety 
and number, and it is but reasonable to argue that it is impossible 
to maintain the same standard, much less elevate it, upon the 
same income that the library had when it was doing one-half the 
amount of work it is doing at the present time. Do the people 
want the library to fall into the stereotyped principles of the old 
time public library, or do they want a service active, live and 
up to the times ? 

The following table gives the home use of books for the past 
four years, the period since the re-organization of the library. 

HOMi: CIBCUIiATIOK OF BOOKS. 

1889-90 47,172 

1890-91 116,263 

1891-92 233,363 

1892-93 267,054 



BEPORT OF BOABD OF DIBKCTOTS 











T^ 


Mo. Tima Moh 


Sook 










1- 




uiClieaUtal 




"T 


1 


^ 










!_ 


1 


i 


1 










434 


41 




1 










1,327 






2 










1,189 






1.3 










160 








.1 










1,129 


4 


3 


7 


2 










684 


H 


3 


8 


1.8 










636 


n 


12 


1.4 










2,068 


4 


2 


6 


3.1 










1,469 


3 


2 


^ 


2.1 










1864 


6 


8 


n 


S.3 










1,744 


3 


2 


H 


2.4 


tlction 


i4a,(wu 


la.uHU 


lOU.IHV 


8,976 


16 


1 


I7J 


41 


" JuTenile 


82,861 

28,489 
7,720 


ii,ec9 

64,833 
4,616 


44,G10 
78,122 
12,235 


Is 

697 


16 
149 
18 


6 


iS 

20 


12 
20 
3.1 


Currant M-B^azmcs... 
Boaod MtuuineB.... 


7 


Music....Z.- 


2.893 


1,299 


4,192 


970 


8 


}^ 


H 


1 




1794 


lose 


3,892 
2,848 


667 


41 


6J 


1 


Oemum - 


1.367 


Zi 


240 


' 


8^ 


1 


lUlUn 


172 


189 


361 


223 


1 


i 


ij 


.1 


SpanUh „ 


1,84^ 


687 


2,044 


208 


6 


3* 


I 


I. 



*1ST Volumw for Borne CIronUUon ; 360 Volume* tor Libnrr ClrcaUtloa. 

The class showing the largest increase ia adult fiction ; and, 
while some part of such increase is due to the use of that class by 
our tourist population, the fact remains that the disadvantageous 
conditions prevailing in the delivery room of the library doubt- 
less have a growing tendency toward a lower standard of reading. 
It is impossible to remedy theee oonditioiis with the amount of 
money now allowed the library. A young man who has been 
reading nothing but fiction asks for a biography or a book of 
travel ; the attendant has a hand full of slips from people who are 
waiting to receive books, and can stop only long enough to say, 
"What country?" "Oh, anything interesting." There is only 
time to hastily gather up one or two books that seem suitable, but 
which may not suit the borrower who, during this time, has been 
conscious of the pushing, striving crowd endeavoring to get a 
place at the counter. So he says, " Never mind, just give me a 
Qovel;" and the opportunity to start a new line of thought and 
study is probably lost. This is no in&ecinent instance, and the 
increased use of fiction increases the cost of handling the books, 
so many being " out," and the wear and tear in turn increases the 
binding account until all chance of buying new books is gone. 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



17 



The other classes of books have circulated about in the same 
ratio as during last year, the only exception being fine arts, 
w^hich class includes such subdivisions as landscape gardening, 
^oriculture, architecture, sculpture, drawing, decoration, paint- 
ing, engraving, photography and history of music. The home 
use of this class of books for the past three years is 1448 volumes 
in 1891 ; 3,393 volumes m 1892 ; 4719 volumes in 1893. Useful 
Arts also shows a distinct gain over last year, due to the extensive 
use of books on agriculture, horticulture and books on hygiene^ 
tndeed this table setting forth the character of reading, shows it 
to be in keeping with the extraordinary use of books. 

The fiction in the library is on the whole above the ordinary 
standard, most of the weak as well as the vicious authors being 
excluded. 

The large magazine circulation in current and bound form 
comprises a class of reading that has a distinct upward tendency. 
It has been said of our circulation that it might be accounted for 
by the fact that it included magazines, a fact supposably to be de- 
precated. As a matter of fact the average magazine is far and away 
better, and a more effective means of culture than the average 
book: besides the mechanical work of handling the magazine 
costs the library more time and difficulty than it does to issue a 
book. 

DISTRIBUTION OF BOOKS THROUGH T6e 

SCHOOLS. 



December..... 
Januarj. ... 
Febmaxy..... 

March 

April 

May 

toe.. 

Sepimbet., 

October 

]^0Tember ... 



MomrBs. 



JLOaoU «.....-. ....*•'«•........»......«..•••«..-. 



Na of 
DellTerles. 



4 
4 
4 
3 
8 

i 

1 
1 

4 

33 



•No. ol 
Sohools. 



24 
28 
27 
17 
17 
80 
5 
6 
37 
23 

214 



No. of Volumes 
Delivered. 



1,034 
1,180 
1,132 
1,008 
774 

U2 

386 

2»27a 

2,069 

11,660 



* The High School IjS not included ; it hai a library and the teachers do not draw 
booka regularly. 

a 



18 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The books, not to exceed twenty in number, are issued to the 
teachers for thirty days, and may be renewed once for the same 
length of time. The teachers of this city have shown the liveliest 
interest in the work of making the relationship of the library 
and school a closer one. The plan of admitting teachers to the 
shelves after school hours and on Saturday morning, at which 
time the attendants in charge of the school work are detailed to 
assist the teachers, has been a very satisfactory one. Many of 
the teachers belong to the Library Club,^ and the Librarian at- 
tends the teachers' institutes ; such acquaintance, it is believed, 
leads to a better understanding of the work of the teacher by the 
Librarian, and vice versa, for the good of both. 

In June last, just before the close of the school year, the fol- 
lowing blank form was mailed to the teachers : 

1. What use is made of the books taken from the library for use in school? 

2. Are they for jour own use in prei>aring lessons? 

3. Do you read them to your pupils? 

4. Do you circulate them to your pupils for use at home or at school? 

5. Do you allow pupils to take them as a reward for good work? 

6. If loaned to pupils, do you keep a record? 

7. Do you make use of the blank cards provided by the Board of Education 
for this purpose? 

8. Do you haye trouble in keeping track of the books so loaned? 

9. Gould you make good use of more than fifteen books in your school? 

10. Do you send pupils to the library to study special subjects? 

11. Do you in any other way, recommend the use of the library to your 
pupils? If so, how? 

12. Do you issue books to children who take books from the library? 

13. Do you recommend any course of reading to your pupils? 

14. What advantage has the library been to you personally or to the school? 

15. Since using the library in connection with your school work, have you 
found it a help or a burden? 

15. Do you wish the privilege continued? 

16. Have you ever handed in a list of books you would like purchased for 
use in the schools? 

18. What suggestions have you to offer for increased efficiency? 

The expressions in regard to the usefulness of the library in 
connection with school work were unanimous, and were without 
exception in favor of having the privilege continued. In the re- 
plies to query 18, there was no variation, each teacher making 
a strong plea for " more books," particularly the primary grade 
teachers, who urged an additional supply of books " to put into 
the hands of children from six to eight years." 



LOS ANGELB8 PUBLIC LIBRARY. 19 

The number of books available for school room use is wholly 
inadequate, and this want of books will seriously cripple the 
school work during the year. To give to every teacher desiring it, 
the privilege to select those books needed for her grade, and not 
compel her to rely on what may happen to remain on the 
shelves, at least five times the number of books now at the dis- 
posal of the schools would be needed. 



Number of school houses. 36 

Number of school rooms 243 

Nmnber of pupils 9,914 

Number of teachers employed in city schools 243 

Number of teachers drawing books, Ist Deo. 1892. 123 

Nmnber of teachers drawiag books, Ist Dec. 1893 137 



In localities too far from the library to conveniently admit 
of its use by the residents, the teachers of the schools of these lo- 
calities have undertaken the loan of books to parents, and have 
assumed all responsibility against possible loss. 

There are fifteen school houses with 2,309 children, two 
miles or more from the library. Inquiries have been made 
among the teachers of schools close to the library, and of those 
teaching in the more distant schools, regarding the character of 
the reading of children outside of school. The returns have 
clearly proven that where the means of getting books from the 
library are facilitated, the reading is of a higher nature than where 
the child is compelled to rely on his own resources in procuring 
bis reading matter. 



PERIODICALS. 

There are 417 periodicals regularly received by the library 
including the dailies, weeklies, monthlies and quarterlies. 

On file m the reading rooms 80 

On file at the periodical desk 180 

For cue at home (duplicates) 157 

Total 417 



26 



BEPOBT 0^ BOARD OF OIBECTOBS 



r 

The periodical and general information desk, located in the 
delivery room last year, was crowded out in a very short time 
and the desk removed to the general reading room — a better ar- 
rangement than before. 



PERIODICALS FOB HOME USE, BOUND AND UNBOUND. 



PERIODIGAI£. 



Arena. 

Atlftntic.... , 

Oalifoniian 

Centary 

Child Garden 

Cosmopolitan.... 

Critic 

Current LiteratcOre... 

Edectic 

Forum 

Harper's MAgadne^ 

Harper's Young People 

Ulust'rated American 

Kindbrgarten 



GF 


Sp 


4 


8g 
6S 


» B 


fc 


12 


e 


5 


3 


2 


2 


21 


7 


2 


2 


9 


7 


1 


1 


2 


2 


5 


2 


5 


3 


21 


8 


la 


12 


2 


2 


1 


1 



PERIODICALS. 



Lippinoott..... 

Nation 

New ^gland Magazine 

Nineteenth Centunr 

North American Review....... 

Outing 

Overland 

Popular Science Monthly 

KeiviAW of Reviews 

St Nicholas... 

Scrihnei's '. 

Youth's Companion..... 

Little Men and Women.. 






o 



4 
1 
1 
1 

2 
5 
2 
9 
17 
5 
2 



0^ 

8 

■ 

S 



3 
2 
2 
2 
11 
7 
6 
2 



All of the 417 periodicals taken by the library are issued for 
home use, except where one copy only of a periodical is received, 
in which case the current number of su6h periodical is reserved 
for reading -room use. The illustrated art periodicals are also 
withheld frord circulation. 

For the past six months, Ist June, 1893, to 1st December, 
1898, a record has been made of the number of times each 
magazine has been issued for use in the reading rooms. The 
following table gives those that were used over one hundred times 
in the ^x months. 



LOB ANOKLBB PDBLIC UBBABY. 



21 



L. A. Smida^ WorlcL..... , 

Dnniatic Huror 

i^atlon. 

Uber Land und Meer... 

Amj ajid Nay Jpui;wJU 

MiniTig and Saentinc Pnss. 

ftgard lUuBtre.^ 

Electrical ;^Qrld 

JPonch 

aonth's Cpnuwuiion.. 

Areonaat 

I^rt Bwar^ 

Harper's Young People.^ 

PaU MaU Budget. 

Scientific American Supplement 

Hwyr's Weekly 

Frank Leslie's Weekly 

lUUstrated American , 

Life — 

London Graphic 

illustrated London News......... 

Scientific American. 



ISBUXD 



103 
140 
162 
169 
210 
222 
233 
2^3 
254 
276 
3Q6 
313 
379 
400 
415 
647 
684 
687 
852 
958 
1044 
1096 



xqb;chux8. 



e.. 



f'ortnightly Beview. 

Art Amateur 

Catholic World.. 

New En^and 
Cimrent liteyAtui^. 

Atlantic 

Short Stories. 

Nineteenth Century 

Review of Beviews (London).. 

Popular Science Monthly 

Oye^land..... 

Lippincott 

Keview of Beriews (N. Y.) 

St. Nicholaa- 

Outing.. .i 

Califomlan 

Forum 

Demorest 

Season.. 

t)elineator.. 

Queen 

North American Beview 

Ladies' Home JburnaL 

Cosmopolitan 

Scribner's (2 copu 
Century (2 copies] 
Harper's (2 copiesj 



^pies). 

tiesl... 
aes).., 



tBBUBD 



104 

123 

132 
188 
148 
150 
163 
168 
176 
200 
216 
262 
286 
308 
317 
318 
321 
377 
383 
406 
446 
466 
469 
621 
799 
1081 
1152 



B£ia>ING AND BE^A^B. 



The bixiding i^oQant this y^ar ugain showa axi increase over 
ihat of jlASt year, the numl^er of voluxnes sent to the bijadery 
numberuig 8,272, at a cost of $1,747.10. In addition to this 
number, io ^oyember 1st there were 13,675 volumes repaijred in 
the library by the regular staff ; while 1,078 y(dun)^s had to be 
discarded as past all help. Thi^ expense is the most undesirable 
one that the library has to incur, but there seems no hope of de- 
creasing it until money is allowed for the purchase of new books, 
and some remedy is provided to lessen the pressure on a part ol 
the circulating stocdc'of books. But we have our binding done as 
cheaply as any other library, nevertheless the sum total is so 
great that with our present allowance the purchase of new books 
must be sacrificed. 



22 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

BHADIKG BOOMS. 

The general reading room of the library has a seating capacity 
for eighty-five persons, and, like the other departments of the 
library, is generally overcrowded. The periodical and registry 
desks are now in this room, and the noise and confusion of people 
passing to and fro must be, to say the least, annoying. 

The women's reading room can accommodate thirty-five 
persons and, during the day, its capacity is fully taxed, the 
evening attendance being much less than in the reference and 
general reading rooms. A duplicate file of the Los Angeles and 
San Francisco papers has been added to the list of papers on file 
in this room. 

WORK BOOM. 

In the same ratio that the use of the library grows, the me- 
chanical routine of the library increases. When it was 
thought one year ago that the sum of discomfort had been 
reached in being obliged to use the small, badly lighted and 
poorly ventilated room for cataloging and various other occupations 
equally taxing on the eyes, the plan of usurping the public news- 
paper room for this purpose was suggested. This, however, was 
found impracticable, and this year finds us still preparing the 
books for circulation, mending them, cataloging them, receiving 
the mail and the bindery books in the 13x34 feet of partitioned 
corridor called the work room in spite of its lack of necessary 
space, of air and of light. 

Much of the work has been crowded into the attic, which in 
its present unfinished condition is not fit for the use we are com- 
pelled to make of it. An idea of the character and amount of 
work accomplished in the work room may be obtained from 
the tables at the close of this report, headed cataloging depart- 
ment and cllissified list of records. 

befebenoe: boom. 

The number of persons who visited this room for the purpose 
of study numbered 38,142. The additions to the collection of 
books of reference have been very few, the . total number of 
volumes being 1^8,748. In May of this year the registry desk was 
removed from this room into the general reading room, and is a 
great improvement, being more convenient to the delivery room 
and reducing the noise and confusion in the reference room. 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



23 



The seating capacity of the room has been increased, the 
room now accommodating forty-five readers, but during the 
hours from 2 to 4 o'clock in the afternoon, many readers have 
to be sent into the general reading room from lack of space. The 
addition of 200 volumes to this room would necessitate a new 
stack, and a consequent loss of seating capacity. It is to be 
hoped that some arrangement may be made by which the rooms 
adjoining the reference department and now occupied by the 
Superintendent of Schools, may be secured as an extension to the 
reference department. 

The principal of this department has prepared and keeps for 
reference a series of card indexes to such subjects as are 
called for repeatedly. The index to material pertaining to 
California, and more fully described under the cataloging de- 
partment, was prepared by and under the supervision of the 
principal of the reference department. 



SUNDAY AKI> HOJLEDAY OPENING. 

On 1st January, 1893, the new rule governing Sunday 
and holiday opening went into force. It provides that on New 
Year's Day, Washington's Birthday, Decoration Day, Fourth of 
July, Admission Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and on 
all Sundays the library shall be open between the hours of 1 p. m. 
and 9 p. h., that on these days no books shall be exchanged, and 
that service on these days shall be paid for at the rate of twenty 
cents per hour. The cost per Sunday or holiday is $4.80. 

SUNDAY AM) HOLIDAY ATTENDANCB. 



MONTH. 



December... 

January 

Febmarj.... 
March ........ 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.., 
October....... 

KoTember... 

Total 



DAYS. 


XEN. 


WOMXK. 


CHIL- 
DREN. 


4 


508 


108 


106 


6 


865 


206 


177 


6 


966 


274 


216 


4 


959 


206 


118 


5 


685 


186 


128 


6 


625 


140 


84 


4 


489 


109 


82 


6 


548 


116 


84 


4 


433 


88 


69 


6 


564 


171 


141 


5 


648 


146 


111 


5 


676 


198 


121 


58 


7,281 


1,762 


1,309 



TOTAL. 



722 

1,248 
1,456 
1,283 
999 
849 
680 
748 
590 
876 
905 
955 

11,361 



2^ REPORT OP BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

The attendance on Christmas Day was 227 ; Ne^if Year's Day, 
229; Washington's Birthday, 859 ; Decoration Day, 216; Fourth 
of July, 107 ; Admission Day, 218 ; Thanksgiving Day, 256. 



€ATAXiOGI»rO DfiPABTMKBTT. 

The beginninj^ of 1893, found the dictionary card catalog, 
W9xk upon which was begun in March jl892, completed and up to 
date in the classes history, travels and music. For the books of 
these classes, comprising over 3,300 volumes, there had been 
typewritten 10,000 cards, as well as some 12,000 cards fp^ the 
6QQ0 odd volijimes of fiction. Nine numbers of the libraj^ 
bulletin had also been issued, containing some 4,500 printed 
entries of new acqessions since the issue of the general finding 
li^t in 1891. 

In February 1893, the cataloging of the 1,800 volumes of 
the class biography was begun by the cataloger and her two 
assistants, fin^ at the end of three months ^as 4;iished, an 
aggf eg&te of between 4,000 and 5,000 cards having been made. 
The class literature of over 2,000 volumes was next cataloged, 
more than 4,600 cards being written. These books were 
catSjloged by the cataloger and one assistant, with additioneJ 
assistance during one month from four pupils of the training 
class. The end of 1893 thus finds the library with a complete 
catalog up to date of its 7,000 volumes comprising the classes 
history, travels, biography and literature, for all of which at 
least 16,000 cards have been written. 

In addition to this work upon the main catalog of the 
library, the card catalogs of music and fiction have been currently 
carried along, additional entries being inserted as rapidly as new 
books have been added to the library. A special card catalog 
has also been made during the year for the books in drama. 
For .this catalog, title cards only, numbering about 2,000, have 
been written. Also, over 5,000 cards have been written for 
special lights in the reference department. Among these lists, that 
OQ California is worthy of especial notice, including as it does, aU 
the library*s resources on the natural and dvil history, and gfiog- 
raphy of the state. 

The bulletins containing over 1,000 entries were prijaU)4i 
briujging the index of additions down to '' V " in the alphabet. 



LOS ANO£LB8 PUBLIC LIBRARY. 25 

Since February of this year no bulletins have been printed, but 
the short author and title entries for every new book, excepting 
fiction where author entry only is made, have been continued 
aijid constitute in their turn an appendix to the printed bulletins. 
Already the perplexities of supplementary catalogs confront us. 
In September, work was begun on the printer's copy of a new 
fiction list. The need of such a list has been and is' imperative. 

• • • • • 

Inquiries for it are made daily at the delivery desk, the cry of the 
public being for a catalog which can be owned and taken home. 
The two* years' old fiction finding list is practically useless now^ 
and although the card catalog of fiction is kept up to date, yet it 
is stationary and cannot at its best supply the place of a printed 
list in book form. The scope of the new list now in the printer's 
hands, includes besides author entries, subject divisions under 
national life, i. e. English, French, American, etc., each country in 
turn with chronological subdivisions, and under mode of life, i. e. 
sea, theatrical, musical, etc., and many other headings character- 
istic of the various novels and tales comprising the list. The 
catalog is also larjgely descriptive and is designed to be educa- 
tionally helpful and suggestive, rather than a mere, dry author- 
and-title index to the book^ on the shelves. The lists will retail 
at ten centp per copy, a reasonably large sale being anticipated. 

The work of writing the entries for this list has been done by 
tl\e four pupils who are doing the work in cataloging affi^jded by 
t^e second coun^e of the library training class. During the ten 
weaks spent by the class on this catalog, at least 10,000 entries 
were typewritten for the 8,000 volumes of fictign in the library. 
The practical experience thus obtained by the pupils, has been 
a most excellent foundation upon which to continue the study 
of catalpging, not only in its intellectual phases, but also i^ its 
more technical applications. 

Finally, in addition to the regular catalog work accomplisihed 
during the yeat, the making of special lists, and th^ current writ- 
ing of entries for new books, the work of cataloging the books 
in'the reference department has been begun. The making of a 
j^rinted mu^ic list is contemplated for the near future. The bias 
of the work in tl^e cataloginj; department of the library, now is 
jbowards the makii;^ and printing of special lists as occasion or 
opportunity may suggest and permit. The carrying out of this 
idea is being facilitated towards a systematic developn^ent by the 



/ 



26 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

recent practical launching of the long hoped for co-operative cata- 
loging plan, the eyentnal success of which will remove from 
the library the burden of making its main catalog, and will allow 
it a freedom in the making of special lists hitherto attained only 
at the expense and by the neglect of its main catalog. The new 
fiction list will be the first of a series of such special lists. 

The idea of the co-operative plan is a central cataloging 
office doing the work once and permanently for all the libraries 
in the country ; an idea embodying the essentials of economy 
in time, work and money, and at the same time embracing 
an almost unlimited field, wherein to distribute its work. 
The headquarters of the company are in Chicago, with a skilled 
and experienced cataloger in charge. The design is to make 
printed entries after the dictionary plan and on the usual catalog 
cards, for all new standard works published after January, 1894, 
as well, so far as is practicable, for books already in print ; these 
cards to be sent at intervals as printed, to such libraries as shall 
be subscribers to the plan. Circulars of information and sample 
cards for criticisms and suggestions have already been issued, and 
any immediate prospect of having our card catalog with printed 
instead of with type-written entries, is indeed a consummation 
devoutly to be wished. The printed entries are superior in every 
way, being perfectly legible, distinctly clear and beautifully 
neat. When the cards are received, the '' call numbers " of the 
library's books will be written on their respective cards by the 
cataloger, together with perhaps minor additions, or corrections 
of imprint data in the case of cards for older books. 

LIBRARY STAFF. 

There have been a number of changes in the staff of em- 
ployees, four of the number having resigned. There have been 
added to the regular staff, one night attendant and two half day 
attendants, all graduates of the training class. The staff now 
numbers eighteen persons : Librarian, assistant librarian, princi- 
pal reference department, eight regular day attendants, includ- 
ing cataloger, three regular night attendants, two night and half 
day attendants, and two half day attendants. This is one person 
less than the pay roll of last year showed. The vacancies caused 
by resignations have been filled by promotions, according to civil 
service rule. 



LOS ANGELEB PUBLIC LIBRARY* 27 

TRAINING CLASS. 

The applicants who have been examined for admission since 
the organization of the classes, viz., ist November, 1891, to date, 
number sixty ; thirty-one of these have been accepted ; twenty- 
three have completed the first course, and sixteen of these at- 
tained an average of over 70 per cent, in the examination enti- 
tling them to a certificate. Five pupils have entered the second 
course and will take the final second course examination in Janu- 
ary next. Of the sixteen certificated pupils, nine are holding 
positions in this library. Since the inauguration of the training 
classes the library has had 20,742 hours of gratuitous service 
firom pupils. 

IN GEanSBAL. 

One of the most important events of the year affecting the 
wel&re of the library, was the World's Congress of Librarians 
and the Annual Conference of the American Library Association 
held at Chicago, July last, and both of which your librarian 
attended as an authorized delegate and representative from this 
library. It is not necessary to recapitulate the full report made 
to you of these important sessions, except in so far as to again 
call attention to the invaluable assistance every opportunity to 
confer with active librarians upon library matters brings with it. 
The careful examination of appliances and methods, cannot but 
prove other than an advantageous factor in the economical ad- 
ministration of our library. 

The exhibit sent from this library to the World's Fair, 
formed a part of a very complete and interesting library exhibit, 
made by the Bureau of Education, and which upon its return, 
will be sent to the California Midwinter Fair to form a part of the 
educational exhibit there. 

The thoughtful consideration' by the public of the figures 
set forth in this report is earnestly solicited. All who are 
members of the library realize sufficiently the discomforts of 
using the library as at present, in overcrowded rooms, and with 
but meagerly supplied shelves. There is but one remedy, and 
that to a great degree is in the hands of the public itself. 

The officers of the institution can only plead for an im- 
provement of existing conditions in the name of the public, but 
the voice of the public must be heard guaranteeing favor and 



88 BSPOBT .OF BOAIU) OF DIBECTOBB 

support. The few thousands cut from the estimate of necessary 
expense from year to year mean more noise, more confusion, 
poorer service and fewjer books. 

The contemplated change in ihe charging system wiU in a 
large measure regulate the evils of the present ^y^stem, hut 
cannot do away with the crowds of people who gather at the 
delivery desk, and must wait there before being able to make any 
selection of new books. This oongregation of people at one point 
can only be mitigated by the establishment of deliver stations, 
l>y jrhibh the outlying districts would be given a daily fiorvice. 

Another serious detriment to ihe best usefulness of the 
library has been the lack oi means to print catalogs, lists, 
bulletins and other guides that might be distributed for leisurely 
consultation at home. As it is, one-half of the contents of the 
lij:ura;ry i9 in such form, the record of the remainder e;^i3ting 
only in nianuscript at the librfiry. These serious drawb^ckp to 
the jproper exercise of the business part of the library xiec;^ssitate 
a suspension of ;work in aLinopt all the interior departments and 
a detention of the entire staff of employees on ^' desk duty." This 
unsatisfactory state of affairs can only be betteiied by a realize - 
tipn of its results and a decisive actipn on the part of the library 
gatronp \f> ward off a ruijaous ^congestion of the library's forces. 

TESSA L. KBLSO, 

lAbrarian. 



LOS ANGELES iPDBLIC LIBRARY. 29 



GLA55IFI6fi' LIST OF RECORDS 

C9 THJ5 

Los Angeles Public Library. 



I 



To enligliteQ the current belief that the entire work of a public librar^ con- 
siflte merely of the taking in and the giving out of books, the following tables haye 
been compiled. They show the records kept in the several departments of this 
library, and give a fair idea of the essentials which go to make ap the daily 
routine of the libraiy. 

ACC£SSION DEPARTMENT. 

(a) For Books. Dated and numbered blank containing list of books to be 
ordered by the library, with estimated price per volume and total cost ; list 
to be api^roved by a majority of the Book Committee of the Board of 
Directors, before the order becomes valid. 

(6) For Supplies. Bame as above only containing items of needed supplies, 
stationery, etc., a^d requiring approval by a migority of the Supply 
Committeei 

6ta8slfied^ ^ecessloii Blank. 

Ust of books arranged by class (history, science, fiction, etc.) and previously 
appiov^ by the Book Committee; showing at a ^anoe the relative esti- 
mated amount to be spent on each class, together with total estimated cost 
of entire older. 

<frAir BtaiAi. 

Purchase list of books made fort!he dealer or agent, and to whom it is mailed 
after being duplicated in the letter book. The list is indexed by author 
and itemized by title, publisher, date, and also by estimated cost per 
Tolume; ^iVhldi' last column of items is detached ahd retained by the 
libraty f6r oomparisop' with aiitual cost upon rebeipt of the lot of books. 

^ffSfff Book. 

The library's permanent record of all books which it has ordered. It is 
made in conjunction with the order blank, books being indexed by 
author, and itemized by title, date of the order, from whom ordered, and 
date of receipt of each book ; the last item being added as the various 
orders materialise. 

jMiosftlbtf ikooi.* 

ihe library's chief record, containing' a complete history of each volume on 
its shelves, and in which each volume is entered and numbered in the 



30 BBPOBT OF BOARD OF DIBECTOBB 

order of its aoquiaition bj the library; the last number in the book show- 
ing the actual number of volumes in the library up to date, and the 
number acquired between any two dates being readily ascertained by 
subtracting the number opposite the earlier date from that of the later 
date. The items which may be ascertained from the Aooession Book con- 
cerning any volume in the library, are the following : 

1. Accession number. 

2. Glass number. (Beligion, sociology, etc.) 

3. Binding. (Qoth, leather, etc.) 

4. No. of the vol. (In a work of two or more vols.) 
6. Author. 

6. Title. 

7. Place of publication, and name of publisher. 

8. Date of publication. 
' 9. No. of pages. 

10. Size. (Octavo, quarto, etc.) 

11. Name of dealer from whom purchased. 

12. Cost. 

13. Remarks. (No. of maps, plates, etc., a volume may contain ; additional 
cost of binding in the case of magazines ; etc., etc.) 

As reference to the accession book is made by means of a volume's accession 
number, any disputed or uncertain points concerning cost, valuable illustra- 
tions, etc., in the case of a borrower's losing his book, can be very quickly 
found and at once settled by proof positive. Also in the case of an exact 
duplicate of a lost or missing book being desired by the library, the 
accession book is invaluable. Briefly, the accession book is the reservoir 
of the library's information concerning each and every volume that it owns. 

donation Book. 

Contains record of all books, pamphlets, reports, bulletins, magazines, etc., 
received by the library as gifts. Donations are indexed by name of donor, 
giving also date and the number of books, etc. donated. The donation 
book is supplementary to the accession book, and its entries form an 
appendix to the Librarian's Yearly Report. 

Shelf list. 

A brief and only inventory of the books as they stand on the library's shelves, 
giving each book's accession number, author, title and book number. Its 
chief use is as a guide in the library's annual " taking account of stock," 
showing exactly what books or volumes of a book are missing. The shelf 
list also serves as a brief subject catalog of the library's books on any 
special subject, each general class of books, (philosophy, travels, etc.,) com- 
prising a separate shelf list. As subject catalogSi the shelf lists are often 
consulted by the public, being the only catalogs on the sulgect plan that 
the library has. 

FroeesB Undergone by a New Book Before it is Beady for Cirenlation. 

1. Checked from the itemized invoice sent by the dealer, and the price of 
the volumes entered on its title page. 



LOS AKQELEB PUBLIC LIBRARY. 31 

2. Date of its receipt bj the library, stamped in the order book. 

3. Classified. (A review of its contents or general character determining 
whether it shall be classed with botany, English history, electricity or 
fiction, as the case may be.) 

4. Collated. (Each page looked over, leaves cut if neoeasary, and all im- 
perfections noted ; if the latter are of sufficient importance, the book is re- 
turned to the dealer. Each collated boek is checked with the special mark 
of the attendant through whose hands it has passed.) 

5. Entered in the accession book. (The book's accession number being 
written on its title page, and at the head of the first chapter. Also the 
date of accession is stamped at the foot of the title page. ) 

6. Entered in the shelf list. (Which entiy determines the shelf number ' 
of the book ; its dass number being given when it is classified. The class 
and shelf numbers together constitute the *' book number/') 

7. Plated, labeled and pocketed. (The " book number" is printed by hand 
upon the plate, label and book card. The two former are pasted on the 
book, and the latter is slipped into the pocket and is used in the charging 
of the book at the delivery desk. Seven or four day books are designated 
by specially printed labels.) 

8. Embofised. (The libraiy's mark of ownership is stamped on certain 
pages throughout the book with the embossed stamp.) 

9. Cataloged. (An author, title and one or more subject cards if necessary, 
are typewritten for each book, and filed in the^ drawers of the card catalog 
cases in the delivery and book rooms.) 

10. Piled on the " truck," wheeled to the book room, and put on the shelves. 

B£N1>£BT AND REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

Bindery Book. 

Contains a record of each volume that the library has had bound or rebound. 
Books are indexed in it by title, giving also author, name of bindeiy firm 
to whom sent, style of binding to be used, number of the volume in case of 
magasines and works of two or more volumes, price, book number, date 
sent, and space for entry of date of return from the binder. 

Preparation of Bookg for the Bindery. 

1. Collated. (If pages are missing, the book is discarded.) 

2. Bindery tags written. (Slips of paper fastened to the book and contain- 
ing full information for the binder as to how the book shall be bound. 
When the book is returned to the library, all points of the binder's work 
are compared with the data given on the tags. If there are errors, the 
book is resent to the binder for corrections.) 

Preparation of a Newly Bound or Bebonnd Book for Cirenlatlon. 

1. Checked from invoice sent by the binder. 

2. Compared with the bindery tag. 

3. Date of return stamped in bindery book and on inside of back cover of 
the book itself. 

4. Collated. 



82 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

5. Aoceeaioned. (Only however in the case of magazineB, or new books not 
previously entered in the accession book.) 

6. Plated, pocketed and book card printed. 

7. Embossed. (If a newly bound magazine or book. Rebound books, etc. 
needing not to be aooessioned, embossed or cataloged.) 

8. Cataloged. (In cases similar to Numbers 6 and 7.) 

Surgeon's List. 

Daily record of the number of volumes repaired, mended, etc, in the work 
room of the library. As each day always has' its quota of disabled volumes, 
the surgeon's list is one of the many records in constant use. 

Miscarded Bidok. 

Contains a record of all books discarded. Books are indexed by author, in- 
cluding the date when discarded, the accession and book numbers of each 
book, and its title, 'the records of the discarded book also serve as an ad- 
ditional check in the taking account of stock. Discarded books are usually 
disposed of as donations to the jail, reform school, etc. 

MAIL AND MAILING DtEPiiltTMENT. 

Periodical Order List. 

Alphabetical list of periodicals subscribed for by the library. The list is 
typewritten on cards such as are used in the card catalog, and under each 
periodical are given the following items : 

1. Year of the subscription. 

2. From what dealer ordered. 

3. Number of copies ordered. 

4. Date when ordered. 
6. Oost per copy. 

6. Date of espiration of subscription. 

The records are permanenti easily accessible, and for purposes of reference^ 
invaluable. 

Periodical Check Lists. 

Two in number ; one for dailies and weeklies, and the other for fortnightlies, 
monthlies, quarterlies, etc In the former, the receipt of each periodical 
is indicated by entering the number of copies received, in the dated space 
correspondiilg to the date borne by the periodical which' is being entered ; 
the blank spaces of past dates showing the non-recdipt of the issues of 
those dates. Li the second check list thd dat6 of the periodical's receipt, 
together with the number of copies received, is written in thd monthly 
space corresponding to the month of the periodical's issue. Thns in both 
lists the vacancies opposite past dates show the non-receipf of certain 
issues; notices of such non-receipt are sent to the dealer, and if the £uilt 
be his, restitution is requested. 

Preparation of Periodioals for Circulation* 

1. Entered in check lists. 

2. Numbered. (The several copies of an issue being numbered consecutively 
on their covers.) 



• 



I 

t 



LOS ANGBLSa PUBLIC LIBBABY. 83 

8. Stamped. (With an inked stamp bearing the libxaiy'B mark of owner- 
■hip. Dailies are neither nunbered nor stamped.) 

4. Filed. (Dailies and weeklies for the reading rooms, on newspaper loims 
and on sticks. Weeklies, monthlies^ etc, for reading room ose^ on sticks, 
or in leather covers. Those for dicalation, in leather, linen, or paper 
coTers; plated and labeled '' 4 daji^" the labels on back numbers being 
changed to '^ 7 days." 

5. EngraTings, patterns^ designs, colored plates, etc, accompanying certain 
magariiles, as the illustrated weeklies, art jonmalsy etc, are taken out and 
mounted on sheets of tag board, clasBified,'plated and drcolated the same as 
books. Teachers in the primary grades find them yery nsefdl in language 
work. 

MaillBg list. 

Alphabetical list of names and ad dros B cs of those who are subscribers to the 
monthly Bolletin issaed by the library, or of those with whom the library 
makes exchanges of bolletins, reports, finding lists, etc 

Letter Book. 

Contains duplicate copies of all letters, communications, orders, etc, written 
and sent by the library. 

CATALOGING BEPABTMENT. 

Begvlar. 

Constitutes the book entries which are designed to form part of the permanent 
catalog of the library. These entries are usually under the book's author, 
title^ subject or subjects, and form ; the latter entry refers to literary form — 
poetry, essays, etc Entries are typewritten on cards and are arranged 
alphabetically by their headings, constituting a catalog on what is known 
as the ^ dictionary '' plan, in which entries are looked for in the same way 
as words are hunted in a dictionary. The cards are filed in drawers, and 
make the " card '' catalog, from which in time a printed catalog may be 
made. The advantage of the card catalog is that it can be kept strictly up 
to date, new entries being inserted as fast as ready and in their proper 
alphabetical places. At present the catalog of books on history, 
geography, travels, literature and fiction is complete and up to date. 

BvlletlB. 

Comprises brief entries of all books acquired by the libraiy since the printing 
of the Finding list. Entries are typewritten on cards and are especially 
designed as copy for the printer who prints the Bulletins, which constitute 
the Appendix to the Finding List. If no bulletins are being printed, these 
cards are filed in drawers for the use of the public. Up to date, eleven 
printed bulletins have been Issued by the library. 

SyoeiaL 

Consists of separate catalogs of special subjects, which for purposes of more 
ready use^ or from special public demand for them, or on account of the 
library's making a specialty of books on particular rabjects, ftre at present 



8ft BSMM OF 'MAftb or IttftBOMU 

made wd kept diidnot from tin gmiuiil ottiJog of thh Wmmty mw in 
pFOgnsB. Among tii«w qieebl ortalogi sn tlMte of Mkm, dnuot^ miisict 
•verTthiag ptttainiog to G»lifbkiil% and ottar imftUor liits wiikh a«B the 
otttgrowth of tbe needs of tenekwni popOi^fllniw^ etc 



BEOISTBATIOK DEPABTHHNT. 

SecttritlM* 

Blanks which are filled out hy bonoirersy signed bjr ibeir goaniiifeOTSy and 
Irhich tfter ippraral and filgnitinre by tlie librariia or some aMmber of 
the Board, are sUunped "ApproTed," dated, and filed alphabetidallj by 
borrowerR' names, in monUily groups. Each month, the ile of wstifiliiB 
belonging to that month, are eacssnined. Tliose lUting dne or expiring 
daring the month, are segregated and notices of expiration are ssnt to the 
borrowers in whoee names theseonrities aie made oat When new seoori- 
ties haye been presented at the libraiy, the old ones are destrojed and the 
former filed in thttr places. 

Registers* 

Two ; one for men, and one for women, in which a new member of the 
library signs his or lier name with address, as recognition of, and agreement 
to abide by the rales and regulations of the library. After the borrower's 
name and address, that of his guarantor is entered by the registiy vlsik. 
Each borrower's name in the legistiy book is preceded by a number which 
corresponds to that on the card issued to him, and reisrence to him in this 
book is always made by this munber, called the bortower's **card namber." 

Bdr lowers' Card Iiidot. 

Alphabetical list of borrowers' names, together with their addresses, card 
numbers, dates of becoming members of the library, guarantor^ names and 
addresses, with also dates of withdrawals and renewals of membershipf 
changes of address, amounts and dates of unpaid fines, and any other 
necessary information bearing upon the boxrowen^ relations with the 
library. The borrowers' card index is in fiM^ a permanent and complete 
record of the library's members, as such. If any member has abused the 
privileges of the library, thehe is made a record which stands, and which 
debars that person from all future library priyileges^ even though ma^ 
years later; this of ooorse^ proTided the offoice warrants so complete a 
sospension of priWlegss. Bot in any case, the record stands. 

euaruton* Card Index. 

Alphabetical list of those persons who hare acted or are acdng as guarantors 
to library members, giving addresses and the numbers of the cards of those 
for whom they stand security. This index like the preceding, is kept 
strictly up to date, and all information necessary to the libraiy, notMi tad 
preserved. In case of a goarantor's fsUaxe to comply with his fbnetion as 
such, a reotMd will stand against Ids re w s nming of sooh te^ponrfMity at a 
fiituretime. 



LOS iJf«BLB8 P0BUC LIBKABY. 86 

A boRowenf list amnged hj card nnmben^ and inoladiog names and 
addniMii ^ il a noord of Hia <^liv<e" BMinb€nhip of the Wbnrj i» 
kep^ showing liov maof oMoibaii an aoliiaiyj drawing books. The 
bonowei^a oard ia rtawpod al the chaigiag desk with a laiga "98/' the 
nnmber of tho«s«sdthoB sMunpoi Mag notedly the attaadant; at the end 
of the daj, all card nombers so obtained are compared with the cards of 
the Nomber Index bearing; the comsponding card nnmbers, and these 
cards are stamped with the corrent date, showing that the persons owning 
such cards haye drawn books on that date. All cards so stamped daj b j 
dagr aie fiM hj thamaalYes, gMog ai cooe bj oeont, the niiinbar of the 
library's acUve members. This proca« of .^smping cia be taken np at 
interrals daring a year and continned as long as wished. Unleis a library's 
system of chaiging books can ftumish data aa lo its live membership, this 
plan or some oUier is a neoesrity, for the number of memben enrolled in 
the Registry Books is not bj any means a correct index of the Hbraiy 
memberdiip. Membeis are constantly leaving the city who make no 
report of it to the UhxiHy, and then also many who take oat cards of 
membetahip ose them alewtames snd then let them lie idle for months 
perhaps. But by this ohecking op prooeas, the libraiy can ascertain 
within a reasonably correct namber, jost what its actiye membership is. 



liOAK DEPABTMENT, INOIiUDIKG SCHOOLS. 

]|«||y ClrevlattAn JK^e«^.4. 

Daily record of the nomber of books ciroalated in each daai for home, 
library and reference ose, with daily and monthly totals for each class, and 
grand totals of each month's entire drcolation. These records are 
obtained from the paper slips used in charging the books as they go oat 
for drcolation. &eh day's slips are arranged in class groaps (^ction, 
histoid, etcOi |m4 ibep aab-acraMSed aJipt^abetically in fiction and 
magswnei^ and namec|cally in other C9f«k From these reports is also 
made a shorter one giving only the grand total of each day's drcolation, 
with an additional total of the month's drcolation ap to date. 

VellMqwenti' BeMrd. 

Record of ail oTerdoe book% giring every detail and item of ii^ormatian 
necessaiy to the settling of the aooomii with the deUnqnent bosower. 
After the aoooont ia finally settf ed with the bomnrer, ail items connected 
with the settlement are entered ap^ making a complete balanced and per- 
manent account with book and borrower. 

fklioel Roeerds. 

A- qliarifled a«ditotai.r«iord.i(ijnf»4e.of the nnmber of hooka .oiMnlated to 
each of thacilr ■abqela drawing jiooks .ftom Ae Ubracy* Mmom record of 
^ jmDher ,qf ,t^aohws 4^W^« W^p /9r school ^ .b^des an accqant of 
)f ^^jfjfjmm mM^tb to the fobools dumiiM^^fMir* 



d6 REPORT OF BOARD OF DtRSCTORfi 



BEFEBBNCE AND BEADING BOOMS. 

A daily reoord of the nnmber of visiton in these rooms is kept, as well as the 
number of magazines and books issued for libnuy use. In the referenoe 
department is recorded a list of questions asked upon suljects generally im- 
portant, usefbl, curious, or othei-wise worth attention. 



SUPPIiT DEPABTMENT. 

Stoek Book. 

Indexed list of all supplies, stationerj, blanks, etc, bought by the library. 
To each item entered is affixed : 

1. Quantity ordered. 

2. Style, form or quality. 

3. Date of purchase. 

4. Price. 

5. From whom purchased. 

When ordering new supplies, the data in this book are invaluable, giving as 
they do, the exact points needed if duplicate goods are wished and showing 
what to avoid should previous articles have been unsatisfM^ry. 

Form Book. 

Blank book in which are pasted samples of each blank (cards, notices, letter 
headsi etc.), that the library has used or is using. Each blank is numbered, 
and the number entered with it in the stock book, so that by referring to 
the latter and obtaining the number of a blank, its sample may be found by 
turning to that number in the form book. The form and stock books are 
complementary to each other. 

STATISTICS, BEPOBTS» ETC. 

Book's Aceonnt. 

Brief monthly epitome of the records in the accession, discarded, bindery and 
donation books; periodical order list; and surgeon's list, with items as 
follows : 

1. Number of volumes in each dasB, acquired during the month. 

2. Number of volumes discarded. 
8. Number of volumes bound. 

4. Number of volumes lost or missing. 

5. Number of volumes, magazines, etc., donated. 

6. Number of periodicals added. 

7. Nnmber of volumes mended. 

Monthly Boeord. 

Monthly epitome of the Daily Circulation Becord, Books' Account, and the 
records of the Registration Department Itemised as follows : 

1. Books droulated. a. Home, with number of days library was open. 
b. Beading room, with number of days library was open. e. Total, with 



LOS ANOKLX8 PUBLIC UBRABY. 87 

rnunber of dajB libraiy was open, d, Befsfeaoe room, with number of 
days libraiy was open. «• Schook) with number of days sent to ichools. 
/. Daily average cucnlation. g. Laigeatday, A. SmaUeatdaj. 

2. Books added. a« Books. 6. MagasineB. 

a. Books discarded. 

4. Books lost and paid for. 

6. Books mended. 

6. Books rebound. 

7. Notioes sent. 

8. Donations reoeiTed. 

9. Registration, a. Withdrawals, b, Benewab. e. New members, 
d. ToUd. 

libraiiftii's Montlily Beport* 

Made to the Board of Directors, and epitonuaed from the records of the 
Monthly Beooid, and the book-keeper's records. 

Teftrlj Report of the Board of Diroetorg and of the Librarian. 

Made to the members of the City Connelly and indnding whaterer is desired 
or necessary from the many minor reoordsi reports, etc., kept by the library. 

FIsoal Tear Boport. 

An estimate of the necessary fluids required for the year's expenses of main- 
tainiog the library, presented to the OounoQ on or before the 15th July 
of each year. 

MISOEIiUUnSOUS BBCOBDS. 

Book-keeping. 

Book-keeper's reoords of all fines, dues, sundries, (Books lost and paid for, 
duplicates sold, etc) and apportionmenti^ reoeiTed by the library; and 
reoords of all salaries, sundries (supplies, printing, flimiture, etc.), books 
and periodicals paid for by the library. 

Time JBoflgter* 

Blank book so arranged that each attendant registers the hours that she is 
due at the libraiy for duty, morning,, afternoon, or evening as the cases 
may be. These reoords are kept as an index of the time deportment of 
each attendant, and influenoe to an extent her chances for promotion. 

Bokodnlo for flonra. 

A weekly schedule indicating hours and posts of duty of each attendant 

Letter and BUI FUos. 

Special cases or boxes in which are filed all letters, bills, etc., reoeiyed by the 
library ; and so placed and arranged that ready reference is possible. 



88 BSMM OF BOiJU) OT UrBBOVOBS 



CliSSfflED USI i)F THE POimTiilS, m. 



OF THX 



Los Angeles Public Library. 



Q«n«nl Finding Ust; oomplMe to Jnlj, 1891. 

Fiction Lost in English; oomplete to Joly^ l99iL 

JtnFoijae Lirt; .QOivptiBto to Ji;Jj, 1991. 

Bolletins; (11 in nomW) ismd-fjrom NoYomber, 1891, to Fe^ruuy, 1898^ 
giving lifltB of books reoeiTed since the printing of the General Finding 
ListyOonstitatingaaanMndiZ'to the latter, «nd indodiog aiso epeeial 
litlB on the Ibttowing sal^eoli: Vjomc, edaoilaon^ noyeli oi American 
lifi»( gUssisw and iee age <pafaUilMd dio in leaflet /onn for the Unity 
Club) ; faiiy tales; Ohristmas stories, poems, pll>7s, e^.; agricaltare in 
California ; reading list for children uider twelve years of age. 

Fiction List in English a^id fogreign languages; new ed., complete to Not., 
1898. 

UNPUBIJSHI&D CATALOGS. 

Dictionary Card Catalog of history, trayels, biography and llteratore. 

Special Card Oalalegs of ielion, mosio, dvnnaaad OalUbmia. 

Reference lists (typewritten on cards) on the following snljects : Christmas, 
Histoiy of the 18th and 14th Centories, Middle Ages, PMeetion and 
Fkee Trade, fifasioal 9togra|^y, WItittier, Tennyson, Loweii, Dante. 

MieeeHaneoos lists on sHtjeols widch-from time to time have been of current 
interest and comprising, among othen^ biief listi on Decoration Day, 
ThankigiTing Day, Longfellt>w, Odnmbiis^ Q. Yf* OMm, J. W. Biley, 
P^nia, Physieal Coltors^ Wood Engraving, Jupiter, SatniOi IfooQ* 

l^jppewritten list of the libraiy's bopks, (1079 vols.) on religion. I^eventy- 
five CQ(pies of this list were duplicated on the cyclostyle^ and mailed to 
the ministers and deigjmen qf the city. 

"RA^ Dictionary Card Catalof qf a^ i|ew boolcs ap cnrrently received. This 
list is used as ** copy " for the printing of the Bulletins^ but until in 
fbr this purpose the cards are filed and placed 4B4he<casA ^cateleg' 



MISOBlULAinBOUS PUBUOAnOHflh 

Four Annual Reports ; Dec 1889, Jan. 1891, Dec. 1891, and Dec. 1892. 
Bules and Eolations; four editions: Aug. 1889, 8^t. 1890, June 1891, 

andOot.1898. The last edition revised and indnding alw a handbook 

of general information of the library. 
Annmnieement No.1 of the library Training dasi^ July 1893. 



iiOB umiMB ftnoiio ubhabt. 



LIST OF DONATIONS 

TO THE 

Los Angeles Public Libraiy 

» 



s:, . -T' r .i 



Arail»r,F.L 

Allen. C.C 

Amencftn Antlqiiarfan Society (Woroester, Msm.). 

AmMcftn lAmij AMoeiation 

Amerleftn Unitarian Soelety 

Amhent College 



Bangor, Me., Pablie Llbiary 

BariDWf, H. D 

Batlenea Pablie library (London^ Eng.) 
Behbont Bcbool, City 



Bengottgbt Hiii S. . 

Bfmlngnam (Bng.)'Pnblle library 



BoaKm Athennum. 

iton Muwnm of Fine Arts 

m Pttblie Library 

>wdoin College 

ler , J. L. 

Dr.N 

BrisIRd (Eng.) Free library 

BroMtton Fublic Library. 

Broetriek. W. J 

BroBson library (Waterbory, Conn.). 

Bzookllne (Maai.) Pnblie Library 



«« 



n 



M 



Brooklyn Pnblic Library 

Brown, Leroy D. 

Brown, Belah 

Bryn Mawr College 

BnflbloHletorieal Society 

Bntte (Mont) Pnblic Library 

Calliomia Aeademy of Seienoee 

" Adjutant General 

Bank CommiMionen 

Senate Committee 

State Board of Hortieoltare 

State Mining Bnieau 

State TJnlTenity 

" Superintendent of Public Inetractlon . 

CannonrMarion. 

Oanliir (Bng.) Free Litaary 

Camigie Flee Library, Penn 

Carr.Miw. J.C 

Cbapman, Bnth 

Chieago Board of Xdncation 

Cincinnati Mneenm AMoeiation. 

" Public Ubrary 

CknrAland Public Library 

ColltoiuH.O 

CdloMo Bureau of Labor 

Columbia College 

Connecticut Hiatorical Society. 



■MiAav 



m^b* 



la 



1 

8 



m 

8 



1 
1 



[ 



u 



'i' 



1 



I 

18 
8 

Muiie (labeali) 

10 

2 

1 

1 

a 

) 1 

Blank! 

8 

Blaakfe 

4 



8 

2 



8 
1 
i 
1 
8 



2 

2 

Blanks 

8 



\ 



4 

1 

U 

1 



1 

a 

Blanks 
1 



40 



RBPOBT OF BOARD OF DIBECTORB 



Cornell University 

Council Bluib (la.) Public Library. 

Cox, Jordan 

Croydon Libraries (Bng.) 

Cutler, C. A 

Davidson, Dr. A 

Dayton (O.} Public Library 

Denver Bureau of Labor Statlstios. 



", PubUc Library. 



Des Moines (la.) PubUc Library 
Detroit Public Library 



Dobinson,O.A 

Dundee (Scot.) Free Library 

DunlaptMrs. 

Edwards, Wm. M 

Enoch Pratt Free Library 

Field. Chief Justice. 

Fletcher Public Library (Burlington, Vt.). 

Ford, Mrs. E. G 

Friesner, W. M. 



Grand Rapids Public Library. 

Hammersmith (Eng.) Free Library. 

Hancock, Mrs 

Hartford Library AsBodatlon 

" PubUc Library 

Harvard University. 



Hilgard,B.W 

Howard, Mrs. Mary 

Howard Memorial Library (New Orleans). . 

Hume, Mrs ^ 

Indian Rights Association 

Indianapolis Public Library 

Iowa Columbian Commission 

Jamaica Commission, World's Fair 

Japan Bureau of Commerce and Industry 

^* " " Education 

« Meteorological System 

Jersey City (N . Jji Free Library 

Johns Hopldns Hospital 

" University 

Kanaas State Historical Society 

Kinney, Abbott 

Leland Stanford Jr. University 

Library Record 

Long Lsland Historical Society 

Los Angeles High School 

" Occidental College. 

" University Bank 

Lowdermilk, H. W 

Lowe, Prof 

Lucas, W.W 

Luckenbaoh, C. A 



Books 



2 

1 
1 



4 
6 



81 



14 



1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 



Lynn (Mass.) Free Library 

M^M^^in, B, W 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Mexican Central Railroad Co , 

Michigan State University 

Miller, Mrs. M. H 



Milwaukee Public Library 

Minneapolis Public Library 

Minnesota Historical Society 

Monroe, W. S 

Naas (Sweden) Manual Training School. 

Nebraska Historical Society 

New Bedford Public Library 

New Haven Public Library 

" Young Men's Institute 

New York Free Circulation Library 

Mercantile Library 

State liibrary 



tt 



8 



4 

1 



1 

1 
4 
1 
1 
9 

Blanks 
1 
8 

Blanks 



1 
1 



1 
i' 



1 
8 



2 
8 

< Blanks 
2 

4 
1 



10 
1 



i 

4 

4 
1 
27 
2 
2 
8 
8 
1 



2 
1 
6 



1 
Blanks 



1 
1 
4 
Blanks 
8 
1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
8 
1 
1 
1 
6 



■"■ "■■W-^»^»T.~'»»"'.^~."^»"^»r" 



IWBl 



LOS ANGBLS8 PUBLIC LEBBABY. 



41 



New York State Belonnatory. . . 

» " Univenlty 

" Teeehen' Collm. . . . 

" Yoaiig Men's Cnrittli 
Newark Pablie library 



an AMOclatioa 



Ne w b er r y library 

Newcaetle (N. B. W.) Sohool of ArU. 



Newton (Man.) Public Library. 

Norwich (Sng.) Free Library. . . 

Oberlin College 

Omaha PnbUe library 

Oaterhout Public Library 

Pennaylvanla Dental College. . . 

Peoila (ni.) Public Library 



Patenon 



White lilyraiT (Marquette, Mloh.). 
ion (N. J.) Public Library 



Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arte 
Apprenuoea' library. . 



«< 

w 
l« 



Pawtucket Public Ltbrary 

y of 
Appreni 
CitylnsUtute 
Mercantile Library. 

Pllklngton, Dr. J.B 

Pomona College, Calif 

Piatt Institute. Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 

Princeton (N. J.) College 

Providence (B. h) Athenaum 



«( 



Public Library 

Blill 



Boehdale (Bug.) Public library. . . . 

Bowan, T. E 

Sacramento (Calil) Public Library. 

St Louis Mercantile Library 

** Public Library 



St. Paul Public Library 

Salem PabUc Library 

San Frandsoo Public Library. 

Sanders, M. A 

Savory, G.W 

Sohioeder, H. and A 

Beranton (Penn.) Public Library.. . 

Sheffield (Bug.) Public Library . . . . 

Shinn. C. H 

Sidney (N. 8. W.) Free Library 

ffml ^h ■nnia.n Inatltute 

Mngfleld (Mass.) PubUc Library. 

Siine. M. H 

Btiadley , Dr. W. B 

Teed, F.O 



Tteonto Public Library , 

Treble Clef Club (City) 

U. 8. Bureau of American Bepubllcs 

•• Education 

Coast and Geodetic Survey 

Commissioner of Labor 

" Patents 

" Ballioads 

Department of Agriculture 

Interior , 



«« 

M 
« 

tt 



U 



M 
•• 
41 
M 
M 
fl 
It 
■< 



tt 
tt 



Treasury 

War 

Fish Commissioners. 

House of Bepresentatives. 

Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Postmaster-General 

Superintendent of Indian Schools. 

'* Burgeon-OeneraL 

Wallace, Mugh 

Waltham (Mass.) PubUc Library... 

Ward, J. 8 

Warren Ca (IlL) Public libiary 

Washington State Poultry Association. . 



Books. 



8 
1 



8 



1 

X7 

2 



1 
6 



181 



12 
2 



1 

1 

19 



Pamphlitb. 



11 
8 
1 
1 
7 

Blanks 
1 
1 

Blanks 
1 
2 
1 
7 
1 
4 

Blanks 

Blanks 
1 
4 
1 
4 
1 
2 



Blanks 
1 

Blanks 
2 



Blanks 
1 

Blanks 
1 

BUnks 

24 

1 

1 



2 
Blanks 

1 
6 Maps 

9 

12 



2 Maps 

JBhinks 
7 

4 
4 
1 
8 
2 
1 
28 

{ lAtlas 

2 

8 Atlases 



6 
2 

1 
1 



1 
1 
2 
1 



42 



B8P0BT OF BOARD OF DIBKCTOBS. 



Welleflley College 

Weslyan Unlvenity 

Weymouth, A. B 

White, Hon. Stephen M. 

Wlc]a,M.L 

Winaor, Jnstln 



Witoonaln State HlBtorioal Society 

" Superintendent of Sohooli. 

Wolverhampton (Bng.) Free Library 

Worcester (Moas.) Public library 

Wyman, O. M 

Yale Unlvenity 

Youngvlown (O.) Public library 



Total 



BOOKB. 



191 



728 



1 
8 



1 
8 
Blanka 
1 
1 
Blanks 
1 



2 

I Blanka 

AMPampieui 
29 acta of Blanka 

QAtlasM 

7Mape 



# 



f 



II 






ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



■ 17 ■■ ,' 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Iios flogeles Pablie IiibFaFV 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN. 



Ik. 



1893-94. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



« 

Iios ^ijgeles Public Library 



AND 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



J 

.(rj'AIAAi) 

Dbcbmbbr, 1894. .,.. " '.,*?/? 
A 



LOS ANGELES PCBUG IIBSASY. 



Directors. 



G. A. DOBINSON, President. 
SHELDON BORDEN, FRANK H. HOWARD, 

W. J. HAMILTON, W. A. SPALDING. 



. c;o/nminKs. 



BOOKS AND DOKATIONS. 

F. H. Howard, W. A. Spalding. 

bulbs and administbation. 

Shbldon Bordbn, F. H. Howard. 

auditing and accounts. 

W. J. Hamilton, W. A. Spaldino. 

PBINTING AND SUPPLIES. 

W. J. Hamilton, F. H. Howard. 

ATTENDANTS. 

G. A DoBiNsoN, Shbldon Bordbn, W. A. Spalding. 



Tbssa L. Kblso, Clerk and Librarian, 
Adblaidb R. Hassb, Assistant Librarian, 
EsTBLLB Hainbs, Principal Reference Department, 

attendants. 

Cblia Glbason, Harriet Mercer, 

Nellie Rubs, Bertha Pierce, 

Elizabeth Fargo, Anna Austin, 

CoRiNNB Wise, Florence Thornburg, 

Mattie Tedpord, Nora Miller, 

Leila Kingsley, Anna Becklby, 

Gertrude Darlow, Mary Johnson, 

Mable Dunn, Blanche Putnam, 

Edith Moore, Pearl Gleason, 

Anna Earl. 



".••' ••^' i?95 





i 

i 
I 



yu^ g^ix ♦ «r«.vM 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THB 



ipS /)f((JECE5 pilBCI"? gBF^/ll^Y 



December, 1894. 






The Honorable Council of the City of Los Angeles: 
G^ntlbmen: 

In Accordance with law, we present herewith the annual 
report of the Los Angeles Public Library for the library year 
ending Nov. 30th, 1894. 

Before proceeding to the financial and statistical data presented 
in the report of the Librarian, we deem it appropriate to review 
briefly the history of the Library for the past five years, since its 
most substantial development has taken place within that period. 

The Library was opened to the public in the quarters now 
occupied, on the 2nd of September, 1889, and then began business 
under the provisions of the new charter. There were then 6356 
books on the shelves, of which a large proportion were public 
documents, and the circulating books were much worn and con- 
sisted, to a great extent, of incomplete sets. The active member- 
ship was 132. We have no data from which to state what had 
been the circulation of books prior to that time, but it is safe to 
say that not over 3500 volumes were available and suitable for 
home use. 

The first important step was the organization of the Library 
in a systematic manner; the next, the addition of a large number 
of new books, and, thirdly, to dispense with all membership fees» 



4 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

making the Library entirely free. The liberal and enterprising 
policy thus inaugurated, has been consistently maintained to the 
present time, with the result that the Library has shown a gprowth 
in books, membership and efficiency seldom if ever equaled by a 
similar institution in the United States. 

In this period of five years, the books have increased from 
6356 to 42,313; the membership from 132 to 18,057. During the 
first month in the new quarters, the circulation of books was 4762; 
during the last month of this library year, the circulation was 40,- 
247. Thus it appears that, while the books have been increased 
nearly seven fold, the use made of the books has increased nearly 
ten fold. There could be no stronger attestation of the fact that 
the policy of advancement inaugurated five years ago has been 
thoroughly appreciated by the public, and the demands upon 
the Library have always kept ahead of the facilities offered. 

The number of books actually added to the Library during this 
period of five years, has been 36,132. An earnest effort has been 
made by each succeeding board to maintain the integrity of each 
classified department, and to this end, not only worn out books 
had to be purchased anew, but important publications had to be 
added from time to time. A part of the systematic plan was to 
center attention upon a new department each year, and build it 
tip while allowing none of those already established to lag behind. 

Of course, in the selection of more than 36,000 volumes, the 
book committee has been under a grave responsibility and we be- 
lieve their earnest endeavor has been to secure books that would 
be worthy a place on the Library shelves. They have endeavored 
at all times to provide a clean and wholesome class of literature 
for the public, and have sought to provide largely for instruction 
as well as for entertainment. In 1891, by the concurrence of the 
Board of Education and the sanction of the Council, the use of 
an additional room was secured in which the Reference Library 
was established. This has become an important feature of the in- 
stitution and has now an average daily attendance of 120. It is 
in effect a literary work room, and as such ranks as an important 
feature of the educational system of the city. 

In 1 89 1, following the example of the best libraries of the 
country, the public school library was incorporated into this in- 
stitution, and since that date books have been issued to the sev- 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 5 

eral schools under the supervision of the teachers. This feature 
has grown to such an extent during the ten months of the present 
school year, that the circulation of books among the pupils of the 
public schools has been 15,116. The agreement with the School 
Board of 1891-2 was, that the library fund of the public schools 
should be used each year for the purchase of books most avail- 
able for circulation in the schools through the medium of this 
Library, but we regret to state that this agreement on the part 
of the Board of Education has not been fulfilled during the past 
two years. 

A feature incorporated during this period has been the cir- 
culation of periodical literature. This has met with the most 
hearty appreciation from the beginning, and, we believe has been 
a potent factor in encouraging the reading of the best class of 
current literature. 

Another feature which has proved to be popular and useful, 
is the musical department of the Library. This has been utilized 
largely by students of music, and we believe, has been a means 
of education, and has helped to elevate the public taste in this 
art. 

Early in the administration of the Library, the Board 
of Directors adopted civil service rules for the appointment 
and regulation of the staff of attendants. The first appointments 
were made after a rigorous examination into the qualifications of 
applicants, ignoring altogether political influences, and all objects 
save the achievement of the greatest good for the Library itself. 
In line with this policy a training class was established in No- 
vember, 1 89 1, and from the graduates of this and succeeding 
classes, all appointments to the staff have since been made. Of 
the nineteen attendants now employed, fourteen have taken the 
regular course of training in these classes, five having been em- 
ployed before the establishment of this system. 

Appointments and promotions are all regulated according to 
efficiency and length of service. This plan, which originated in 
this Library, has elicited much attention from those interested in 
library work. It has operated most satisfactorily, and has had 
the result of eliminating politics and personal favoritism from the 
management of library affairs. As a part of this system it has 
always been recognized by this Board and its predecessors in office 



6 BBPOBT OF BOARD OF DIBECTOBS 

that the employees of this Library were entitled to retain their 
positions during good behavior, hence the formality of re-appoint- 
ment from year to year has not been recognized as necessary or 
advisable, the appointments holding good until cause is shown to 
the contrary, as indeed is the meaning and effect of the City 
Charter. 

At the beginning of the period under discussion, the Board 
was fortunate in securing as Librarian, Miss Tessa L. Kelso, 
who was endowed with the highest executive ability, who had 
made a study of advanced library methods, and who was eminently 
qualified to carry forward the work which has been outlined 
above. Her services in building up the Public Library of Los 
Angeles to its present commanding position cannot be overesti- 
mated. 

Miss Kelso's efforts have been ably seconded by Miss Adelaide 
R. Hasse, Assistant Librarian, who has developed a remarkable 
faculty for library work, and has proved to be most efficient and 
feithful. For three years the Library also benefitted by the 
services of Miss Lena B. Penner, who acted as Second Assistant 
Librarian, and who left the staff with the regrets of the Board. 

Miss Estelle Haines, Principal of the Reference Department^ 
has been on the staff since September, 1889, and is entitled to the 
highest commendation for faithful, earnest and effective work. 

We wish to commend the entire staff of employees for their 
faithful performance of duty, and their wilUngness at all times to 
subordinate their personal comfort and convenience to the good 
conduct of the Library. 

The Board has always endeavored to have the public served 
not only with diligence, but also with decorum, and we think 
that citizens of Los Angeles who have made use of the Library 
will bear us out in the assertion that our staff has been most ef- 
ficient and courteous. 

This Board urged last year the necessity for some action on 
the part of your Honorable Body in regard to issuing bonds for 
the purpose of building suitable quarters for the Library and a 
museum of Californian archaeology. The lot adjoining the City 
Hall is available for such a purpose, and we are confident that 
the public at large will heartily endorse a plan to provide more 
commodious quarters for the Library. We beg that this matter 



LCM3 ANGBLB8 FUBLIO UBRABT. 7 

have your immediate attention and that the question be settled 
by your Body, since this Board is held responsible for a condition 
of affidrs that is beyond its power to remedy. 

The Board regrets that your Honorable Body saw fit to re- 
duce the appropriation for the use of the Library for the current 
fiscal year. The full limit of five cents on each $iooof assessment 
would have netted the fund $23 ,703, and the cutting off of $4,702 
really cripples the institution, and certainly cannot be applied to 
any other fund where it is more needed. The necessities of the 
Library are immediate and extensive, and the Board, in calling 
attention to them is but the mouthpiece of 18,000 citizens who 
are daily subject to inconvenience due to lack of room and of 
sufficient employees. 

The number of volumes taken in and given out over the de- 
livery room desk in the current year was 901,620. Such a vol- 
ume of business calls for more adequate facilities for its trans- 
action. 

The salary expenditures of the Library have been kept down 
with much rigor in order to save money with which to buy books 
demanded by the public; the amount paid the members of the 
staff does not fittingly represent their worth, and is far below that 
paid by any similar institution in the country doing the same 
amount of business. The Library is entitled to firont rank among 
our educational institutions, and the necessary qualifications of 
employees is equal to that of public school teachers, but with the 
limited amount of money allowed us by your Honorable Body, 
it is impossible to properly maintain the efficiency of the insti- 
tution. « 

The Library has been a paying investment for the city, as a 
means of education and recreation to the citizens, and as an at- 
traction to the tourist population. It would be poor policy to 
permit the value of the investment to retrograde, yet this must 
happen if you fail to act promptly iq providing more suitable 
quarters and continue to reduce the yearly income for its support. 

Even if plans be adopted for a Library and Museum build- 
ing, additional quarters for our Reference Department are im- 
mediately imperative. This want could be temporarily met by 
giving us the rooms on the Library floor of the City Hall at pres- 
ent occupied by the Superintendent of Public Schools, which ad- 



8 



BEPOBT OF BOABD OF DmBOTOBS 



join our Reference Room, and which are unfitted for the purposes 
to which they are now dedicated, owing to the great concourse of 
people passing through the corridors to and from the Library. 

Pull details respecting the present status of the Library and 
its operation during the past year are given in the report of the 
Librarian herewith appended to which we hereby refer, the same 
being made a part of this report. 

Respectfully submitted. 

By order of the Board of Directors, 
Aittest: G. A. Dobinson, President* 

T. L. Kelso, Clerk. 
Los Angeles, Cal., December 15th, 1894. 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRABT. 



REPORT 



OK 



THE LIBRARIAN 



1893-94 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Library : 

Gentlxmbn: — 

I have the pleasure of herewith snibmittiiig to you my sixth annual 
report, a statement of the work of the Lihrary year from 1st December 
181)3. to Ist December, 1894. 

The City Council apportioned to the Library Fund for the current 
fiscal year, ending June 30, 1895, the sum of $19,001.05, being four and 
ooe-tenth cents on each one hundred dollars of the assessed value of 
all taxable property. 

The maximum limit fixed by the City Charter allows an apportion- 
ment for Library purposes of five cents on each one hundred ddlara of 
taxable property, which limit, if allowed, would have made the Library 
Fund amount to $23,703, this year. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Library Fund for the past year 
are as follows: 



w 



fi6,W><* 

pmd§or. «5 97 

fffc 

3t5» _ 

i/nS ID 

sold a»«o 

P.L 7 9S 

«.ia3 " 



fKX4S2 S> 



Books {4.63649 

Pferiodfcals i«M4 » 

i«iat to 

»^»3 49 

6 10 



Blaakfofins. $ «57 5t> 

Ajunalrcpoct loi 50 

Fictioo Hit 5*1 Stt 



8S0 so 
266 76 
28906 
a88 00 
10 00 
10 00 
138 00 



Pttiiiiunv aodfijLtiiics - 

Uaoltam, 3867 

Gas fiztnres 99 80 

Caipcotom^^ yS 12 

, . 144 59 

fsmtor 7800a 

nch^cf and Sondaj service 288 oo 

Salaries 10,233 *5 

Balance from 1892-93 244 69 

82 



BOOE& 

Number of volumes in the Library ist December, 1893 34,332 

Number of Government documents omitted in report 1892-^ 3,892 

Number of volumes added to xst December, 1894 6,353 

Xotal •>• ^A\ 777 

Worn out and discarded 1^085 

Lost and paid for ' 58 

^'' '~ 321 



Total 



1,464 



Total number of books in Library ist December, 1894. 42,31s 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



n 



CLASSIFIED CONTENTS OF CIBCULATING DEPARTMENT. 



CI^ASS. 


VOLS, 


CLASS. 


VOLS. 


Philosoohy 


561 
1.359 
1,411 

221 
1,227 

749 
710 

2.454 
1,686 

1.437 
1.817 


Fiction 


10,307 

3»397 
1,008 


Relifrion. 


Tu venile Fiction 


Sociolofirv 


Music 


PhilolofirT 


French 


664 


Natural Science 


German 


246 


Useful Arts 


Spanish 


267 


Fine Arts 


Italian 


2a7 


Literature 


Bound Periodicals 

Unbound Periodicals 

PlateSt etc 


741 


History 

Travels 


484 
551 


Bio^aphy 





CLASSIFIED CONTENTS OF REFERENCE DEPARTMENT. 



CLASS. 


VOLS. 


CLASS. 


VOLS. 


BiblicMjaphv and ) 

EncycTopsdias f 

Philosoohv 


674 

126 

229 

150 

284 


Bioerapby 


87 


Fiction 


3 

2 


German 

Spanish 


Relifirion 


24 


Natural Science 


Italian 


I 


Useful Arts 


U. S. Public Documents. 
Gal. State Documents . . . 

Maps and Atlases 

Bound Periodicals 


4.60s 


Fine Arts 

Literature 


233 
111 


Historv 


^i002 


I rsvciav ••••• •••• •••• 


^ 



The number of books addad during the past year was 6353 volumes,. 
the largest number of additions was in class 800 (Literature). New 
fiction numbered about 400 volumes, whUe 2000 worn-out books in 
fiction and Juvenile were replaced. Some 222 Tolum«s were added to 
Sociology, mostly the result of requests, and History and Travels had 
412 additions. 

The different departments of the United States Government have 
kept the Lfibrary supplied with their publicatioos as fast as available^ 
some 800 volumes having been received during the year. 

BOOK BORROWERS. 

The enrollment of members for the past year is 4709, of which 191& 
are men, and 2794 are women. The total active membership to date, 
Is 18,057. The registration has averaged 300 per month for the past 
five years. 

Four thousand two hundred and eight notices were mailed to Ikmv 
rowers whose securities had expired, and from the returns made 172^ 
cards have been renewed, 563 cards canceled, and 2400 changes in 
addresses discovered, and, while entailing considerable clerical labor, 
this method of notifying borrowers of their security expirations Is more 
satisfactory to the public than re»i*egistration, and at the same time 
tiie library purxK)se is served as well. 



12 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 

tst December iSju, io isi December 1S94, 



MONTH. 



December . 
January. . . . 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 
uly 

Au^st. ... 
September. 
October . . . 
November. 



Total. 



i 
t 

25 


BOMB 
USB. 


31 


LIBRARY 

USB. 


TOTAL. 


1 


Reference 

Room 

Use. 


24.448 


12.031 


36,479 


31 


3,343 


25 


25,39^ 


31 


11,734 


37.125 


^2 


3,227 


23 


24,955 


28 


10,759 


35.714 


28 


3,022 


27 


28,733 


31 


10.476 


39,209 


31 


3,458 


24 


24,490 


29 


8,813 


33,303 
37,388 


29 


2,843 


26 


27,713 


31 


9>675 


31 


3,636 


26 


27.723 


30 


9,408 


37,131 


30 


2,711 


25 


28,894 


31 


9,357 


38.251 


31 


2,147 


27 


29,151 


31 


9,478 


38,629 


31 


3,318 


25 


28,010 


30 


9,598 


37.608 


30 


3,m8 


26 


30,212 


31 


9,519 


39.731 


31 


3,820 


25 
304 


29.685 


30 

344 


10,562 


40,247 


30 
342 


3,598 


329.405 


121,410 


450,815 


38,271 



ORAMD 
TOTAL. 



39,822 
40,352 
38.736 
42,667 

36,146 
41.024 

39,842 
40,398 
41,947 
40,756 

43,551 
43,169 

489,086 



The Library was closed entirely on one day in the year, 10th April, 
the day of the ''Fiesta.'* 

The average daily issue of books for home use is 1360. 

One book is iaenied on a card at one time, ajid for every book that 
goes oat, either for home or Library use, one book must be returned to 
the shelves; thus the handling of books over the counter during the 
year amounted to 901,620 volumes. The limited space at command for 
such an amount of business is totally inadequate, and the delivery- 
room during the busy hourp presents a scene of crowding and diaoom- 
fort which seriously hinders satisf&ctoiy service on the part of the 
attendants. 

There is no other public institution in the City that has as many 
patrons as the Library, and there is no good reason why more suitable 
quarters should not be provided for the cimvenienoe «f the public; but 
nothing will be done until the citizens demand of the City Council 
that the Library quarters be extended. 

FITS TEARS' RECORD. 

1st December^ iSSfy, to ist December^ 1894, 



YEAR. 


HoMB UsB OF Books. 


Rbading Room 
USB OP books. 


No. Mbmbbrs 
Addbd. 


1880-00 


47.172 
116,263 

233,363 
267,054 
329,401 


72,661 

87.804 

92.73^ 
120,205 

121,410 


1,141 
4.988 

4.735 
4,122 

4.709 


**'*T Zn'* •••••••••• 

1800-01 


1891-92 

1802-0^ 


*vr^« 3,0 •••••••♦.•• 

1893-94 


Total 


993.253 


494.816 


19,695 





IX)S ANGELES PX7BLI0 LIBBABT. 



13 



The above table does not include any fi^rures from tbe Reference 
Department or the Newspaper Room, but represents only books giveo 
oat upon slips. The work of the first eight months of 1888 are not 
giyen in the table. 

Tbe fignies since my appointment, 1st April, 1889, to date» are: one 
million books issued for use at home, over one half-million in the 
Reading Rooms, and twenty-five thousand persons registered 



Although the business has inoreeBed to this extent, not an inch of 
space has been added for the convenience of the public, and the quar- 
ters were thought too small five years ago! 

DISTRIBUTION OF BOOKS THROUGH THE SCHOOLS. 

The system of distribution of books through tbe schools has been 
eacplained at length in previous reports, and the success of the plan haa 
been established beyond doubt. The teachers have shown an increased 
interest during the past year, and on Saturday mornings they come to 
the Library in such numbers to s^ect thefer books that three attendants 
have been detailed to assist them. 

Number of School Houses 35 

" *• " Rooms 254 

«' Pupils 9820 

" •' Teachers 254 

*' " " drawing books from Library 

1st Dec., 1893 137 

" " ** drawing books from Library 

ist Dec., 1894 145 

The statistics of distribution for the year are as follows : 



December . 
January.... 
February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Strptember. 
October . . . 
November. 



MONTHS. 



Total. 



No. of 
DeliTcr- 


No. of 


iet. 


Rooms. 


3 


48 




55 




45 




44 




19 


4 


40 




12 




f. 




30 


33 


413 



Na of 
Vols. De- 
livered. 



1.505 
1,676 

1,818 

1.863 

895 

1,584 

189 

776 

2,476 
2.334 



I5."6 



14 



REPOBT OF BOABD OF DIBBCRTQBS 



CLASSIFiCATIOH OF CIRCULATION OF BOOKS. 



CLASSIFICATION. 



Philosophy 

Relig^ion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science. . . 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Biography 

Fiction 

Fiction, Juvenile. . 
Current Magazines 
Bound Magazines. 

Music 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

plates, Pictures... 



Total 329f 405 






2,273 
3,218 

3»204 

349 

4,674 

2,110 

2,707 
8,151 
5,721 

8.598 
6,117 

193,717 
37,702 

28,109 

10.475 

3,797 

3,353 
1,692 

201 

1,349 
1.779 



S 

D 

e 

3 



1,822 

2,154 
2,095 

834 
2,924 

2,229 

2,337 
3,754 
2,562 
2,966 
2,828 

10,396 
8,450 

67,393 

5,007 

981 



I 



160 
726 



121,410 



4,095 
5,372 

5,299 
1,183 
7,598 
4,339 
6,044 
11,905 
9,283 

",564 

8,945 

204,113 

46,152 

95,502 

15,482 

4,688 

4,254 

2,583 
361 

2,075 

1,779 



450,815 



& 



1 



561 

1,359 

1,411 

221 

1,227 

740 

710 

2,454 
1,686 

1,437 

1,817 

10,307 

3,397 
•484 

741 
z,oo8 

664 
246 
227 
267 

551 



32,166 



No. Times each Book 
has Circulated. 



« 

E 

o 

X 



4K 
2^ 

2X 

4 
3 

4 

6 

3^ 

19 
II 

167 
14 
3>^ 
5 
6« 






^5 



3V 
l)i 
i>i 

4 

I 
"3 

I 

3K 

3^ 



I 



7H 

4 

6 

S 
8 

20 

13J« 
380 

21 

4io 
6 
10 

4 

3X 






•95 

I 

I 

.2 

1.6 

.97 

I 

2.6 

.6 
2.5 

.5 

40.5 
10 

20 

3 
I 

I 

5 
.08 

•4 
.3 



*i68 for home use ; 316 for library use. 

Clafls Fine Arts has always been credited with the circuUitioii of 
plates and pictuB:^e0; but this year a separate count was made of them. 

Fiction shows an increefle, due to the publication of the Fiction Listw 
There are 10,000 volumes in the Library in classes other than Fiction 
which are not listed, or printed, and which are consequently unknown 
except through the medium of the shelf -sheets. 

Music has an Increcised circulation to its credit, and is a particularly 
satisfiactoiy feature with the book boiTowers. The demand for many 
of the pc^ular operas was so great that several duplicate copies of 
them had to be purchased in order to meet it. 

The increased use of Class 300, Sociology, reflects the popular Interart; 
In the Tariff, the Silver question, the Single tax, etc 

A large proportion of the circulation credited to Class 200, Rellgioii, 
Is due to the popularity of a haif-doKcn writers, viz: Spurgecm, Totten, 
Blavatsky. IngersoU, Savage, and Phillips Brooks. 

On March 12, the new charging system went into effect, each book 
being pctyvided with a card which remains in the book when in the 



LOS AN0ELB8 PUBUC LIBRAJtT. 



15 



library, and wben *'o«it," the card ia In the slip-case. The cards bear 
the number of every borrower who has read the book to which the card 
belongs, and the charges indicate the sex of the reader and the date of 
the iesue of the book. These book-cards have room for 35 issue 
charges, and the 460 cards which have been filled to Deo. 1st, furnish 
a very interesting index to the books most widely read in this city. 

Charles King's books head the list with 26 cards, 5 being for "Two 
Soldiers," 4 each for *'Foes in Ambush," aind ^'Starlight Ranch," and 3 
for "Between the Lines," the remaining 10 being scattered. 

Rose Noucbette Carey comes next with 25 cardla, and of her books 
which have the largest representation, "Litdei Miss Muffet" leads with 
5 cards, followed by "AveriU," with 4 cards. 

Clara Louise Bumham has 22 cards, 6 of which represent "Dr. 
Latimer," this book having the largest number of issues of any in the 
Library during that time. Next in circulation to "Dr. Latimer," is 
"Next Door," with 5 cflrd& There are nine copies of each of these 
books, and 8 copies each of the King and Carey books. King is a very 
popular author with boys and young men, the love story being subor- 
dinated to the action. Miss Carey is the favorite with girls, both 
authors occupying the intermediate ground between Juvenile and adult 
fiction. 

Certain books of an author have a much greater vogue than others, 
and a list of the titles of books is worth consideration. 



AUTHOR. 



Behrens. . . 
Behrens. . . 
Clemens. . . 

Gunter 

Gunter . . . . 

Barr 

Crawford.. 
Dumas. ... 
Grand. ...< 

Grand 

Marryat, F 
Burnett . . . . 
Burnett.... 

Doyle 

Doyle 

Haggard.. 
Stannard.. 

Bayley 

Forrester.. 

Barrie 

aifford.... 
Hector..... 



NO. 
CARDe 

FILLED. 



17 
13 
13 
13 

8 
8 
8 
8 

8 
7 



7 

7 
6 

6 

5 
5 

5 



TXTLB OF BOOK MOST RBAD. 



Lora , 

Penniless Girl 

f 1,000,000 Bank Note 
liss Dividends , 

Mr. Potter of Texas 

Rose of a Hundred Leaves. 

Don Orstno 

Count of Monte Cristo, v. i 

Singularly Deluded 

Heavenly Twins 

Harvest of Wild Oats 

Fair Barbarian 

Louisiana 

Firm of Girdlestone 

The Great Shadow 

Maiwa*s Revenge 

Dinna FoTaet 

Won by ^A^iting 

I Have Lived and Loved. . . 

Little Minister 

Aunt Anne 

Maid, Wife or Widow? 



. . . . 



NO. 
CARDS 
PILLBD. 



4 
4 

4 
3 

3 

2 

2 
2 

4 

2 

2 

4 

2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

3 

2 

2 
2 
2 



In addition to those authors having 5 cards to their credit, there are 
many others who have from 1 to 5 cards, and among these the stan- 



16 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRBOTORS 



aard authcn are very fairiy represented by Bladic's ''That Beautiful 
Wretch" and 'The Handsome Humes;** Charlotte Bronte's "Tenant itt 
WildfeU Hall;'* Bulwer's ''Alice;'* OoUin's Queen of Hearts;" R. H. 
Davis' "Gallefirher" and "Van Bibber;" Du Ghaillu's "Ivan the Viking;** 
Eckstein's "Chaildeaii Magician;" Fooite*s "La^t Assembly Ball;" 
Harte^s "Two Men of Sandy Bar" and "Mrs. Skagg's Husband;" 
Howell's "CkMurt of Bohemia" and "Their Wedding Journey;" Hugo<*8 
"Lee Mlserables;" James' "Daisy Miller;" Kipling's "Many Inyentioos" 
and "Dinah Shadd;" MacDonaid's "Heather and Snow;" Beadei's "Hard 
Gash" and "Peg Wofflngton." 

In most cases the author's best known book does not appear to be 
tiie popxilar choice. In general, these books indicate tbei p<^>ular 
demand, and a study of the whoile list of 450 shows that the title of a 
book greatly influences its demand. A book with a sentimental title 
in any one author's list of novels will be the one most read, regardless 
of the fame of some other noveH. Thomas Hardy affords an illustra^ 
tion of this statement "A Pair of Blue £^es" and "Far from the 
Madding Growd," being called for oftener than his more famous '*Tes8 
of the D'Urbervillea" 

In purchasing fiction the policy has been rather to duplicate the wortcs 
of standard and well-known authors than to furnish a great 
variety of unknown book& As the fiction list does not show the num- 
ber of copies of a book, an indication is here given of the average 
extent of duplication of the books of popular authors: 



AUTHOR. 



Alcott 

Besant 

Black 

Blackmore 
Bulwer.... 
Bumham . . 

Carey 

Cooper. . . . 
Crawford . . 
Dickens... . 

Dumas 

Ebers — 
Eliot 



No. of 


No. 


Total 


Books 


Times 
Dupli- 
cated 


No. of 
Vols. 


24 


15 


360 


34 


4 


136 


29 


4 


116 


13 


4 


52 


24 


6 


144 


8 


5 


40 


19 


6 


114 


33 


3 


99 


23 


i 


"5 


30 


160 


20 


7 


140 


14 


6 


84 


10 


6 


60 



AUTHOR 



Hardy 

Harte 

Hawthorne. . . . 

Henty 

Howells 

Hugo 

James 

King 

MacDonald.... 

Meredith 

Scott 

Thackeray 

Trollope 



No. of 


No. 




Times 


Books 


Dnpli- 




cated 


15 


4 


35 


5 


15 


5 


48 


6 


23 


5 


7 


13 


33 


3 


30 


4 


36 


3 


14 


fl 


29 


6 


II 


10 


48 


3 



Total 

No.o< 

Vols. 



60 

105 

60 

368 

"5 

91 
66 

80 

78 
28 

174 
no 

96 



The novels most extensively duplicated are Ramona, 27 copies, Loma 
DoonOp and Monte Cristo, 25 cofMes each, and Vanity Fair, 20 copies. 

PERIODICALS. 

There are 484 periodicals regularly received and on file In the 
lAbrary, including dailies» weeklies, monthlies^ etc. 



LOS ANGBLB8 PUBUC UBBABT. 



17 



On file in the Reading Room 116 

On file at the periodical deek 200 

For use at home, (duplicateB) 168 

T&bal 484 

On File In the Beading Booms. 

The 116 periodicals &o filed include dally newBpaiperSy both local and 
foreign, and a large number of local and out-of-town weeklies received 
by courtesy. The newspapers are filed on stationary racks in the 
room provided for that purpose, and the weeklies ara backed on sticks 
and hung against the walls, some in the general reading room, and 
some in the ladies* reading room. The local press in every case 
accommodates the library with three copies of its issues, of which two 
aire placed in the general and ladies' reading rooms, respectively, the 
remaining copy being reserved for binding. Of the number of times 
these periodicftls are read no count is kept, nor does their use figure in 
the record of periodical statifirtios. 

On File at the Periodical Desk. 

Of the 200 periodicals on file here, 42 have been so recently received 
that their use does not figure in the following tables. The reoord of 
circulation of these periodicals is kept by requiring each reader to 
sign a blanlc, and by stamping the date of loan on a sheet pasted to 
the insi^ of the back covers of the periodicals. 

The following table shows the number of times magazines, whose 
circolation during the year exceeded 500, have been issued: 



WEEKLIES . 



Figaro Illustre 

Electrical World 

Harper's Bazar 

Uber Land und Meer 

Youth's Companion 

Argonaut 

Punch 

Queen 

Harper's Youn|: People (2 c.) 
Scientific American Supplem't 

Pall Mall Budget 

Illostrated American 

Harper's Weekly 

Frank Leslie's Weekly 

Life 

London Graphic 

London News 

Scientific American (a c.) . . . 



NO. 

TIMSS 
ISSL'KD. 



524 

595 

604 

627 
672 

749 
739 
919 

966 

1059 

1359 
1516 

1646 

1778 
1962 
2297 

2473 
2583 



MONTHLIES. 



Army and Navy Toumal 

Popular Science Monthly. . . 

Overland 

Short Stories 

Demorest 

Atlantic 

Outing 

Delineator 

Rural Califomian 

Catholic World 

Season 

Lippincott 

Ladies' Home Journal 

St. Nicholas (2 c.) 

Forum (2 c.) 

Review of Reviews (N. Y.) . 
North American Review. . . 

Arena 

Cosmopolitan 2 c.) 

Scribner (2 c.) 

Century (2 c.) 

Harper (2 c). 



NO. 
TIMBS 
ISSUED. 



524 
596 
620 

696 

735 
738 
848 
856 

943 

977 
991 

992 

1043 
1096 

1209 

1214 

1252 

137 » 
1556 
2548 
3052 
3173 



18 



BSPOBT OF BOABD OF DIBB0T0B8 



PERIODICALS FOR HOME USE. 



PERIODICALS. 



Arena 

Atlantic 

Century 

Child Garden 

Cosmopolitan 

Critic 

Current Literature. 

Eclectic 

Forum 

Harper's Magazine 

Harper's Younjc People. . . 

Illustrated American 

Kindertrarten. . 



h 

S56 



7 
5 

26 

2 

9 
I 

2 

5 
8 

26 

lo 

2 
I 



oPQ 
55 



6 
3 

lO 

2 

7 
I 

2 
2 

3 
lo 

II 

2 
I 



PERIODICALS. 



Lippincott 

Nation 

New England Magazine . 

Nineteenth Century 

North American Review. 

Outing 

Overland 

Pop. Science Monthly. . . . 

Review of Reviews 

St. Nicholas 

Scribner 

Youth's Companion 



S50 



4 
I 

I 

I 

8 

3 

2 

5 
5 
9 

20 

5 



« . 

§■■§ 

52 



4 
I 

I 

I 

4 
3 

2 

2 

2 

II 

7 
6 



During the past year 5 copies of Harper's Ma^razine and the Ccmtury, 
3 of the Forum, 3 of the Scribner's, and 3 of the Review of Revieiws 
were added to the licrt of periodicals for use at home. 

The four-day limit makes it possible for the current numbers of a 
magazine to circulate seven times in one month, and the demand for 
back numbers at a seven-day limit keeips the full stock in canfitant 
circulation until they axe bound at the end of four montha Period- 
icals for home use are bound in three volumes per year, making a more 
convenient slzew 

The copies that are not needed for binding are filed away, some to 
replace worn-out circulating copies, while others are taken apart, the 
illustrations cut out, sorted, and mounted on gray brlstol board, 
forming invaluable collections of pictures for teaching geogiraphy, 
history, literature, and mythology, besides being samples of the modem 
school of illustrators and artists. 

The articles aire sorted into dajsslfied groups which are sewfd 
together, some for school, some for library use, some for the hospitals, 
etc. The comic pictures and adveo'tisement pages are sent to the 
Social Settlements, and to Kindergartens for scrap books. For all- 
around usefulness, attractivenass, and satisfaction, the magazines 
which are duplicated for home use are unsurpassed. There is no 
trouble in securing volunteers for the cutting of pictures, for coHectore 
of like material will gladly exchange work for plcturea The report 
of the teachers on the use of this material in the school room is a 
general cry for more. 

In addition to duplicate copies taken expressly for home use, back 
numbers of any periodical may be taken out. Back numbers of the 
literary magazines have been extensively used by the High and Normal 
school classes, serving as an atljunct to the study of modem literaturec 

The constant call made f^ magazines has necessitated an elaborate 



LOS ANGELBS PUBLIC LIBBABY. 19 

fiystem of filing, in order that each number may be as readily accessi- 
ble afi any book. The wear and tear and replacing of these magazines, 
most of which are ultimately bound for the Reference Room, has not 
cost five doilars, and the public has had constant access to the best 
periodicals for home reading. 

REFERENCE ROOM. 

The Reference Department is open every day in the year the same 
number of hours as the Circulating Department There are 
10,147 volumes in this room, and 38,271 students have been accommo- 
dated during the year. With the exception; of a few expensive art 
editions, every book and bound periodical stands upon open shelves, 
and the satisfaction which this arrangement affords the student and 
busy man or woman more than compemsateB for the few losses which 
have occurred dliring the year. The method of work with the students 
is as far as practicable upon the seminary plan, an especial effort 
being made to induce principals of schools, leaders of societies and 
clubs to file with the Principal of this Department their outlines 
of studies. Books referred to in their curriculum which can be spared 
from the ciixrulatlng department are reserved, and lists prepared of 
all material in the Library, duplicate copies of which are supplied to 
the leaders of the classes, or posted in the schoolrooms. 

Through this method the High and Normal Schools, the Ruskin Art 
Club, and many others have made the Library their headquarters for 
systematic study. 

The usefulness of this department is greatly retarded, and the num- 
ber of readers lessened on account of its cramped condition. 

In the case of the schools the expedient has been satisfactorily 
adopted of sending to the more advanced classes a collection of 50 or 
100 books on a given subject being studied at the time, as, for instance^ 
the Victorian period of Engiish literature, a certain period of American 
history, Rome in the time of the Caesars, etc. These special class 
loans to the higher grades are separate from the regular school 
deliveriea 

Bibliographies are prepared of current topics and are posted on the 
bulletin board in the circulating department, thus calling the attention 
of the general public to the resources of the Library on these subjects 
Special emphasis is laid upon the oodlectlon of literature bearing on 
the observance of holidays, which is i^eserved for the use of teachera 
and pupils; and such material once collected is carefully preserved and 
added to from time to time. 

An index to bibliographtles which wa« begun during the year has 
been found very useful in furnishing informatioa on current topics. 

During the summer, when the room is least used, it was the custom to 
place upon one of the long tables a quantity of books "for inspection." 
It was often necessary that the one attendant in the room was absent 
for five or ten minutes at a time, while selecting books in the circulat- 



20 



REPORT OF BOARD OT DIRECTORS 



ing department, and daring these times the Reference Boom remained 
unprotected. When it came time to return these books to the sbelvea 
many of them were mlBsing. Upon invefttigation, it was found tiiat 
they were all taken by one man while the room was left unguardetd. 
The majority of the books have been recovered in a more or less 
mutilated condition. Froim that time an extra attendant haB been 
placed on duty in the Reference Room whose especial care it is to 
check the shelves periodically and to check books borrowed from the 
circulating department for use in the Reference Room. 

BEADING B00H8. 

The general reading room of the Library Is supplied with representa- 
tive newspapers of the largest cities in the country, and although the 
papers are from three to six days old when they reach Los Ang^es^ 
they are in such demand that the rule permitting one person to retain 
a paper but 15 minutee has to be strictly enforced. Some 21 dailies 
and 52 weeklies can be used without making out a slip, and 200 are on 
file in the room that are subject to such formality. 

The ayerage daily attendance of readers in the general reading room 
is 250, and between 6:80 and 9:30 P. M., its full seating capacity is 
taxed. 

The woman's reading room is supplied with 5 dailies and 10 week- 
lies, and has an average daily attendance of 150. The evening attend- 
ance falls much bedow the day attendance. * 

SUNDAT AND HOLIDAY OPENING. 

The Library is open from 1 P. M. to 9 P. M. on Sundays and on New 
Year's Day, Washington's Birthday, Decoration day, Fourth of July, 
Admission Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. No books are 
issued for home use on these days, but the Reference^ Room, and Read- 
ing Rooms are open, and any book from the dreulating department 
can be used on the premises. The expense per Sunday or holiday is 
$4.80. The attendance was as follows: 



MONTH 



December 
January. . . 
February. . 
March . . . . 
April ... . 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 



Sun- 
days. 

5 


Readers 




1282 


4 


1227 




4 
4 
5 
4 


»259 

1023 
1 100 
106 r 




4 
5 
4 


1127 
1066 
1060 




5 


1341 





MONTH 



October 

November 

New Year's Day 

Washington's Birthday 

Decoration Day 

Fourth of July 

Admission Day. 

Thanksgiving Day. . . 
Christmas 




The average Reference Room attendance Is 120. 



LOB ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRABY. 21 

CATALOeiNe BEPABTMENT. 

On the Ist March last, all regular cataloging work was suspeBided, 
the pressure of the daily routine business demanding the entire time 
of all the membera of the staff. The lack of catalogs, or indexes is a 
very serious drawback, and work in this de];>artment should be resumed 
at onoe. 

WORK BOOH. 

The gi«ater part of the mechanical and routine work of 
pi^paring books for the shelves, mending books, etc., goes on in this 
room, the work being done by the attendants when relieved from desk 

duty. 

There were 23,371 books brought in from the circulating department 
for repairs, relabeling, etc.; 6353 new boolss were checked from bill<<, 
acoessioned, dasEdfied, labeled, and shelf listed. 21,000 periodicals 
were received, checked, and placed in covers and put on file, and 233 
donations received, acknowledged, and entered. The writing of sbedf- 
sheets, notices, special lists, etc., keeps four type-writers in constant 



The extensive circulati<Mi of periodicals needs a very large st)ock of 
magazine covers, and these are made by the staff from linen duck, and 
are neat and well adapted for the purpose. Two hundred and thirty- 
one covers were made, costing 10 cents each, including labor. 

BINDIlfG AND BEPAIB8. 

No books were sent to the bindery during the first four months of 
the year for lack of funds^ and during the balance of the year only 
those books most in demand were sent to the bindery. They niun- 
bered 2727 volumes, and cost $963.20 to rebind. 23,371 books were 
repaired and mended in the work-room by the regular staff, ^niere 
are still many volumes of periodicals for the Reference Room that 
remain unbound, and every time these are called for a trip must be 
made to the attic, causing much delay and trouble. 

LIBBABT STAFF. 

There have been two reaignationB from the staff of employees during 
the year, one matrimonial, and the other in order to accept the position 
of librarian in a neighboring town. There have been six appoint- 
ments to the staff, and thirteen promotions^ all according to civil 
service rule. r 

The staff now numbers 22 persons: Librarian, Assistant LibrariaAi, 
Principal Reference Department, 13 regular attendants, one night and 
half-day attendant, and 5 night attendants. 

Day attendants are on dtity every day from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M., and 
one week in 6 they serve from 5 to 6 P. M., and one week in every 12, 
from 6 to 9:30 P. M. Thus the night f<»ce is always augmented by 



22 BEPOBT Ot BOARD OP HlBBGtOBS 

one day attendant from 6 to 9:30 P. M., and with two from 5 to 6 P. M. 
To every member of the staff Is assigned the care of some class of 
books In the droulating department who Is responsible for its order 
on the shelves and condition for use. 

Bales Ck^veming Employment, Rating, and Promotion of Attendants. 

EMPLOYMENT. 

The regular staff of the Library is divided into night attendants, 
and day and night and half-day attendants, the former serving eight 
hours daily, viz: from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M., and the latter four and one- 
half half hours daily, viz: from 5 to 9:30 P. M. 

In no case is employment in the Library given except to graduates 
of the Training Olafises, and to these according to ability as per the 
percentages obtained in the final ezaminatioins. 

All appointments to regular service are first for night duty, then for 
night and l\alf-day duty, and lastly for full day duty. 

Every regular attendant whose salary does not exceed that of the 
sixth class and every training class graduate is eligible for Sunday 
and holiday duty. 

RATING. 

;V11 attendants, whether employed on regular duty, half or full day 
time, are classified and promoted acoordlng to ability, and the salaries 
paid are according to the following schedule: 

ist class Ten dollars per month. 

and class Fifteen dollars per month. 

3rd class . . .Twenty dollars per month. 

4th class Twenty- five dollars per month. 

5th class Thirty dollars per month. 

6th class Thirty-five dollars per month. 

7th class Forty dollars per month. 

8th class Forty-five dollars per month. 

9th class Fifty dollars per month. 

Attendants doing night duty, or serving on half-time, or less, are in 
no case rated higher than third class. 

Haines, Estbllb. 

(Principal of Reference Department) employed since September, 1S89. Duties: Financial 
bookkeeper, minute clerk, and care of supply stock book. 

Glbason, Celia. 

Employed December, 1889. Duties: Bindery and mail work, also serves three hours 
daily at delivery desk. Salary, 9th class. 

Russ, N. M. 

Employed February, 1890. Duties : Enters in and revises shelf-sheets, assists with work 
on public documents, typewriting, also serves four hours daily at delivery desk. Salary 
9th class. 

Fargo, Elizabeth. 

Employed November, 1S90. Duties: Keeps all statistical circulation records of school 
and loan departments, all records of fines, delinquents, etc., has charge of work with 
teachers, also serves two hours daily at delivery desk. Salary, 8th class. 



LOS ANGELSS f UBUO UBRART. 23 

Merger, Harriet. 

Graduate first coarse, first training class. Employed May, 1892. Duties: Has geaeral 
charge of work room; accession clerk; files letters and bills; submits monthly report oi 
books added, mended, lost, discarded, also serves four hours daily at delivery desk. Salary 1 
7th class. 

Austin, Anna D. 

Graduate first course, second training class. Employed August, 189a. Duties: Type- 
writes catalog and bulletin cards of all additions, also serves four hours daily at delivery 
desk. Salary, 7th class. 

Thornburg, Florence. 

Graduateof first course, second training class. Employed August, 1S9S, Duties: Has 
charge of registry and periodical desk; keeps borrowers' and guarantors' indexes. Salary, 
6th class. 

KiNGSLEY, Leila. 

Graduate of first course, first training class. Employed. May, 1899. Duties: Assists in 
school work, has charge of " reserved books," checks and counts circulating books used 
in Reference Room, keeps borrowers' number index up to date by inserting additions and 
canceling withdrawals, also serves four hours daily at delivery desk. Salary, 6th class. 

Miller, Nora. 

Graduate first course, second training class. Employed, August, 189a. Duties: Assists at 
registry desk, in work room, and with bindery work, typewrites special lists and lists of 
new books, also serves four hours daily at deMvery desk. Salary, 5th class. 

Pierce, Bertha. 

Graduate first course, first training class. Employed. May, 189a. Duties: Piles and in- 
dexes school, society, and library reports, and second-hand book lists, indexes letter book, 
assists in work room, and catalogs on typewriter, also serves four hours daily at delivery 
desk. Salary, 5th class. 

DARLdw, Gertrude. 

Graduate first and second course, fourth training class. Employed, October, 1893. Duties: 
Files newspapers, cuts, stamps, and labels current magazines, and files back numbers; 
makes magazine covers, also serves four hours daily at delivery desk. Salary, 5th class. 

Johnson, Mary. 

Graduate first and second course, fourth training class. Employed March, 1894. Duties: 
Assists in work room, mending old books, and collating, labeling, pocketing, carding new 
books, also serves four hours daily at delivery desk. Salary, 5th class. 

Beckley, Anna. 

Graduate first course, thfard training class. Employed August, 1893. Duties: Assists in 
work room and typewrites, also serves four hours daily at delivery desk . Salary, 4th class. 

Dunn, Mabel. 

Graduate first course, fourth training class. Employed November, 1893. Duties: Assists 
in work room, also serves four hours daily at delivery desk. Salary, 4th class. 

Wise, Corinne. 

Head of night force. Employed, June, 1891. Duties: Serves four and one-half hours al 
delivery desk, receiving window ; also checks reading room slips, closes Library. Salary, 
4th class. 

Tedpord, Mattie. 

Employed September, 1891 ; night attendant. Duties: In charge registry and periodical 
desk. Salary, 3rd class. 

Putnam, Blanche. 

Graduate of first and second course, fourth training class. Employed, July, 1893. Serves 
I to 4 P. M., and 5 to 9:30 P. M. Duties: Assists in work room, typewriting, 
arranges charging slips for trays, also serves four and one-half hours daily at delivery 
desk. Salary, 4th class. 

Moore, Edith. 

Graduate first course, fourth training dan. Employed September, 1894, Duties: Serves 
four and one-half hours at delivery desk, from 5 to 9:30 P. M. Salary, 3rd class. 



24 RBPORT OF BOARD OF DIBEOTOttS 

Glsason, Pearl. 

Graduate first conrse, fifth training' class. Employed September, 1894, nig^ht attendant. 
Duties: Serves four and one-half hours at delivery desk, from 5 to 9:30 P. M. Salary: 
3rd class. 

Earl, Anna. 

Graduate first course, fifth training^ class. Employed December, 1894. Duties: Serves 
four and one-half hours at delivery desk, from 5 toprjp P. M. Salary, 3d class. 



yyyyyyy>>?- 

fKKSSXXKXK 




; X : ,- 1 GLKASON. II 


- : X 3 r 


KUSS. 


- x; ; 


MERCKB. 


X - ; 


VAKCO 


M- '. • 


KINGSLEV. 


- ■ X 


PIERCR. 1 


°i__i'^= 


THORN BURG. I 




BBCKl-BV. 




DARLOW. 


^H-'— 


PUTNAM. 


: «: J : 


JOHNSON. 


Darlow Dunn, Beckley Austin 
Uercer Dunn, Beckley Austin 
Gleason Fai^o, Miller Russ 
Gleason Fai^. Darlow Russ 
Austin Kingsley, Johnson Mercer 
Austin Kingsley, Fargo, Miller Mercer 
Gleason Johnson Putnam, Dunn, Pierce Darlow 
Uercer Miller, Johnson, Dunn, Putnam Darlow 
Wise Moore, Gleason, Earl Tedford 
Wise Putnam, Gleason, Earl Tedford 




Haines, Pierce Thoroburg 
Haines, Pierce Tbomburg 

Haines. Pierce '" ' 

Pierce 

Haines, Beckley Dark>w, MOler, Earl 
Haines, Beckley Darlow, MHler, Earl 
Haines. Beckley iDomDurg Darlow, Miller, Eaii 

Russ rhomburg Beckley. Horgan, F 
Austin Moora Beckley, Horgan, F 





m 

iM IS 



■ O 

I > 

M OD O 

lis? 



« 2 O 

DO 

s w 

2 "J 



•riff 



26 



ttEPOBT? OF BOARt) OB^ DIREOtORS 



TRAINING CLASSES. 

At the regulaiT meeting of the Board of Direotore in November 1891 
it was resolved that persons desirous of becoming efficient in library 
work should have ma4e available to them the training that may be 
obtained in this Library, and, for the better aclvantages of flUing 
vacancies which may occur on the staff, it was resolved that there 
should be taken into the Library six pupils to be sedected from ap- 
plicants by the Committee on Attendants. 

Applicants were to be young women not midjeor 17 years of age; and 
they were to agree to give three hours, service a day for a period of 
at least six montha At the end of that time, upon passing an ex- 
amination satisfactorily to the Board, they were to be placed upon 
the substitute list for further employment, as opportunity offered. 

Under the rules adopted by the Board governing the examinatioos, 
a rating of 70 per cent, on the maximum of 500 creditBi must be 
obtained by a pupil desiring a certiflcaite^ and to each applicant who 
exceeds that amount a certificate \b issued. 

The names of all certificated pupils are placed on the library books 
as eligible for substitute duty, and for regular employment in case 
of vacancies occurring. Furthermore, a percentage of 85 or more of 
the maximum of 500 credits entitles the holder of the marking to half- 
day service at the rate of ten dollars per month for six months, pro- 
vided the holder takes the second course of six months instruction in 
cataloging. 

The number of classes which have been inaugurated, and the number 
of applicants accepted and certificated since the beginning of the 
training class system in this Library, are shown in the following table: 



CLASSES 


CLASS BEGAN 


No Candidates 

for Entrance 

Examination. 


No 
Candidates 
Accepted 


No. Candidates 

for Final 
Examination. 


No. 

Certificates 

Issued . 


No. Certificated 
pupils employ'd 
in the Library. 


FIRST COURSS. 

ist. Class 


November, 1891 
February, 1893 
June, 189a 
January, 1893 
August. 1893 
September, 1894 


so 

>3 
II 

18 

la 


6 
6 
6 

8 

1 


6 
6 

ClLs 


3 
3 

. 3 
m pro 


3 


and. " 


3rd. •» ;: 


3 


4th. " 


5 

3 


5th. " ..; :::::::::::::: 


6th. •' 




Jfress. 




Total 


89 


37 


a6 


«9 


»5 






SECOND COURSX. 

ist. Class 


January, 1893 
July, 1893 


* 

I 
4 


I 

4 


I 
4 


4 




and. " 


3 






Tbtal 


5 


5 


S 


4 


3 







Los AKaSLSS PX7BLIG LIBRABT. 27 



SUNDAY AND HOLIDAY DUTY. 

All senice rendered by the attendants employed on Sundays and 
other holidays is paid for at the rate of twenty cents an hour for each 
hour of actual seryice, in addition to their regular salary. The holi- 
days to which this provision applies aire as follows: All Sundays, New 
Year's Day, Washington's Birthday, Decoration Day, Fourth of July, 
Admission Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. On these 
days the Library is kept open from 1 to 9 P. M. only, and no books ai^ 
issued for home use. After one year's service each attendant is 
allowed two weeks vacation with pay during the summer montha 

SUBSTITUTES. 

Ail first course graduates of the Training Classes not already 
employed for full day service, are divided into three classes according 
to their percentages obtained in the final examinations of that course; 
the first dasB including percentages 70 to 80; the second class percn^t- 
ages from 80 to 90; and the third class percentages from 90 to lOO.The 
graduates so classified aire eligible to act as substitutes as follows: 

First class pupils substitute for attendants of first to fifth class, 
inclusive. 

Second class pupils substitute for attendants of sixth and seventh 
classes, inclusive. 

Third class pupils substitute for attendants of eighth and ninth 
olasses^ indusive. 

In ail cases the substitute receives a per diem equal to the pay of the 
attendant whose place she fills, excepting when a substitute is called 
upon to fill the plaoe of an attendant of a higher claes than that for 
which she is entitled to substitute!, amd in that she receives the highest 
pay of the class to which she belongs. 

SOUTHERN CALIFOBNU LIBRABT CLUB. 

A number of very profitable meetings were held during the year in 
the Women's Reading Room of the Library, and were largely attended 
by members and the general public. The first and second meetings 
were devoted to the subject, "Realism in Fiction," which was consid- 
ered from the artistic standpoint, as weU as the practical libraiT one. 
A number of exceUent papers were read, and much interesting discus- 
sion was brought out The topic for the third meeting was "Book- 
binding as an Art." Samples of handsome binding were exhibited, 
and the entire process of hand-work was shown. At the fourth meeting,' 
"Gouin's Method of Teaching Languages" was presented with illustra- 
tion. Librarians of the neighboring towns find it very diflicult to 
attend meetings of the club montiily, and it was proposed to hold ail- 
day sessions once or twice a year devoted entirely to library matters, 
the dub continuing its more general work with teachers and that pop- 
tion of the pubhc interested in such questiona 



28 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

IN GENERiX. 

CHARGING SYSTEM. 

An important cbange wos made In the chairging system of the 
Library in March of thle year. Books used to be charged on smajl 
manllla slips that neoewltated the writing of the entire charging data 
for each book issued for home use, and which were destroyed as soon 
as the book was returned by the borrower. The new system provides 
a permanent card and poclcet for each book. When the book is on 
the shelf the card is in the pocket, and when out, the card becomes 
the chairging dip. This slip is a permanent record of the persons who 
have used the books, and when. 

The operation of putting in the pockets, stamping and inserting 
book cards was dieecribed at length in the Library Joarnal for Juna 
The cost, including time and material was about $50.00, and there was 
no intoTuption of regular business, the change being made by the staff 
on Sunday morning, when twenty people carded 12,000 books* at the 
same time comparing accession numbers, thus thoroughly checking the 

Library. 

The usee to which this system may be put are seiFeral, and In prac- 
tical value they greatly exceed the printed subject catalog, while the 
actual cost of its adoption is merely nominal. 

As a library grows it becomes more and more difficult for students to 
keep up a systematic course of reading, becauise the dassiflcation 
being more complect, the selection of books Is a matter of some dis- 
crimination. So it very often happens that a reader remains in Ignor- 
ance of the very book he hsB been wanting to see. 

The request-card system employed in some libraries, and also in this, 
in some measure does away with this difficulty, but even in that case 
only one reader is notified of the one book he has asked for. 

During the year it has been the practice when new books have come 
in to canvass the classes to which these books are assigned, and if a 
borrower's number was found on the cards of three of four books of a 
certain class it was taken as evidence that he was piuisuing a definite 
course of reading. Gyclostyled lists of the new books were made 
giving full data, i. e., author, title, publisher, date, and retail price of 
book; these were cut up into slips, and mailed with a note to every 
borrower whose number appeared more than twice in a class. In this 
way, astronomy, electricity, evolution, heredity, kindergarten, and 
Froebelian and Herbartlan literature, pedagogy, and psychology were 
canvassed, and about 200 such notes were mailed. 

Not only was the borrower notified of the new books, but if 
his number did not appear upon cards of important books already in 
the Library, or. if by the exigencies of the daseificatlon he was found 
to have' overlooked certain books, slips were mailed to him calling 
attention to these booka So the Kind^gartner in the habit of looking 
for new books in her line in 372, perhaf»a overlooks Preyer in 150; or 



LOS ANGBIiBS PUBLIC UBRABY. 29 

Boch valuable treatises as Tracy's In the Pedagogical Seminary, aad 
Shinn's in the California State Univereity Publications, nnless her 
attention is called to these books and articles. 

The astronomical student accustomed to 520, misses liockyer's Astron- 
omy, in 291; the student of prosody, 426, is gratified to know of Ray- 
mond's "Poetry," and his "Bythm," 801; of Symond's last essays, In 824; 
of Ambros "Boundaries of Poetry and Music," in 701, etc. 

Another important feature Is in the case of requests for the purchase 
of a certain class of books. A few minutes inspectUxn will show If 
books of a like nature are being used, and so show whether or not the 
purchase is warranted by the demand. The possibilities and useful- 
ness of this system make it one of the most adyantageous fea^turcs 
ever introduced into this Library. 

FICTION LIST. 

In March last, the first separate Fiction List of this Library was 
Issued, work on the same having gone on for the previous eight 
months. Some comment has been evoked by the statement ma^e in 
the preface to the List, that Its contents, Fiction, represented a trifle 
less than one-half of the entire number of volumes In the circulatlfi.g 
department Either a good many commentators must have overlooiked 
the word "circulating," as distinguished from "reference department," 
or they have missed the explanation that the List Indnded not only 
novels In the English language, but also those In French, German, and 
Italian, besides the juvenile flctlon, consequesitly the list embraces an 
unusual amount of literature not ordinarily Included In a fiction list 

The list, however, has won for Itself considerable notice from tlie 
profession and the critics, both the Nation, Critic and Library Journal 
having given It some attention. About 300 copies have been mailed to 
fill requests, and a good many copies have been forwarded as exchanges. 
The financial statement shows the sales to have amounted to 2596 
copies to date. 

The day on which the fiction lists were placed on sale, the following 
notice was posted: "From this date no books In class "Fiction," are to 
be brought to the counter for Inspection. The new list Is sold for 10 
cents, much less than cost, In order that every one may own a copy 
from which to make call lists at home. Not less than six call numbers 
should be presented, and attendants will serve those persons first, who 
are provided with lists." 

These rules have had the effect of saving much time for the borrower, 
and of lessening, to some degree, the crowd at the counter. Any 
number of books In other classes may be brought for Inspection. 

RB-CLASSl FIC ATION. 

The considerable additions to the literature (800) class recently made 
the broad classification which had heretofore been entirely satisfactory, 
cumbersome and unwieldy. For instance, in the classes 811 (American 



30 REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRBCTORS 

poetry) and 821 (English poetry) holding each alMMit 300 and 500 
volumes, refipectively, authors r^resented by a number of books were 
scattered throughout the classes,, i. e., Riley might have been found in 
two or three places in American poetry, and Edwin Arnold in as many 
in English poetry. 

As the pupOs in the High and NoirmaJ S<diools came to use the 
Library more and more, it was in satisfying their demands that much 
difficulty and loss of time was experienced in using the books on liter- 
ature arran^od according to a broad classification. Immediately upon 
the opening of the present school year, therefbire, a close elasaiflcatioii 
of class 800 was begun, which has just been completed. Dewey was 
followed in every instance except in the "minor author" subdivision of 
the chroinological classlfieatloin of poetty, essays, and the drama. 

In these instances the notation of the minor authors was increased 
by the addition of the Cutter autlior number, thus preserving the idea 
which led to a re-classification in the first place, i. a, of keeping all of 
the works by one authoi* together; so Kipling's "Barrackroom Bailads," 
formerly plain 821:00, now stands labeled 821.89: K 62. 

In order to keep intact this purpose of bringing all of the works by 
one author together, it was necessary to assign to each author an 
individual number, or to make his number individual 
by the addition of the Cutter author number. In consequence, 
a slight deviation from Dewey was deemed advisable. The case of 
Ho wells will serve as an illustration. In the index this author 
appears with one clas;»lficatlon number, viz., American Fiction, 813.43. 
So instead of distributing the works- of HowcUs, other than fiction, 
among American poetiy, essays and the drama, in all of which forms 
of literature he is repi-esented, his works were concentrated in that one 
of these forms In which he Is best known, viz., the drama. In American 
drama, no place being provided for him, he was given the first vacant 
number in the Americaai drama of the 19th century, 821.41, and all the 
works by and about Howells were concentrated in this class. 

This principle of concentratian has been adliered to wherever possible. 

This class has been otherwise remodeled by the addition of the larger 
part of 928 (biography of literature). The volumes which have been 
so re-classified number about 2000. 

GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS. 

The classification of nearly 5000 volumes has been completed, and 
slielf-llsts have been made both for the Congressional and Department 
publications. 

The foi-mer exceed the latter in numbere, and aggregate a fairly 
complete set from the 28th to 52nd Congressea The shelf -lists were 
made In the same maimer as those used throughout the Library, and 
show accession numbi>r, the Congress, Session, and whether House or 
Senate Journal, Kepoi-t and Execuitlve, or Miscellaneous Document 



LOS ANGBIiBS PUBLIO LIBRARY. 31 

The arrangement is chronological by congress and session, and then 
classified by Senate and House documents, respectively, in the order as 
above named. Bach congress is headed with the dates embraced 
between its first and last session, and the namee of its cabinet officei-a 

The department publications are classified first by department, and 
then the publications of each department are classified in order of 
importanoB as follows: First, the reports of Secretary and subor- 
dinates, then the publications of the barenais, and then the miscel- 
laneous publications. A notation has been devised to correspond to 
thifl classification, and shelf-sheets of these doouments have alao been 
completed, and wherever necessary, crofie-referenoes have been made 
to volumes of the CJongressional set. Publications in pampliki; fonn, 
1. e.: those of the bureaus of the AgrieuJtural Department, and of the 
bureaus of Education are bound in temporary manilla binders, and 
lettered on the back. The Congressional set is kept for reference, while 
the Department set is circulated. 

SELECTION OP BOOKS FOR PURCHASE. 

This part of Library routine involves the greatest responsibility and 
work. The library patrons file many hundreds of requests for books, 
and such lists are always considered first when book purchases are 
made. The Principal of the Reference Room reports ail subjects upon 
which the resources of the Library have been found to be Inadequata 
and in the same manner the circulating department's needs in books 
ore reported; then begins the search through publishers* lists and crit- 
ical reviews of books in order to determine which book will best 
answer these reguirements. Where the funds are as limited as in this 
library, every book must be carefully considered before being 
purchased. 

It has been the rule to endeavor to build up systematically one class 
each year. Glass 800, Literature, was the feature this year. Notices 
were sent to teachers of English and Literature in the High School. 
State Normal School, and to teachers of half a dozen leading private 
schools, asking for suggestions, and to meet at the Jilbrary for disciu^ 
Bion. The result was most satisfactory. Some hundreds of books 
were discussed, aud a list was agreed upon which resulted in the dupli- 
cation of many books, so that each literature class could have at least 
one copy of the books most needed. The teachers present represented 
two thousand stiidents to whom the Library is a laboratory for daily 
work. The plan was so successful that the teachers of Histoi-y, Biog- 
raphy, and Geography have requested a like symposium. 

The result of these investigations and conferences is finally set forth 
in the form of requisitions, which are presented to the Book Committee 
of the Board for consideration and approval. 



32 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIREXTTORS. 

children's reading. 

Children are eligible to library membersblp at the a«6 of 12 yea«» 
and several thousand ara enrolled. Great care is taken In the selection 
of books that are marked as suitable for young people. Adams, Alger, 
Foedlck, continue to be prime favorites, but the sui^y Is kept at the 
lowest point, whUe Alcott, Henty, Coffin, Champney, Knox, and authors 
of the better class are largely duplicated. The Library contains a ferev 
books only that are circulated by permission. They are not so desig- 
nated in the lists, but are kept in the office of the librarian. 

The most capable employees are on. duty at the delivery desk and 
come In direct contact with the borrower, and so far as is possible^ In 
the rush and pressure of work, direct and Influeince the choice of books 
by young people. 

Tbte distributloin of 15,116 volumes in the schoola had the careiful 
supervision of the teachers; annotated lists are printed in order that 
parents may have some guide in seeing that their children are reading 
profitable books. No opportunity is neglected to introduce good books 
to the notice of the juvenile reader, and to encourage systematic 
reading. 

LIBRARY BUILDING. 

The present quarters of the library are so cramped and inadequate, 
that the public are subjected to crowding, l>ad ventilation, delays and 
confusion which make the drawing of a book a disgraceful scramble. 

The total shelving capacity in the circulating room is 18,000, while 
the stock of books numbers 32,166. The number constantly out is 
16,000, and if the circulation should fall off or fail to increase in the 
same ratio as books are purchased, it will be a difficult problem to know 
where to put them. 

Steps should be taken at once to erect a libraiy building, and even 
were the matter to be given instant attention the storage limit would 
be overtaxed before a building could be finished. In view of present 
exigencies an effort should be made to secure the rooms on the library 
floor now occupied by the Superintendent of Schools, and those dasses 
of books most used by the High and Normal school pupils, I. e. Litera- 
ture, Biography and History, transferred to these rooms, and direct 
access to the shelves be there Inaugurated. 

SCHOOLS. 

If possible some plan should be formulated jointly by the school 
and Library Board whereby the library fund of the school moneys 
will be expended more in accordance with the agreement entered into 
by the School Board of 1891 and this Board, and, in view of the fact 
that the library is the working laboratory of the city school system 
there should be a hand-book giving a method of use of the library, 
and the teachers should be required to give some instructions to pupils 
as to the manner of using the Library. As it is now, between 3 and 5 



UM AKQSLte PUBLIC UBRART. 88 

P. M. on every school day a large portloQ of tiie pupils of the higher 
ajiaamm come in a body to the Library with no definite idea of what 
they want, qnite oyertaxing the Library's tesKMHTes in books and help^ 
and at a loss of time to the stadents. 

By the modem method of instmction, scdiools most have access to a 
Hbrary to do good work, and there must be oooperatioii of schooi and 
library boards to bring about more satisfactory results. 

It has been shown that in Oalifomia but 2 per cent of the school 
childc^n eyer go to the High Sctiools and this large proportion) is 
dependent upon a public library for their education in the higher 
branches. 

There is little doubt if the general public had to choose between 
having a High School or a good library, the library would be the cbolo& 

It can be safely said that no other taxes paid by the tax payers of 
Los Angeles bring as large returns in benefit to the people generally as 
does the library tax. 

DBLIVBRY STATION. 

From year to year the desirability of delivery stations has been 
urged, both as an acoommodaticHi to the public, and to lessen the over^ 
crowding of the delivery room. A beginning of the system might be 
made in connection with the two OoUege Settlements that have beea 
started in districts where access to libmxy privileges would be of great 
moral and educational benefit 

Oareful investigations have been made with the assistance of some of 
the teachers, as to the kind of books read by boys and girls in the 
sections of the city farthest from the Library, and it has been found 
that the iniquitous '^nickel novel," with its heroes of highwaymen and 
tUevea, had full sway. The "library book" will supplant such vicious 
books if made availaMe, and as children will read, it becomes a public 
responsibility to bring th^ Library within the reach of all. 

CATALOGS 

The library has not printed a general list of books since 1891, and 
since then 19,000 volumes have been added, which are unknown to 
the public save through the medium of the shelf-sheets, and by means 
of personal inquiry, both being inadequate means with which to serve 
some 2500 people daily. Rudolph Indexer machines should be puiv 
chased at once, and a force of catalogera put to work to compile a 
dictionary catalog to use in them. The publication of special lists 
should be begun at once, and, used in connection with the book-card 
system, they would do away with the necessity of a printed general 
catalog, and while money would be saved, they would at the same 
time be giving greater satisfaction to the public. 

It is vitally necessary that these recommendations be cairied out at 
once if the Library is to be considered a useful institution. As a 



84 RXPOBT or BOARD OT DIBBCT0S8 

• 

bnainees propoattion It will be poor policy for the municipality to neglect 
this branch of ItB buslneaB after having invested the amotmt of capital 
which it ailready has in the Library's equipmieint. 

The status of the Library for the paot two years has been one of 
frautlo struggle to do» in mercantile parlanoe, a $100,000 business on a 
$10,000 capital. The patronage is an accoimplished fact, but stock, 
equipment, locaition, space, and help, fall very far below the proper 
bufiiness level. 

Some plan should be formulated and presented to the Representar 
tives of the State Legislature from this vidnity, urging a better distri- 
bution of State documents to the libraries of the State. Those that 
this Library has secured have been sent by friends as a personal 
accommodation. There should also be a resolution passed giving 
municipal libraries in this part of the State the right to borrow books 
from the State Library— this Is done in most of the Eastern States^ and 
is only fair. We often have requests to furnish special books 
which are of the highest importance to our section, but which this 
Library can not hope to own, and if the rich store of the State 
Library could be called upon for a temporary loan it would give great 
satisfaction to many people. 

The elevator service of the City Hall is a source of constant com- 
plaint from the Library users, and is a well grounded one. It is no 
unusual thing to see the running of the oar intrusted to half a dozen 
different boys in one day. The car is constantly overcrowded and 
the present careless system is a menace to life, and should not be 
tolerated. 

TBSSA L. KELSO, 

Librarian. 



LIST OF DONATIONS 

TO THS 

Los Angeles Public Library. 



Addams, Miss J 

Allen, W.L 

American Institute of Civics. 



Amherst College 

Anoaymous 

Anthropological Society 

Appel, W 

Annstrone, W. M 

Arnold, H.M 

Aaslin, Miss A. D 

Baltimore Superintendent Public Schools. 

Bangor Public Library 

Barrows, I. D 

Banmgardt, R. R. 



Birmingham Free Library 

Bootle Free Library, England 

Boston, Municipal Reports 

Boston Public Library 

Boston Superintendent Public Schocris. 

Brockton Public Library 

Brookline Public Library 

Brooklyn Public Library 

Brown, ReT . S. IV , ......... 

Bryn Mawr College 

BuiEalo HistorlcalSodcty 

Buffalo Library.... 

BuiEalo Society of Natural Sciences. . . 

Bureau of American Republics 

Butte Free Public Library 



BOOKS. 



Byrne, M. J. 

California Academy of Sciences. 

California Bank Commissioners. 



California Library 

California SUte Mineralogist 

California State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

California State UniTersity 

Carnegie Free Library 

Carson Oty 

Chard, T. s 

Chicago Board of Education 

Cincinnati Cdlege of Music 

Cincinnati Museum Association 

Cincinnati Public Library 

Cleveland Public Library. 

Collins, H. O 

Colorado State University 

Columbia College 

Concord Free library 

Connecticut Historical Society. 

Cornell University 

Cortvriend, A .•• 

Council Bluffs Free Library 

Oroyden Public Library 

CuyaSfA 

Darlow, Mrs. B. E 

Davidson, A 

Dayton Public Library and Museum 



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BEPOBT OF BOABD OF DIRBCTOBS 



Denver Public libnunr 

Des Moinei Public liSrary 

I>eCroit Public Ubniry 

Dobinson, G A 

Drezel Institute. 

Dunlop, Mrs. I. S 

Bmma Willara Association 

Bngland, Royal Oonrniission on Labor. 

Enoch Pratt Free Library 

Krskine, E. Parne 

ErspenmuUer, w 

Friend's Book Association 

Friend's Free Library 

Glasgow, Free Library 

GlorersviUe Free Libranr. 

Libi 



BOOKS. 



Grand Rapids Public Library 

Haines, R. R 

Harlem Library 

Harris. Mrs. Pauline G 

HarrisDurfT Public Schools 

Hartford, Gonn« Municipal Reports 

Hartford Public Library 

Harvard University 

Harvard University Library 

Helena Public Library 

Howard.F. H 

Howland,Mrs. J. £ 

Hull, E. V 

Uion,N. Y. Public Library 

Indian Rights Association 

IndlanapoTis Superintendent Public Schools 

Interstate Conmerce Conunissioa 

Iowa Labor Bureau 

Iowa Masonic Library 

Iowa State Library 

Jefferson City. Mo. Municipal Reports 

Jersey Citv Public Library 

Johns HopUns University. 

Johnson, Hon. T. L. 

Kercheval. L. S 

Kinney, Abbott 

Lafayette Public Libraij .. 

Leland Stanford Tr. University 

Lenox Library, New York... 

Lick Observatory 

London Charities Reports 

Los Angeles Board of Trade 

Los Angeles Chamber of Cooiraerce 

Low, Seth, President of Columbia College. . 

Luckenbach, C. A 

Lnmmis, Dr. Dorothea 

Lyford, S. J 

Linn Public Library 

Manuel, George 

Manchester Free I^brarv 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station . 
Massachusetts Institute of Technolgy . ...... 

Masser, Dr. W. H 

Mathews, Albert 

Medill,Hon. Jos 

Michigan State University 

Milwaukee Public Library 

Minneapolis Public Libraiy , 

Missouri Botanical Garden 

Monmouth Library 

Monroe, Will S 

Moore* C. M. .... ..«•........• 

Mortimer, G.White 

Mount Holyoke CoWyrt.. 
National Divorce Reform 

Nebraska Historical Society 

Neighborhood, Guild, N. Y. 

New Bedford Free Public Library 

Newcastlesm-Tyne Public Library 

New England Conference of Bdncatfcasl BnAen. 



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LOS AKOUS FDBUO UBKAKT. 



87 



New HainiMhire Historical Society 

New Haven Free Public Library 

New York, Airuilar Free Library 

New York Board of Sducatioa 

New York Cathedral Library 

New York Charities 

New York Free Library 

New York Labor Bureau 

New York State Library 

New York State University 

Newark Free Public Library 

Newton Free Library. .. . 

Norwich Free Library, Eng^land 

Oakland Free Library 

Oates, W. C 

Ohio Labor Bureau 

Omaha, Nebraska, Municipal Reports 

Oran^ County, Calilomia, Public Schools 

Overton, IfissG 

Peabody Institute, Danvers 

Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts 

Peoria Public Library 

Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences 

Philadelphia Apprentices' Library 

PhikidelphiaCityLibTary 

Philadelphia Museum 

Philadelphia Public Library 

Philadelphia Public Schools 

Poole, W. F.'. 

Portland Library 

Potts, Mrs. L. 

Pratt Institute Free Library 

Providence Public Library 

Pullman Car Co 

Kedlands Public Library 

Rhode Island Historical Society 

Rochdale Free Public Library 

Rust, H.M 

Salem Public Library 

San Bernardino County, California, Public Sdiools. 

San Francisco Associated Charities 

San Francisco Free Public Library 

San Francisco Mercantile Library. 

San Francisco Public Schools 

San Francisco Tool Co 

Bcanland, 1. M 

Scranton Public Library 

Sheffield Public Libraries 

Shephard, Mrs. F. W 

Smithsonian Institute.... 

Solano, Mrs. Alfred 

Somervil le Public Library 

Southern California Historical Society 

Springfield, 111 

Springfield, III. Bureau of Labor. 

Springfield ^Mass. Public Library 

St. Joseph Free Public Library 

St. Louis Supt. Free Public Schools 

St. Paul Public Library 

Stratford, A. W 

Swansea, Wales, Free Library 

Bvdney Free Public Library 

Teed, Freeman G 

Throop Polytechnic Institute 

Topeka Free Library 

Toronto Public Library 

Trenton, N.I. Municipal Reports 

Tynemouth Free Library 

Union Pacific R. R 

United States Civil Service Commission 

United States Department of Agriculture 

United States Department of Bducation 

United States Department of Interior 

United States Department of I^bor... 

United States Department of Treasury 



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REPOBT OF BOARD OF DXRECfFOBS 



United States Department of War 

Upsala, Sweden, Royal University Library 

Vail, I.N 

Vermont State University 

Victoria University, Toronto 

Victoria I>epartment ol Agriculture 

Voorhees D. W 

Wade, K. H 

Wagner, H 

Ward, J. S 

Waters, C. C 

Watertown. Mass. Free Public Library 

Welcome, S. B 

Wesleyan University • 

Weymouth, A. B 

Wevmouth Mass. Tufts Library 

White, Stephen M 

Wilkes<Barre Public Library 

Wisconsin State Historical Sodeiy 

Wisconsin State Superintendent ox Public Instruction. 

Wobum Public Library 

Worcester, Dr. S 

Worcester Free Public Library 

Wyomlnir Agricultural Collej^e 

Yale University 

Yates, L . 



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jmnual Repon 

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Board of Directors 

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Report of tf)e Clbrarian 




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Public Tlbrary 



I894-95 



Seventh Annual Report 



OP m 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THB 



Los Anaefes Pubfic Libra 



AND 



Report of the Librarian 



DECEMBER. 189$ 



I 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



DIRECTORS. 



GEO. H. BONBBRAKB, President. 
PRANK P. FLINT, GEO. H. STEWART, 

H. W. O'MELVENY, H. E. STORRS. 



COMMITTEES. 

Books and Donations, 
H. W. O'Mblvbny, H. E. Stor&s. 

Rules and Administration, 
H. W. O'Mblvbky, H. E. Storrs. 

Auditing and Accounts, 
Gbo. H. Stbwart, Frank P. Punt. 

Printing and Supplies, 
Frank P. Punt, Gbo. H. Stbwart. 

Attendants, 
H. E. Storrs, Gbo. H. Stbwart. 



Mrs. C. B. Powlbr, Clerk and Librarian. 
Anna D. Austin, Assistant Librarian. 

Attendants. 

Cblia Glbason, Gbrtrudb Darlow, 

NBLLiB Russ, Anna Bbcklby, 

EUZABBTH FaRGO» CoRINNB WISB, 

Harribt Mbrcbr, Blanchb Ptttnam, 

Florbncb Thornburg Mattib Tbdford, 

Lbix^a Kingslby Edith Moorb, 

Nora A. Mili.br, Pbarl Glbason, 

Bbrtha B. Pibrcb, Gborgia Horgan, 

Mary Johnson, Mabbllb Hand, 

Mabbl Dunn, ' Mabbi* Prbntiss, 

Anna Earl. 




REPORT ^ 

OP TBB 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

OP THB 

Los Angeles Public Library 

DECEMBER, 1895 



To the Honorable Council of the City of Loi Angeles: 
Gentlemen : 

In accordance with the provisions of the City Charter, we here- 
with submit the annual report of the Board of Directors of the Los 
Angeles Public Library for the year ending the 30th day of Novem- 
ber, 1895. 

Upon assuming our position common prudence dictated that no 
departure should be made from the method of our predecessors in 
office until we had familiarized ourselves with the workings of the 
system which they had created and adopted. The experiences of 
our first year have demonstrated that a course that was prudent 
then should in no essential particular be departed from. 

We deem it a pleasure to call the attention of Your Honorable 
Body, as well as the citizens of Los Angeles in general, to the fact 
that, considering the obstacles in the way, and the means of their 
disposal, the former Board of Directors had brought the manage- 
ment of the Public Library to such a point of usefulness, that this 
board has not found it practicable or advisable to make any general 
departure therefrom. Therefore, this report will not note any radical 
departure from the method of conducting the affairs of the Public 
Library in use heretofore, nor shall we outline any such as indicative 
of our course in the future. 



4 RBPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

The reports made to Your Honorable Body by the Board of 
Directors and the Librarian for the respective years 1892-93 and 
1893-94, contained, in themselves, such an exhaustive statement of 
the history and comparative growth of the Library, together with 
such a complete statement of the details of its management, that 
any further statements upon these points have been thereafter ren- 
dered unnecessary. A cursory examination of these reports would 
have foreshadowed the fact that the continued success and prosperity 
of the Los Angeles Public Library was menaced by two important 
facts : first, lack of funds ; second, lack of accommodations. 

The necessity for the purchase of new books, as well as the 
necessity for the accommodation of an increased membership, have 
increased in a steady ratio, while the means for the purchase of the 
former, as well as the space for the accommodation and convenience 
of the latter, have remained stationary. 

The solution of these problems has called for the best efforts of 
the present board, and if the public demands a better service than is 
afforded by the management of the Library, it must place more 
adequate means at the disposal of the Board of Directors. The 
rapid increase of the population of the city has made itself plainly 
manifest in the use of its library, and created exigencies perhaps 
unanticipated. 

While, as heretofore stated, we have made no essential depart- 
ures from the management inaugurated by the former board, we 
claim that an examination of the Librarian's report herewith sub- 
mitted will demonstrate the fact that we have emulated them suc- 
cessfully. 

It will be observed from the report of the Librarian that, while 
the general circulation of the Library during the year 1893-94 was 
489,096 volumes, the circulation for the past year has been 541,457 
volumes ; an increase of 52,361 volumes ; an increase of almost 1 1 per 
cent. That while the daily circulation for home use during the year 
1893-4 was 1083 volumes, the average daily circulation for home 
use during the year 1894-5 ^^ 1227 volumes, an increase of 141 
volumes per day, or an increase of about 13 per cent. 

It will furthermore be observed, that during the year 1893-4, 
the circulation for home use was 339,403, yet the circulation for 
home use, during the year ending with this report, was 371,638, an 
increase of 42,235 volumes, or an increase of about 13 per cent. 



LOS ANGELAS PUBLIC LIBRA&Y 5 

That while the use of volumes in the reference room for the year 
1893-4 was 38,271, yet during the year 1894--5 the same had increased 
to 51,216, making a total increase of 12,945 volumes, or about 33 
per cent. 

Taking as the fairer view as representing the total work of the 
Library, its total circulation, it will be observed that while the total 
circulation has increased almost 11 per cent., nevertheless the sala- 
ries paid for the year 1893-4, inclusive of Sundays and holidays, was 
$10,521.63, while the salaries paid for the year 1894-5, including 
Sundays and holidays, was $10,948.47. The increase of this year 
over last being the sum of $426.84, or about 4 per cent. So that 
while the general circulation, as representative of the general work 
of the Library, has increased almost 11 per cent., the amount 
expended by way of salaries for services, has been increased but 
about 4 per cent. 

If the test of a usefulness of a library lies in its home circula- 
tion, the foregoing figures, showing an increase of 13 per cent du- 
ring the past year, gives gratifying evidence of the appreciation of 
the citizens of Los Angeles of its library ; but if, as we think fairer, 
in addition to the home circulation of books, there be added to it 
the use of the library for the purpose of reference, an examination 
of the foregoing table will show that the circulation in the reference 
department has increased to the astonishing extent of 33 per cent. 
The circulation at home, as well as the circulation in the reference 
room, taken together, conclusively show the immense educational 
force the Public Library is imparting to the citizens of Los Angeles. 

It has been indicated above that the two important factors 
which threaten the continued growth and prosperity and usefulness 
of the Library are, first, lack of money ; second, lack of room. 
When the funds raised by taxation for the benefit of the Library are 
placed in the hands of the Board of Directors, an apportionment 
thereof becomes immediately necessary. First, the salaries must be 
provided for ; after that comes the absolutely necessary expendi- 
tures for the carrying on of the Library, the renewals of subscrip- 
tions to periodicals, printing, stationery, binding of books, furniture 
and renovations, so that after these fixed items and salaries are pro- 
vided for, the remainder left for the purchase of new books is re- 
duced to a comparatively insignificant sum ; and when it is remem- 
bered that from this remainder provision must be made for the pur- 



6 * RBPORT OP BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

chase of standard works which have become absolutely worn out, 
through use in the Library, the remainder left for the purchase of 
additional books for the use of the Library is reduced to an amount 
absolutely incompatible with the wants of the Library and the de- 
mand of its patrons. 

The per capita circulation of books in the city of Los Angeles 

is, without doubt, the largest of any city in the United States. It 
will probably be safe to say, that the average is no less than six per 
capita. Our inability to purchase additional books, throws an in- 
creased demand upon the books that are at present in the Library. 
An increased demand means increased wear and tear. It means an in- 
creased expenditure for the purpose of keeping the books in a con- 
dition fit for circulation, and it means a shorter life for the books. 
In this manner, the cost of binding is most materially increased, 
and the shortened life renders it necessary to replace standard and 
permanent books very frequently, so that the money placed at the 
disposal of the Book Committee for the purchase of new books is ex- 
hausted by these conditions. 

The apportionment by the City Council for the Library Fund, 

for the current fiscal year, ending June 30, 1896, was 4ji cents on 
each one hundred dollars of the assessed value of all taxable prop- 
erty amountiDg to $21,999.30. The maximum limit fixed by the 
City Charter allows an apportionment for the Library purposes of 
five cents on each one hundred dollars of taxable property. If the 
full apportionment had been allowed, the Library Fund would have 
received $24,443.65, or $2,444,35 more than at present has been 
placed in the hands of this Board of Directors. It is much to be re- 
gretted that the full apportionment was not made, for the reason 
that this extra amount would have enabled the Directors to have 
purchased books absolutely necessary for a Library that is alive, and 
especially of a Library that has the demand made upon it by as 
varied and cultured a population as the city of Los Angeles now has 
within its bounds. The additional amount would have been a mere 
trifle in the general tax levy. It would have been felt by no citizen 
whomsoever, and the tax-payers of this city would have received 
benefits from it vastly greater than the expenditure of any like sum 
in any department of the City Government, and it would have en- 
abled this Board of Directors to have advanced the Library along 
the path of progress and along the lines where it would accomplish 
good work. 



U>S ANGBI<KS PUBUC LIBRARY 7 

Another of the evils attendant upon our inability to purchase 
new books lies in this : we are apt to destroy the equilibrium and 
symmetry that should be preserved in a good Library. Already, 
by our predecessors, the line of fiction has been advanced, not, per- 
haps, at the expense of other more important departments of litera- 
ture, but what we should consider slightly out of proportion to such 
other departments. Many works of biography, history, literature, 
and science are needed, but inasmuch as we are tmder the necessity 
of maintaining what we have already had, we are unable to bring 
these particular subjects to a proper proportion with the works of 
fiction. 

There are many persons in this city engaged in manual pur- 
suits, who are desirous of supplementing their practical knowledge 
by a theoretical acquaintance with the best literature available upon 
the subject. They are thus rendered better equipped in their par- 
ticular lines, and this better equipment enables them to earn more' 
money than they would without such special study. Again, study 
of economic and social questions and the teachings contained in 
books of history, travel and biography, tend to make better citizens. 
The realization of all these efforts must be offered through the Public 
Library, and we must be able to supply these people with the requi- 
site books, if we expect the institution to do the work it should do. 

The salaries paid to our employes are probably lower than for 
like work in any dty of the United States, and no more earnest, ac- 
curate, polite and skillful employes are under the employment of any 
municipal or public corporation in the State of California, than the 
attendants of the Public Library. Their labor is continuous, and 
demands education and constant watchfulness. In many particu- 
lars great attention must be given to minor details, and while it is 
not within our power to grant them an increase of salary, their 
work deserves it. 

In consideration of the foregoing, we would respectfully re- 
quest Your Honorable Body, at the next tax levy, to allow the 
Board of Directors an apportionment equal to the maximum per 
centage allowed by the Charter. 

We feel that we would be lacking in our duty if we did not 
again press upon the attention of Your Honorable Body the lack of 
room space for the work that must necessarily be done in and about 



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Emm\ K«|)oii 

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Board of Directors 

and « « « • • 

Keport of the Qbrarian 



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Cos Jlttdeks 



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Public tibrary 



I$94"95 



lO REPORT OP BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

most practical machine catalogs that have been invented. Their 
convenience and feasibility has been tested in some of the larger 
libraries of the United States, and the verdict in favor of their use 
is unanimous. Attendants of the Library have been delegated to 
catalog the work. 

The first indexers will be devoted to the works of fiction. 
When the catalog is complete the indexers will be placed in the 
general circulation room for the use of the patrons of the Library. 
The work of cataloging the whole Library will be proceeded with 
with all due expedition, and as fast as the same is completed new 
indexers will be purchased, so that in a reasonable time the public 
may anticipate that a complete catalog of the Library will be 
open for their inspection, offering an opportunity for the public to 
acquire; a knowledge of what books the Library contains so easily 
that he who runs may read. The constant habitues of the Library 
will readily appreciate what a source of satisfaction that will be. 

The Board desires to take this opportunity of thanking Mrs. C. 
B. Fowler, the librarian, and Miss Anna Austin, her assistant, for 
the many favors they have shown to the Board, both as a body and 
individually, during their turn of oflSce. And the Board further- 
more desires to indicate its high appreciation and commendation for 
the manner in which they have each performed the duties devolved 
upon them in their positions. That Mrs. Fowler has easily acquired 
a knowledge of the details of the position, and has great executive 
ability, is evidenced by the successful manner in which the Library 
is now being conducted. She has further been very ably assisted by 
Miss Austin, who has carried into her new position the same faith- 
fulness of service and careful attention to details that were evidenced 
in her former work as a library attendant. The Board has naught 
but words of praise for the decorum, observance of discipline and 
hard, earnest work on behalf of the attendants of the Library. In- 
dividual selection would be invidious, where all so equally excel. 

If much of what has been said heretofore is trite, and has been 
oft repeated to Your Honorable Body, and to you and to others it 
may seem unnecessary to have ic reiterated, otir justification is, in 
the interest which we have in our Public Library. We realize, as 
perhaps no others do, that the condition of the Library is a critical 
one. We realize that the demands made upon it vastly exceed the 
resources at our command ; that it has earned in the past a reputa- 



LOS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY II 

tion second to none in the United States ; that it is regarded among 
libraries as an institution, a model of its class ; that to the citizens 
of the United States, of note and culture, it is eminently significant 
of the progressiveness and high grade of culture of the citizens of 
Los Angeles ; and that to the citizens of Los Angeles it is, in itself, 
a source of the purest entertainment, and an educational factor of 
tremendous influence. 

We desire, by every means in our power, to maintain it as a 
progressive, aggressive institution, one up to date and fully abreast 
with this wide-awake city. We do not desire that it merely mark 
time, and we would deprecate that it should lag behind. We are 
therefore determined, by a respectful but persistent insistance of its 
wants and demands, to do our part toward overcoming the obstacles 
that now confront it, and eventually placing it where it will success- 
fully maintain the reputation of the city of Los Angeles for all 
things that are best. Respectfully submitted. 

Geo. H. Bonbbrakb, 

President Board of Directors. 




REPORT 



or 



THE LIBRARIAN 



1894-95. 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Library : 
Gentlbmbn : 

I beg leave to submit to you herewith, the Seventh Annual Report of the 
Librarian, a statement of the work of the Library from December i, 1894, to 
to December i, 1895. 

The apportionment by the City Council to the Library Fund for the cur- 
rent fiscal year ending June 30, 1896, was four and one-half cents on each one 
hundred dollars of the assessed value of all taxable property, amounting to 

$2i.999-30- 

The maximum limit fixed by the City Charter allows an apportionment 

for Library purposes of five cents on each one hundred dollars of taxable 

property. If the full apportionment had been allowed, the Library Fund 

would have received $24,443.65. 

The receipts and expenditures of the Library Fund for the past year are as 

follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance apportionment, 1894-95 $13,130 00 

Received on apportionment, 1895-96 9.4S5 37 

82 books lost and paid for 67 34 

Duplicate books and magazines sold 33 45 

849 Finding lists sold, @ 10 cents 84 90 

Dues 29 85 

Fines 1,237 04 

Rebate on Insurance premiums 23 40 

Shelf sheets and paper sold ^ 3 13 

Freight, expressage and postage returned x 73 

$23,076 21 



$15 58 



LOS AN6KLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 13 

EXPENDIT CJBES. 

Oyerdraftfrom 1893-4 $3ti23 12 

Books $911 62 

Periodicals 189 31 

Binding „ 1,799 35 

$3,900 28 

91 lost books found, money refunded $15 08 

Unused postage returned 50 

Printing — 

Blank forms $298 00 

Annual Reports 95 00 

$393 00 

Stationery and supplies 200 84 

Sundries ^ 272 47 

Postage « 148 25 

Exporting Books 10 00 

Advertising 25 25 

Furniture and Fixtures— 

Carpentering $70 15 

Catalogue 21 59 

Gas fixtures 19 90 

Globe files « 3 00 

Trays 3 00 

$117 64 

Salaries ^ 10,668 47 

Sunday and holiday service 280 00 

Janitor 780 00 

Balance 5,141 31 

$23,076 21 
SECURITY DEPOSITS, 1894-95. 

November 30, 1894, to balance $168 47 

1894-95, deposits 410 10 

^ « *578 57 

Bxpenditures— 

1894-95, Deposits returned $491 32 

November 30, 1895, by balance 87 25 

$578 57 
BOOKS. 

*nie number of volumes in the Library on Dec. i, 1894, was 40,152 

Number of volumes added to Dec. i, 1895 2,074 

42,226 
Worn out and discarded.. 515 

4^7" 
I/)st and paid for ^ 82 

Duplicate documents returned 29 

— Ill 



41,600 



*Nninber of ▼cdtmieB in the Library Dec. i«t, 18041 wu taken from I4brarlaa*a report to 
Board of Director*. Statktict taken from reooxda of Library. 



14, 



RBPORT OP BOARD OP DIRBCTORS 



CliASSIFIED OOKTEXTS OF CIRCULATING DEPART- 
MENT. 



CLASS. 



Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts.. 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Biography 



vow. 



516 
1416 
1726 

273 
1270 

776 
698 

3225 
1638 

1613 

1491 



CLASS. 



Fiction 

Juvenile Fiction . 

Music 

French 

German 

Spanish 

Italian 

Bound Periodicals ... 
Unbound Periodicals 

Plates, etc 

General Works 

Pacific States 



Foreign 



VOLS. 



9727 

2610 

799 

1514 

845 

443 
912 

425 
455 



CLASSIFIED CONTENTS OF REFERENCE DEPART- 
MENT. 



CLASS. 



Bibliography and 
Bncyclopedias 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Natural Science... 

Useful Arts 

Pine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 



VOLS. 



584 

8 
82 

195 

1*7 
129 

259 

172 

216 



CLASS. 



Biography 

Fiction 

German 

Spanish 

U. S. Public Documents 

California State Documents.. 

Maps and Atlases 

Bound Periodicals 



VOLS. 



105 

2 
2 

24 
4091 

247 
119 

3427 



Of the discarded books and old magazines some were given to the Soldiers* 
Home, some to the Alamitos Library, and others are held for the Hospital and 
County Farm. 

The orders for books having been placed so late in the fall, accounts for the 
small number added during the past year, as the new books did not arrive in 
time to be counted in this report. 



The amount expended for books this year was $911.62, 



I«OS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



15 



REOISTBATION. 

The total actiTe memberaliip, December x, 1894, was 17,957 » ^^ December 
I, 1895, it was 22,223 ; a net increase of 4,266. 

The total registration for the jear was 4,773 ; of this number 2,067 were 
men and 2,706 were women. 

The number of withdrawals was 669, and the renewals 162. 

The number of notices mailed to borrowers, notifying them that their 
securities would expire, was 5,639. 

The number of changes in addresses discovered, 2581. 

' GIRCUIiATING DEPARTMENT. 

This department was open 303 days during the past year. 

The number of volumes drawn for home use was 371,638. 

The daily average circulation was 1,227. 

The classified circulation for the year is contained in the following table : 

CLASSIFIED OIROUIiATION. 



CLASS. 



Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science... 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Biography 

Prench 

German 

Italian 

Spanish.. 

Music 

Fiction 

Juvenile 

BoundMagazines 

Magazmes 

Plates 



Totals... 



Reference-room readers 



Total circulation. 



FIRST 


SBCOND 


SIX MONTHS. 


SIX MONTHS. 


HOKX. 


LIBRAKT. 


HOMB. 


LIBKAmV. 


1,224 


864 


1,153 


728 


1,721 


990 


1,495 


796 


2,065 


963 


2,114 


858 


247 


292 


387 


464 


2»534 


1.333 


2,265 


1,128 


1,050 


1,016 


908 


883 


1,386 


993 


1,3" 


866 


4.515 


1,582 


4.445 


1,269 


3.391 


1,110 


2.947 


782 


4,672 


1,264 


3.375 


1.358 


2.549 


1,228 


1.949 


1,064 


2,113 


454 


1.632 


652 


1,078 


471 


705 


556 


67 


67 


94 


143 


734 


295 


647 


362 


1,624 


273 


1.596 


502 


103.564 


4.324 


106,826 


3.796 


27.009 


3.363 


25.531 


2,870 


5.496 


2,296 


6,619 


2,130 


17.524 


3.6852 


18,852 


3.7366 


1.430 




794 








185993 
taders ....^ 


60030 


185645 


58573 













TOTAI, 
PORYBA& 



3.969 
5.002 

6,000 

1.390 
7,260 

3.857 

4.556 
11,811 

8,230 
10,669 

6,790 

4.851 
2,810 

371 
2,038 

3.995 
218.510 

58,773 

16,541 

"0,594 

2,224 



490241 
51216 



541457 



The amount received for fines was $1,237.04 ; for the previous year was 
$991.60. 



i6 



RSPORT OP BOARD OP DIRBCTOSS 



The following tablet show the drcnlatioti month by month, for home uae, 
reference and reading-room ; also the daily average of home circulation since 
the Library moved into its present quarters : 

TABLES SHOWING CIRCULATION 

From 1889 to 1895. 



MONTH. 


Home. 


I4bniry 


RefRoom 


Total. 


At. Home 

Use 
Per Day. 


1888-89. 

December, 












January, 1880 ^ 












February ^ 












March... *.. ^^ . .. , 












April 












May « 












Tune... 






^ 






J ••*••• ••••••••■••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

July 












Auinist 












September 


1,415 
2,243 
2,610 


3,418 
3.278 
4.651 




4.833 
5.521 
7,261 


53 
86 


October 




November 




105 






Totals 


6,268 


".347 




17.615 











1889-90. 

December 

January, 1890 

February 

March 



April 

May « 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 



Totals 



3.120 

3.334 
3.261 
4.058 

3,324 
3.628 

3.495 
4.507 
4.585 
4.530 
4.395 
6,067 


6,666 
7.166 

6,544 
7.378 
5,968 
6,232 

6,184 
5.882 

5.899 
6,136 
5.988 
5.025 




9.786 
10,500 

9.805 

".436 

9.292 

9,860 

9.679 
10,389 
10,484 
10,666 

10,383 
11,092 


•••••••••••ft 
























48,304 


75.068 




123,372 





125 

133 
142 

156 

125 
145 

140 

173 

176 

174 
177 

242 



1890-91. 
December, .... 
January, 1891 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 



5.443 
6.372 
6,258 
6,892 

6,539 
6.524 
6,331 



6,938 
7.760 

7.323 
8,045 
7.045 
7.213 
7.013 



12,381 
14.132 
13.531 
14.937 
13.584 
13.737 
13.344 



209 

245 
240 

265 

251 

251 
243 



LOS ANGBUS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



17 



LIBRARY MADE FREE. 



MONTH. 



July 

August , 

September 
October .... 
November 



Totals. 



Home. 


Library. 


Ref.Room Total, i 

1 1 


10,008 
13,882 
15.586 
16.225 
16,129 


6,867 
7.074 
7.183 
7,682 

7.661 


1,169 
1,257 

1.349 
1,702 

2,147 


18.044 
22,213 
24,1x8 
25.609 

25.937 


116,189 


87,804 


7,624 


211,617 



Av. Home 
use pr. D. 

385 

534 

599 
624 

659 



1891-92. 

December 

January, 1892 

February 

March 

April , 

May 

June , 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November .... 



16,740 
18,406 
19.988 
21,003 
19,611 
19,306 
19,028 
19.316 
20, 262 

19.S47 
19.710 
20,146 



7,542 

8,143 
8.041 

8,070 

7,053 
7,465 
7.578 

7.094 
7.500 
7,528 
8,207 

8.515 



Totals I 233,363! 92,736 



2,171 


26,453 


2,236 


28,785 


2,451 


30.480 


2,388 


31,461 


1,87c. 


28,534 


1,791 


28.562 


2,046 


28,652 


1,899 


28.309 


1,784 


29546 


2,295 


29.670 


3,154 


31,071 


3.006 


31,667 


27,09 r 


353.190 



669 

733 
833 
777 
785 
765 
732 
743 
775 
763 
758 

775 



1892-93- 
December 

January, 1893. 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.... 

October 

November .... 



Totals 



21,188 
21,776 
22,119 
24,108 
21,641 
21,872 
20.508 
21,297 

22.473 
22,319 

23,672 

24,081 



267.054 



9,289 


3,937 


34,414 


9.884 


3.222 


34.882 


9.441 


2,803 


34.363 


10,202 


3,376 


37,686 


9,743 


2,556 


33.940 


9,830 


2,653 


34.355 


9.331 


2,329 


32.168 


9,259 


1,902 


32,458 


10,062 


1,950 


34.485 


10,061 


2,206 


34.586 


11.455 


2,919 


38.-046 


11,648 


3,289 


39,018 


120,205 


33,142 


420.401 



tf93-94. 
December 

January, 1894 

February 

March 



April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November. 



Totals 



24.448 
25.391 
24.955 
28.733 
24.490 

27,713 
27,723 

28,894 

29,'5i 
28,010 

30. 2 1 2 

29.685 

329,405 



12,031 

11,734 

10,759 

10,476 

8.813 

9,675 
9,408 

9,357 

9,478 

9,598 

9,519 
10,562 

121,410 



3-343 
3.227 
3.022 
3.458 
2,843 
3.636 
2.711 
2,147 
3,3»8 
3,148 
3.820 

3,898 
38,571 



39.822 
40.352 
38.736 
42,667 
36,146 
41,024 
39.842 
40,398 
41.947 
40,756 
43.551 
44,145 

489,386 



815 
871 
961 

893 
866 

842 

789 
852 
832 

893 
911 

963 



978 

1015 
1085 

1065 
1020 
1066 
1066 
1 156 
1080 
Z120 
1162 
H71 



i8 



RBPORT OP BOARD OP DIRBCTORS 



MONTH. 



Home. 



1894-95- 
December, 

January, 1895 

February 

March 

April , 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September .... 

October 

November 



Totals 



29,128 

32,754 
30,993 
33.064 
29,961 
30,093 

29.349 
31.769 
3i,H88 

29,394 
32,371 
30,874 



371,638 



Library. ,Rcf.Room 



Total. 



Av. Home 
iusepr. D. 



10.159 
11,071 

9.735 
10,538 

8,976 

9.551 
9,287 

9.554 
10,362 

9.607 

9,917 
9.846 



3,873 

4.273 

3,377 
4,902 

3,565 

4,347 

3,454 
4,265 

3,874 

4,559 
5,106 

5,621 



118,603 51,216 



43ii6o 

48,098 

44.105 

48,504 
42,502 

43.991 
42,090 

45,588 
46,124 
43,560 
47,394 
46,341 



541,457 



1 165 
1260 

1347 
1272 

1248 

1 157 
1174 

1222 

1 181 

1225 

1246 

1235 



LIBRARY AND SCHOOLS. 

The system of distribution of books through the city schools has been fully 
explained in the foregoing reports. 

The work was commenced in February of 1891, and has steadily increased. 
The teachers manifest more interest each year as the following table will show : 

NUMBER OF BOOKS CIRCULATED. 

189T, February to November 5,382 

1892-3 11,651 

1893-4 15,116 

1894-5 17,416 

These figures could be doubled had we books sufficient to supply the 
demand. 

New blanks were furnished the teachers with the opening of the present 
school year, which enables them to record tlie circulation of the books among 
their pupils. These records are returned to the Library with the books issued 
thereon. From the records thus far returned we gather the following : 5502 
books have been issued since September i, and the total circulation of the same 
^ 15,570. Many of these books were for the teachers' use and did not cir- 
culate. 

Since the opening of the present school year, in order to leave a good 
selection of juvenile books for general circulation we have been compelled to 
limit the number of books allowed each teacher to fifteen. Heretofore the 
limit has been from twenty to twenty-five, and in the more advanced grades 
the teachers have made good use of thirty or more for supplementary work. 
This scarcity of books is largely due to lack of funds on the part of the Board 
of Education. It has been unable to make the usual appropriations for library 
purposes for the past two years. 

More room in which to carry on this work, also more and better books, 
would make this department one of the recognized factors in the educational 
system of our city. 



tOS ANGBI«BS PUBLIC UBRARY 



19 



The school statistica for 1894-^ are as follows : 



December, 1894. 
January, 1895.... 

February 

March 

Aprils 

May 

September 

October 

November 



HO. or 



3 


1672 


4 


2367 


4 


2510 


4 


2362 


4 


2470 


I 


633 


I 


715 


5 


2930 


3 


1857 



17416 



1894-5. Number of teachers in city 316 

Number of teachers drawing books 200 

REAOIN6-BOOM. 

The number of periodicals on file in the Library for the past year was 444, 
of which 35 were dailies, 117 weeklies, 292 monthlies ; of these 183 were for 
home circulation. 

The number of visitors to the reading-rooms during the past year was 
66,830. Of the Suuday visitors 8890 were men, 2246 women, and 1260 children. 

The greatest number of visitors, 6273, was in April ; the next, 6203, in 
January, and the least number, 4901, in June. 

The amount expended for periodicals the past year was 1 189. 31. This is 
simply for new serials, the bills for renewal of subscriptions not having been 
received. 

The following is a list of serials on file in the library, the number of copies 
of each and the circulation of those in the reading-room : 

PJBBIODICAIiS. 





1' 

COPIES 
ON VTLB. \ 




COPIXS 
ox riLM. 


Arizona Gazette 


1 
1 

1 

* r 

t 1 

* 1 

1 

J 1 

J 1 

T 

'■ 1 
3 

3 1 
2 1 

3 

I 


New York Tribune 




Arizona Citizen 


New Orleans Picayune 




Atlanta Constitution 


Oakland Tribune 




Boston Herald. 


Omaha Bee 




Chicago Tribune 

Cincinnati Com'l Gazette 


Pasadena News 




Philadelphia Ledger 




Congressional Record 

Denver Republican 


Sacramento Record-Union... 
Sacramento Bee 




Los Angeles Daily Journal 

I/>s Angeles Hzpress 


St, Louis Republic 




San DiesTO Union 




I^os Angeles He^'ald „. 


San Francisco Call 

San Francisco Chronicle 

San Francisco Examiner 

Tombstone Prospector 




Los Anifeles Record 




Los Aneeles Times 




New York Herald 




1 







20 



ftBPORT OP BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



WBBKUKS. 



Academy 

American Architect and 
Building News 

American Agricalturist 

American Sentinel 

Argonaut 

Army and Navy Journal 

Athenaeum 

Bee Culture 

Bullion 

California f'armer and La- 
bor Review 

California Fruit Grower 

California Volks Freuud ... 

Capital 

Catholic Tidings 

Catholic Review 

Chap Book 

Citrograph 

Co-operative News 

Courier 

Critic 

Dial 

Dramatic Mirror 

Electrical World 

£1 Commercio 

HI Monitor Mexicano 

Bngineering News 

Bngineeriug and Mining 
Journal 

Pliegenden Blaetter 

Prank Leslie's Weekly 

Ganien and Forest 

Germania 

Globe (Toronto) 

Harper's Bazar 

Harper's Round Table 

Harper's Weekly 

Illustrated American 

Independent 

Investor 

Journal of Education 

Journal of Knights of Labor 

Kaleidoscope 

Las Dos Republican 

Le Progres , 

Life ■ 

* Two copies. 



a 
o 

8 
o 



2 
12 

2 
2 
I 

2 



**■ ilk 

« a 

cs 



f 



29 

291 

105 



35 



78 



313 

24 

589 
76S 



241 

303 

183 
2018 

54 



VrUXXLIMM. 



a 
o 

8 

& 



1 193* 

835 

61 

52 



828 

II22* 

1956 
1838 |! 
188 



46 



2551 



Literary Digest. 

Literary World ; 

Littell's Living Age 

London Graphic 

Loudon Illustrated News... 

Loudon Times 

Los Angeles Sunday World 

L'Union Nouvelle 

Lower Californian 

Manufacturer 

Manufacturer's Review 

Mildura Cultivator 

Mount Lowe Echo 

Musical Courier 

Nation ., 

Nature 

News Letter 

Notes and Queries 

Open Court 

Outlook 

Pacific Rural Press 

Patent Ofl&ce Gazette 

Printers' Ink 

Public Opinion 

Publishers' Weekly 

Punch 

Queen 

Railroad Record 

Revue de Deux Mondes 

Saturday Review 

St. Paul's 

Science 

Scientific American 

Scientific American Supple- 
ment 

Seaport News 

South American Journal 

South Riverside Bee 

Southwest News 

Sud Califomier Post 

Textile Colorist 

Tulare Register 

Twentieth Centurv 

Uber Land und Meer 

Union Signal 

Woman's Journal 

Youth's Companion..... 



195 

37 
287 

2436 
2673 



604 

436 

108 

""is 

54 
142 

199 

49 
254 

25 

1087 

1289 

390 
281 

2195 
41 
4276* 

1677 



U>S AHGBLBS FDBI.IC LIBRARY 
UONTHUBS AND QUARTBRUBS. 



Amer. Acail. Political and 

Social Science 

Amer. Acad. Natural Set- 
American Antiquarian .. 
American Bee Journal.,.. 
American Boolcmaker..,. 
American Economic As» 

American Garden 

American Historical Re- 
American Investments .. 

American Jewess 

American Journal of Medi- 
cal Science 

American Law Review 

American Naturalist 

Am Stillen Meer 

Archsological Journal 

Art Amateur — 

Art Interchange 

Art Journal.. 

Atlantic 

Babyhood 

Badminton 

Biblia 

Blackwood 

Book Buyer. 

Bookman 

Book Newa 

Book Reviews 

Braitbwaite's Retrospect... 
Brooklyn Medical Journal.. 
Bureau of American Repub- 
lics Bulletin 

BnnincM 

Business Folio 

Cal. Poultry Keeper..... 

Catholic World 

Century 

Chamber's Journal 

Chautauqnan 

Child Garden 

Christian Science Journal _ 

Citizen 

Consular Reports 



Contemporary Review. 

Cosmopolitan _ 

Current Hiatory 

Current Literature 

Decorator and Furnisher ... 

Delineator 

.. Demorest- 

Der Techniker 

. Eclectic 

Edinburgh Review 

. Education 

.. Educational Review. 

.. Electrical Engineering... 

Engineering Magaziue ... 

Engineer's Review 

Etude 

Figaro Illustre 

.. Fortnightly Review. 

Foruni 

Geolo)(ical Magazine 

Godey's Magazine 

Good Health 

Good Housekeeping 

International Journal 

Irrigation Age 

Jenness Milfer 

Jobna Hopkins University 

Studies 

lournal Amer. Folk Lore... 

Journal of Botany 

Journal of Education 

.. [journal of Franklin Insli- 

.. Kindergarten 

Knowledge , 

Ladies' Home Journal 

.. I.and of Sunshine 

Land and Water 

* Library Journal 

I.ippincott 

Literary Era 

]Ludfer 

I McClnre 

.. Magaiine of Poetry _ 

.. Manuel of Conchology 



RBPOST OF BOARD OP DIBBCTOKS 

MONTHLiBS AND QnARTBRi.iBS — Continued 



Medico-Legal Journal 

Mind- , 

Mind and Body 

Moniat 

Musical Times 

National Review 

National Popular Review... 

Naulilaa 

New England 

New Review 

Newsman 

Nidiologist 

Niiieteenth Century 

North American Review 

Out Little Men and Women 

Outing 

Overland 

Pacific Educational Journal 
Pacific Health Journal 

Pacific States 

Palestine Bxploratiou Fund 

Pall Mall Magazine 

Paradise of tbe Paci^c 

Pedagogical Seminary 

Photographic Times 

Poet Lore 

Politcial Science Quarte rl j 



Papular Science 

Proceedings Academy Nat- 
ural Science 

Poultry World 

Public School Journal- 

Quarterly Review, 

Resources of CaliComia 

Review of Reviews 

Review of Reviews, Lon- 

Rostrum „ 

Rural Califomian 

St. Nicholas 

Scientific American, Build- 

Scribner 

Short Stories 

Silver Cross 

Cal. Practitioner 

Strand 

Students' Journal 

Teachers' Institute- 

Tennessee Univ. Magazine- 
Traveller 

Voralirt 

Westminater 

Whitder 



687 
758 






NEW PERIODICALS ADDED SINCE LAST REPORT. 



PERIODICALS. 


««. 


PERIODICALS. 


CoplM. 




























PadBc Educational Journal.. 


iAmerican Historical Review... 

1 





LOS ANGBLSS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



23 



PERIODICALS ADDED FOR 1 896. 



PBRIODICALS. 


Copies. 


PERIODICALS. 


Copies. 


Gardenin&T 




Book Buyer 


I 


Boston TranscTiDt 


Scientific American Suplment 
Child Garden 


I 


Fittsbtirsr Disoatch 


3 
7 


Salt Lake Citv Tribune 


Current Literature 


Portland Orefifonian 


Kindercrarten 


/ 
2 


Minneapolis Times 


McClure 

New Hni?land. 


3 


Harner's Weekly 


2 


c^"'^Z.J:::::z 

Dial ; 




Overland 


I 


Little Men and Women 


3 



Since December i, 1894, 5i|3i6 readers have used the reference-room, 
crowding it to its utmost capacity. It has become necessary to detail two at- 
tendants for reference-work, and while the school children are in attendance, 
a third is sometimes necessary. 

Tbese attendants find time during the less busy hours to clip and mount 
magazine illustrations, and to make special lists upon topics of the time to be 
posted in the circulating department, lists for schools, clubs and classes, as 
well as shorter lists for individuals. 

The index to weekly periodicals begun last year, is nearly completed to 
date. Some 3,000 cards have been written. As these periodicals are not cov- 
ered by the Cooperative Index to Periodicals, this list is extremely valuable in 
reference-work. 

348 books have been added during the year, notable among which are : 
Standard Dictionary, International Encyclopaedia, Century Encyclopaedia of 
Names, Furtwangler's Greek Sculpture, sets of Hawthorne, Irving, Scott and 
other standard authors. 

Although in this department access to the shelves is unrestricted, but 
three books have been lost during the year. 



CATALOGING. 

The new year finds us still without a complete index of the contents of the 
Library, as little has been accomplished in this department during the past 
year ; the delivery, reference and repair departments taxing the working force 
to its full capacity. 

The dictionary catalog of classes literature, history, biography and 
travels, already completed, has been continued to date, and work begun on 
fine arts. 

The various clubs and classes studying Shakespeare's works made it neces- 
sary to compile an annotated list — some 1500 cards of material on the subject. 

Two Rudolph Indexers have been purchased, and the work of running the 
catalog of classes already completed, into these machines, and of cataloging 
remaining classes will be commenced at once. A complete dictionary : i. e., 



24 REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRBCTORS 

author, subject and title entry catalog of classes will be placed in the indexert 
at the earliest possible date. 

The work here outlined requires the entire time of the cataloger and two 
assistants for one-half day each, the other half day of each being given to work 
in the reference department. 

Valuable assistance is also obtained from the members of the training 
class. 

This work accomplished, the main energy of this department should be 
turned toward the issuance of special class lists : as history, music, English 
literature, so much in demand. 

A word concerning the Rudolph Indezer, already mentioned : This is the 
latest improyment in cataloging equipment, having the advantage over the 
old card system of presenting at once what would equal four pages of printed 
catalog ; and having the advantage over the printed catalog of being always 
up to date, as insertions may be made in their proper places at any time. 
Pages are easily and quickly shifted by means of a handle on the outside of 
the machine, and are as easily read as the pages in a book. 

MOUJJTED ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Of the many copies of the illustrated magazines taken, as many complete 
volumes as possible are made up for binding. Of the copies too badly used for 
this purpose, odd and extra copies are clipped of illustrations. These are 
mounted on gray bristol board, divided into groups, used for reference and cir- 
culated to the public schools to be used to supplement work. One group con- 
tains portraits of Generals, pictures and plans of several important battles of 
our civil war, others illustrate Italian art, portraits of authors with pictures of 
their environments. 

The illustrations not of use to the library are clipped by the kindergarten 
teachers, who find pictures of use in their work. 

The colored plates accompanying the art magazines are mounted and are 
in great demand by the drawing department of the High School and by primary 
teachers. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

The sta£f numbers twenty-three persons : Librarian, Assistant Librarian, 
fourteen regular day and seven night Attendants. There have been nine pro 
motions and two appointments to the staff; the Principal of the reference-room 
having resigned at the same time as the Librarian and Assistant Librarian. 

The amount paid for salaries was |io,668.47, for Janitor I780.00. Labor 
Day, the first Monday of October, being a legal holiday, was added to the list 
of holidays observed by the Library. 

The amount paid for Sunday and holiday service was $280.00. 

The first training class ander the new administration was started October 
15. 1895. Six young ladies were selected from twenty-two applicants, after 
being examined by a committee from the Board of Directors. The class is in 
charge of the Assistant Librarian and is doing very good work. 



JJOS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 25 

BINDERY AND REPAIRS. 

The nnmber of books and magazines sent to the bindery was 4560. Many 
of these were left from last year on account of lack of funds. A large number 
of magazines needed for the reference-room remained unbound; these have 
been brought up to date as fast as possible. As soon as missing numbers and 
title pages can be again obtained, the remaining volumes will be bound. While 
the binding of these magazines costs quite a good deal, if the valuable informa- 
tion contained in them is to be made available, they should be bound as fast as 
the volumes are completed. 

The number of books repaired in the work-room by the regular employ^ 
was 29,948. 

Cost of binding, $1 799-35 • 

IN GENERAL.. 

During the past year the old order book has been done away with, it being 
a great deal of work to check up an order with part of the books coming in 
months after the order was given. Instead, the card system was introduced as 
more convenient, for with it all new orders can be added and still be arranged 
alphabetically. When the books are received their order cards can be removed 
and only the outstanding order remain. The cards taken out can be used for 
new book lists. 

It was decided not to publish a new Finding List until the cataloging of 
the books was finished and in the Indexera. As it was thought best to spend 
all our time and energies on this work, as at its completion the list could be so 
easily printed at any time. 

The only place to keep the public documents, to store unbound newspa- 
pers, and to file newspapers and magazines until ready for binding, is the attic. 
While there is plenty of space it is so open that the books are covered with 
dust and dirt until they are not fit to be handled, and there is no way of keep- 
ing out the dust. 

The interests of the Library call for a new building, as it cannot progress 
as it should without more room. 

The reading-rooms, reference-room and work-rooms are entirely too small 
for the work done in them, and the book-room has no more room available for 
stacks. 

Thanking the entire staff of employes, as well as the Assistant Librarian, 
for their co-operation in helping me to carry on the work begun so successfully 
by my predecessor, I remain, Very respectfully, 

CLARA B. FOWLER, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

DOrfATIONS. 





i 


j 


1 

Boglnte..' .nd Archit«:«' Am'.. So. 


1 


1 




















ASbolt. Mit. M. B.Z 


; 


i^r'jrx^i'i;:"'?""' 


..'.. 






















' 




JL 












,...'. 




























Baomeaidt. B. R 


Hamilloii P. I, „ _.. 








Hanfstd Unl«;ityl. 


_... 








SS^°S J^bik u£^^~''°°^ ■ — 


!::::; 


Hoboken Prtt P. 'C. _... 


;j 


? 












Sii'iSoit KtrLiSrJ^t'"' ^"'""'^ 




^^i^v. f ::::::::::;::::::;::::"::::":: 


~::: 


; 


ddisnipulls P. L 


E 




arooklyo UtaBTT- _ 





' 








Brjrn M««r College _ 


...... 






i> 




































1 






« 












LrliDd Stmdfoi^ Jr. Uataiii^dtr 









. 








' 












i. 
















C.Snc ofSonsoflheReroluiloB-... 


L - ' Eclfs Bonrd of Trade..... __, 


!!" 


■ 








_.... 































Ciodnnsii Public Ubimry 


— 












— 










ManohfMfr Fr« Library 


T 














Mechaniia and 'i^^deamca, Gciwn 




Council BliiflB free Pnblie Ubrny 


...-. 


















si=;r,:»°,;a^r— :■;-: 











DenTsr Public LitoiVi. 













:"": 














Morw. G«). W. (San Dlcga} ...™„-... 




























LOS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



27 



DONATIONS— Continued. 



Mnybridgre, Badweard 

Naval Architects and Marine Engin- 
eers, Soc. of 

Nebraska Hist. Soc ^ 

Nevafia State Library.. 

Nenbauer, Jacob ^ 

Newark Free P. L 

Newberry Library 

Newcastle-UDon-Tyoe P. L ~ 

New Hampshire Hist. Soc ^ 

New Haven Free P. L 

Newton Free Library 

New York Bureau ot Statistics. 

New York Central and Hudson R. 
R. n_ ^ ^ 

NewYork'ciTi*l*Se*nrt<*'Re£!.*!."..!.*.".'l 

New York SUte Library 

New York University. 

New York University Settlements 

Soc 

Norwich Free Library „ 

Ohio Labor Commission 

Osterhout Free Library 

Overton, Capt. Gilbert H 

Paterson Free P. L 

Pawiucket Free P. L 

Peck, Oeo. Gottsberg^er.. 

Pennsylvania, University of. 

Peoria Public Lit>rary 

Perkins, Geo. C 

Philadelphia Acad. Natural Sciences 

Philadelphia City Institute 

Philadelphia P. L 

Pierce, H. F ^ 

Portland Library Ass'n „ 

Pratt Institute F. L ~ 

Pratt, Enoch F. L 

Providence Athenaeum.. 

Providence F. L- 

Quincy, Miss H. S 

Reynolds Library 

Rhode Island Hist. Soc 

Riverside P. L 

Rochdale Free P. L.. „.. 

Ross, Dr. W. W- 

Rnsh Medical College .« 

St. Joseph Free P. L 

St. Lonis Mercantile Library 

St. Louis Public Library 

St. Lonis Free P. L 

St. Paul 

San Frandaco. Charities of.. 

San Francisco Free P. L 

San Francisco Health Dep't 






I 

a 



I 

a 
2 



9 

a 

I 

X 

3 

X 
X 

2 
I 
X 

29 

X 

X 
X 

13 



3 
I 



X 
X 

I 

3 

3 
3 
3 

9 

3 

I 

I 

13 



I 

I 
I 
I 

3 

X 

10 
3 



San Francisco Municipal Rep't 

San Francisco Mercantile Library 

Salem P. L 

Scranton P. L~ 

School Physiology Jol 

Sioux City, Iowa, Library Soc 

Smithsonian Institution 

Somerville P. L— 

Springfield Art Museum 

Springfield City Library Association.. 

Springfield P. L 

Sutro, Adolph.. 

Sutro Library 

Sydney Free P. L.- 

Tennessee. University of. 

Throop Polytechnic Ins 

Toronto P. h 

Tynemouth P. L 

Tyngsboro 

Union of Hebrew Congregations. 

U. S. Bureau of Education 

U. S Civil Service Com 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

U. S. Dep't of Education 

U. S. Dep't of Interior 

U. S Dep't of Labor 

U. S. Dep't of State.. 

U. S. Dep't of Treasury 

U. S. Dep't of War 

U. S. Superintendent of Docs 

Upsala, Sweden, Kongl Universitet... 

Utica P. L 

Vermont, University of. 

Valentine, B. B 

Victoria, Dep't of Agriculture 

Wellesley College 

Warren Co. Library 

Watertown Free Library 

Webb, Louis K 

Werner Co 

Wesleyan University 

Weymouth, A. B 

Weymouth, Tufts Library 

White, Stephen M 

Wing, A. S 

Wisconsin Hist. Soc 

Wolverhampton Free Library 

Woodman, K 

Worcester, Dr. S 

Worcester Free P. L 

Yale University 

Young People's Magazine 



Total. 



I 



I 

§ 

0i« 



X 

X 

17 

a 

3 

a 
I 

X 

I 
5 

9 
3 
3 



3 
90 



X 

3$ 



3 
I 



3" 



154 

aa 

a 

6 
I 
I 

X 

a 

X 

3 

a 

16 

X 

a 

X 

4 

X 

I 

3 
3 

I 

a 

a 



28 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



DONATIONS— Continued. 



NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS, 



DAII.IIEB. 



Ariaonm Citisen 

Arizona Gaaeette ~.. 

Congressional Record ^... 

Los Angeles Daily Journal.., 
Los Atigeles Daily Bxpress. 
Los Angeles Daily Herald... 
Los Angeles Daily Record.. 
Los Angelett Daily Times .... 

Oakland Tribune 

Omaha Bee 

Oregonian (3 mos.) 

Pasadena News 

Sacramento Record-Union.. 

Sacramento Bee -.. 

San Prandsco Call 

Tomt>8tone Prospector.... — 



19V1EIEKI.I1SB. 



American Sentinel 

Bullion 

California Volksfrcund 

Citograph 

Courier (Single Tax) 

California Farmer and Labor Review. 

Capital — 

Catholic Tidings 

Catholic Review 

El Commercio • 

Bl Monitor Mezicano 

Germania 

Investor........... 

Kaleidoscope. • 

Land and Water 



Las Dos Republicas , 

Los Angeles Sunday World. 

L'Union Nouvelle 

Le Progres 

Lower California 

Manufacturer 

Mildura Cultivator 

Mount Lowe Echo 

Patent Office Gasette 

Railroad Record 

South Riverside Bee 

Southwest News 

Sud Califomier 

Tulare Register 

Union Signal 

War Cry 









MONTHLIBS. 

American Investment* 

American Jewess - 

Am Stillen Meer 

Bureau of American Republics... 

Brooklyn Medical JoumaL 

California Poultry Keeper 

Conqueror • 

Citisen 

Consular Reports 

Der Techniker 

Land of Sunshine 

Pacific States 

Paradise of the Pacific 

Rural Califomian 

Southern California Practioner.. 
Tennessee University Magazine. 
Whittier 



BV4S<r./.^6- 



roRs . . 

RAKIAN 



iBrary 






EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Los Anoefes Pubfic Libru 



AND 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 



DECEMBER, 1896 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



DIRECTORS. 



GEO. H. BONBBRAKB, Pnsident. 
FRANK P. PUNT, OBO. H. STEWART, 

H. W. 0'MEI<VENY, H. E. STORRa 



COMMITTEES. 

Books and Donations, 
H. W. O'MBZ.vsmr, H. E. Storjls. 

Rules and Administration. 
H. W. O'MSLVBKY, H. E. Storks. 

Auditing and Accounts, 
Gbo. H. Stbwa&t, Prank P. "Bijart, 

/Anting and Sullies, 
Prank P. Fijnt, Gbo. H. Stbwart. 

Attendants, 
H. E. Storrs, Gbo. H. Stbwart. 



Mrs. C. B. Powi^BR, Clerk and Librarian. 
Anna D. Austin, Assistant Librarian. 

Attendants, 

Cbua Gi^sason, Mabel S. Ditnn, 

Neu^ib M. Russ, Blanche A. Putnam, 

BuzABBTH Fargo, Edith Moorb, 

Harriet Mercer, Pearl Gleason, 

Florence Thornburo, Mabelle Hand, 

Anna Beckley, Mabel Prentiss, 

Nora A. Miller, May Bennett,* 

Mary Johnson, Christine Clark,* 

Gertrude Darlow, Mae Blanchard,* 

CoRiNNE Wise, Jessie Youno,* 

Helen a. Neyin,* Georgia Horgan. 

* Added to the force aiace the last report. 



REPORT 

OF THB 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THB 



Los Angeles Public Library 

DECEMBER, 1896 



To the Honorable Council of the City of Los Angeles : 
Gentlbmbn : 

As required by the charter of this city, the Directors of the 
Los Angeles Public Library herewith present their annual report for 
the year ending November 30th, 1896. 

The year has been one of advance in all respects in the work 
intended to be accomplished by the library. For a detailed account 
of its present condition you are respectfully referred to the Librarian's 
report accompanying this communication. 

We are fortunate in being able to report that the system of 
conducting the library has been so well founded that the friction 
necessarily incident upon serving the public with practically free 
reading matter has been reduced to a minimum. 

The intelligent work of the Librarian and her assistants for the 
past year is worthy of commendation and demonstrates frilly the 
wisdom of continuing the same careftil system that has given the 
library the services of so capable a body of assistants. 

In accordance with this system, a class of six young ladies has 
been given, during the year, the benefits of a six months' training 
in the methods and work of the library, culminating in an examina- 
tion as to their qualification and adaptation to library work. They, 
in turn, have given their services for the same period free of charge. 
Some of these have received regular appointments as assistants and 
are rendering efficient service. This process of sifting out the appli- 
cants for positions in the library has much to commend it. A new 
class has just been started and will in due time, doubtless, afford 
well equipped recruits for our own or other libraries. 



4 REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

The two Rudolph indexers alluded to in our last report have 
been properly supplied with the information necessary to show the 
complete list of fiction contained in the library, and are so con- 
structed that with little labor the list will remain complete in 
alphabetical order and in such form as to be readily accessible to the 
public. 

So useful and practical have been the working of these indexers 
that the board has procured two additional ones that are now being 
put in readiness, covering all other books and pamphlets. 

It will be but a short time, in our opinion, when still others 
must be added to accommodate our rapidly growing lists. 

The board was much pleased with your assent to their petition 
that the rooms lately occupied by the Board of Education be 
assigned to the uses of the library. They are now in possession of 
the rooms and are having them properly fitted up for the relief of 
some of our overcrowded rooms. By your consent a doorway has 
been cut through into the hall adjoining the elevator shaft, which 
will enable us to use one of the rooms for the distribution of books 
to the public schools without interfering with the work of the refer- 
ence-room or other departments of the work. A partition has been 
removed thus enlarging the room, better adapting it to its purposes. 

The remaining room will be connected with the reference-room 
and thus render this important and rapidly growing branch of our 
work much more satisfactory. 

The installation of electric lighting into all the rooms devoted 
to library use has contributed largely to the comfort of patrons and 
the convenience of employes, the degree of illumination being satis- 
fiictory. The few occasions when inadequate light was available, 
undoubtedly due to the difficulties attending installation, impressed 
the board with the advisability of having a gas supply in reserve^ 
and same has been provided. 

A change has also been made by increasing the length of the 
counter available for public use, but this has been at the expense of 
the space allotted to the public for exchange of books. This space, 
especially at certain times in the day, is overcrowded, and it is 
almost impossible for the assistants to give to each the attention that 
should be given to the patrons of the library. 

It is a difficult and delicate task, with our present accommoda- 
tions, to so regulate this portion of our service as not to give ofiense 



I<08 ANGELBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 5 

to our older and more conservative patrons. It is certainly most 
desirable that that portion of the reading public which is interested in 
the more substantial books should not be crowded from their positions 
or be compelled to unduly wait for the attention to which they are 
entitled ; but without increased floor space we can find no satisfactory 
solution to the problem. This overcrowded condition undoubtedly 
keeps away entirely a most desirable clientage, and one from which 
the library might have much to expect for its ftiture growth. There 
is a large portion of our wealthier population who should be gener- 
ous donors, that have never given themselves the pleasure and the 
Ubrary the credit of making any examination of the work done and 
the opportunities afibrded by this attempt to supply the wants of the 
reading public. The history of libraries founded by the generosity 
of individuals is very instructive and suggestive. When and by 
what means the germ idea was planted in the minds of the donors 
no one, possibly not even themselves, can tell, but its fruitage is 
none the less beneficent. It is to be hoped that this apathy will 
cease and that as a result a library building with appliances worthy 
of the name may at an early day decorate our city and perpetuate 
the memory of its patron. 

As will be seen by the Librarian's report, the total circulation 
for the year has been 556,312, an increase over that of the preceding 
year of 14,855 volumes. 

The library has been managed during the last year at a minimum 
cost, the total expense for salaries being but $32.72 more than dur- 
ing the preceding year. This slight increase in connection with the 
number of books circulated during the same time is a good indica- 
tion that the Librarian and her assistants have not been neglectful 
of the interest intrusted to them. 

It will farther be noted that the class of books purchased has 
been of the more substantial sort, while it is to be regretted that 
so much of the attention of the reading public is given to fiction, it 
is nevertheless true that the class of fiction furnished has been of 
the better sort, and thus, perhaps, the public taste is being culti- 
vated in some degree. 

As to the future growth of the library, it must be borne in mind 
that no enterprise can long stand still. Advance or retrogression is 
a necessity for existence, but that advance must receive a check at 
an early day unless greater facilities are provided. The comparison 



6 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

with Other cities and the outlay of public funds for library purposes, 
compiled by the Librarian, shows how far Los Angeles is behind in 
this particular. The portion of the public revenue devoted to 
library purposes has been but 4 and 3-10 cents upon each $100.00 
of the assessed valuation for the past year. The full apportionment 
of 5 cents upon each $100.00 would give your board none too much 
for the constantly increasing needs and growth, and we would 
respectfully ask that your honorable body would give this matter 
your earnest consideration in its proper time. 

A much needed improvement, and one that cannot be much 
longer delayed, is a complete published catalog of all books and 
pamphlets, and all resources of the libraty. This should be so pub- 
lished as to be practically free, or at least at such nominal cost as 
will serve to secure its preservation. Without such a list the useful- 
ness of the library is abridged, and to all, aside from those in direct 
control, it becomes a mere heterogeneous collection of books from 
which one must draw at random, if at all. Such a catalog can 
easily be prepared when the Rudolph indexers are once in working 
order, but a considerable outlay of money will be necessary for its 
publication upon the proper terms. Some of these extra expendi- 
tures should be remembered in the allowance made for library uses. 

The board have in view also at an early day the establishment 
of an additional feature of the library in providing a department to 
be devoted to books relating to the history of Southern California, 
its resources and industries, and that it may be as complete as pos- 
sible, desire the cooperation of the public. Anyone having books 
or pamphlets relating to any of these topics is respectfully asked to 
make the library a depository of the same, and may rest assured 
that any gifts in these lines will be thoroughly appreciated and 
properly cared for. 

In conclusion, your board desires to express their thanks to Mrs. 
C. B. Fowler and her assistant, Miss Anna D. Austin, for their 
hearty cooperation and eflForts to carry out their wishes. The 
patience and untiring efforts of the attendants to serve the public 
under many disadvantages also deserve and are herewith tendered 
the hearty appreciation of the board. 
Very respectfully submitted, by order of the Board of Directors. 

Gbo. H. Bonbbrake, 

President. 



REPORT 



OF 



THE LIBRARIAN 



t895-'96. 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Library : 

Osntumbn: 

I beg leave to snfamit to you herewith, the Eighth Annual Report of the 
Librarian, a statement of the work of the Library from December i, 1895, to 
December i, 1896. 

The apportionment by the City Cooncil to the Library Fund for the 
cnrrent fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, was four and three-tenths cents on 
each one hundred dollars of the assessed value of all taxable property, 
amounting to about $23,464.00. Had we received the fall apportionment of 5 
cents per $100.00, the amount would have been $26,121.00 

The receipts and expenditures of the Library Fund for the past year are 
as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand from 1894-95 $ 5,141 31 

Balance apportionment, 1895-96 12,320 50 

Received on apportionment, 1896-97 8,122 73 

Ninety books lost and paid for 81 55 

Duplicate books and magazines sold 7 34 

Paper, paste, etc., sold 3 60 

Freight returned 29 85 

Dues 6 00 

Fines 1,246 73 

$26,959 61 



8 REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

EXPEKI>ITUBES. 

Books $3,544 93 

Periodical* 1,325 41 

Binding 2,324 71 

' 1 7,195 05 

25 lost books fonnd, money refunded 22 68 

Printing — 

Blank forms $175 50 

Annual report • 84 00 

$ 259 50 

Stationery and supplies ^ 383 00 

Sundries 324 89 

Postage 92 30 

Elalsomining , » 169 00 

Renovating 40 71 

Coal ^ 4 75 

Paid Board of Education for rooms, etc., for extenskm of Library..... 400 00 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

4 Rudolph Indexers $870 00 

Remington typewriter 100 00 

Wheels, etc., for Hammond 18 36 

Files and trays xz 25 

Gas fixtures 4 10 

Rug and linoleum 54 50 

Chain and stools » 28 00 

Shelving-stack and newspaper files 61 85 

Bags for school work 13 50 

$ 1,161 56 

Salaries 10,701 19 

Sunday and holiday service 298 40 

Janitors 680 00 

Balance 5,326 58 

$26,959 61 

SEICUBITT DEPOSITS, 1895-06. 

Receipts— 

Nov. 30, 1895. To balance $ 87 25 

1895-9(3. Deposits 315 60 

— $ 402 85 

Expenditure — 

1895-96. Deposits returned $327 60 

Nov. 30, 1896. By balance 75 25 

$ 402 85 

BOOKS. 

The number of volumes in the library on Dec. i, 1895, was.. 41,600 

Number of volumes added, to Dec. i, 1896 4>4i5 

46,015 

Worn out and discarded during the year 1,361 

I/)st and paid for 90 

1,451 

44,564 



IX)S ANGBLBS FUBUC LIBRARY 



CLASSIFIED CONTENTS OF THE CIBCUIiATING DE- 

FABfilENT. 



cuLsa. 



Philoeophj ^ 

Religion .^ 

Sodotogy 

Philology 

Natural Sciences 

UaefalAirts 

Pine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Biography 



VOLS. 



613 
1501 

1703 

256 

1566 

837 
729 

3514 

1839 
1682 

1587 



CI«ASS. 



lection 

Juvenile Piction^.... 

Music 

French 

German 

Spanish 

Italian 

Bound Periodicals 

Unbound and Donations. 

Plates, etc 

Pacific States 



Foreign 



VOLS. 



9986 
2904 

834 
1496 

960 

1124 

1 150 

303 



CLASSIFIED CONTENTS OF THE BEFEBENCE-BOOM, 



CLASS. 



Bibliography and) 
Encyclopedias.. ) 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Natural Science .... 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Sociology 

Philology 




CLASS' 



Biogpraphy 

Fiction 

German 

Spanish 

U. S. Public Documents. 
Unbound Pamphlets....... 

California Documents. ... 

Maps and Atlases 

Bound Periodicals 



VOLS. 



117 

2 

2 

22 

4133 
490 

245 
114 

3508 



The amount received from taxes for the year 1895-96 was $21,785.87; 
from the rate for this year, the amount will be about $22,464.00, or $679.00 
more than last year. While the amount received from the city is not increas- 
ing to any extent, the work of the library is. New books are needed more 
than ever, as the number of old and worn-out books being discarded, is in- 
creasing. The number of books discarded in 1894-95 was 515 ; for the year 
1895-96, 145 If nearly three times as many, and 32.8% of the number of new 
books added. 

The following classes have received special additions during the year : 
Electricity, Botany, Physiology, Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Ethnology. 

Of the $3,544.93 spent for books, at least $875.00, or 25% was spent to 
replace worn out juvenile and adult fiction. 

The following are some of the principal authors whose works have had to 
be replaced : Cooper, Stowe, Dickens, Besant, Lever, Black, Hale, Hardy, 
Weyman, Bunner, Stockton, Doyle, Buraham, Scott, Geo. Bliot, King, Lyall, 
Caine, Hope, Davis, Barr, Alger, Adams, Alcott, Sidney, Munroe, Wiggin, 
Castleman, Ballantyne, Bllis, Fenn, Aldrich, Elingsley, Perry, Trowbridge and 
many others. 

Of the discarded books and old magazines, part have been distributed to 
the Jail and Hospital, others have been sent to the County Farm and News- 
boys' Home. 



lO 



REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 



REGISTRATION. 

Total membership December i, 1895, was 22,223 ; on December z, 1896, it 
was 26,567, an increase of 4,344. 

Total registration for the year was 4727, of this 2024 were men and 2705 
were women. 

Nnmber of withdrawals was 682 ; renewals, 299. 

Numbers of changes in addresses, 3,355. 

CIRCULATING DEPARTMENT. 

This department was open 302 days during the past year. 
The number of volumes drawn for home use was, 388,756. 
Daily average circulation 1287 ; for year 1894-95 was 1227. 
Classified circulation for the year is contained in the following table : 

CLASSIFIED CIRCULATION. 



CI^ASS. 



Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology „ 

Natural Science... 

Useful Arts 

Pine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Biography 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

Music 

Fiction 

Juvenile 

Bound Magazines 

Magazines 

Plates 



Reference-room Readers 




497,615 
58,697 

556,3" 



Of the classess Sociology Philology, Natural Science, Useful Arts, Litera- 
ture and Music show the most marked increase in circulation* 

Reference-room readers for 1894-95, 51,216 ; for 1895-6, 58,697, an increase 

of 7,481. 

The amount received for fines $1,246.73. For last year, $1237.04. 



LOS ANGKLES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



II 



TABLE SHOWING CIBCULATION 

By Uu Month far the Year 1895-96. 



MONTH. 



December 
January ... 
Fcbrmuy.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October ..., 
November , 

Totals ... 



Home. 



28,909 
32,242 
30,298 
32,416 
29,708 

3o»832 
29,920 

31,559 
36,785 
35,128 

37,207 
33,752 




LlbxBry. 


Ref.Rooni 


ToUl. 


9,876 


5,509 


44,294 


".293 


7.595 


51.130 


9»474 


4,710 


44,482 


10,790 


4.923 


48.129 


9,868 


4,095 


43>67i 


10,462 


3.836 


45,130 


10,361 


4.I19 


44,400 


8,135 


4,081 


43.775 


7.666 


3.293 


47.744 


7,002 


5,146 


47.276 


6,917 


5,655 


49,779 


7,015 


5.735 


46,502 


108,859 


58,697 


556,312 



Av. Home 

Use 
Per Day. 

1,156 
1,240 

1,254 

1,251 

1,236 

I.185 

1,151 
1,262 

1.469 

1,405 
1,316 

1,467 



Comparison of the circulation of the Los Angeles Public Library with that 
of libraries in some of the large cities for the year 1895: 

Last year the libraries of New York city circulated something over a mil- 
lion of volumes, and received a total appropriation from the city of $65,000. 

The Boston Public Library circulated 850,000 volumes, and received 
|i 75,000 from the city. 

The Chicago Public Library circulated 1,150,000 volumes, and received 
$i24,ooa 

The Cleveland Public Library circulated 595,000 volumes, and received 
$60,000. 

The St. Louis Public Library circulated 331,000 volumes, and received 
f6o,ooo. 

The Los Angeles Public Library circulated for the same year, 541,457 
volumes, and received (21,600. 

By comparing these figures, we find that the Los Angeles Library circu- 
lated about half as many books as the New York Libraries, and received less 
than one-third the money from the city ; more than 63^ % as many books as 
the Boston Library, and received about one-eighth the money ; over 47% as 
many books as circulated by the Chicago Library on a little more than one- 
sixth the money. 

The Cleveland Public Library circulated about 53,000 more volumes than 
the Los Angeles on nearly three times the money. 

St. Louis circulated 210,557 volumes less than Los Angeles, and received 
138,400 more money. 

In New York city the maximum rate to be received from the city is ten 
cents for each volume circulated. Had this library received that amount for 
its circulation of 541,457 volumes for last year, the new books added this year» 
would have been something of which to be proud. 



12 



REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 



By having so much larger appropriations, these Eastern libraries are 
enabled to establish branch libraries, delivery stations, to bay more valuable 
and greater number of books, to employ more help and to pay higher salaries. 

lilBBABT AND SCHOOLS. 

TABI«B OF SCHOOI, 8TA.TISTICS FOR 1895-96. 



December, 1895 
January, 1896... 

February 

March 

April 

May 

September 

October 

November 



KO. OF 
DBLIVSRIBS. 


BOOKS. 


3 


2057 


4 
3 


2429 
1870 


5 
4 


3179 
3600 


3 


2320 


I 
4 


414 
2581 


4 


3170 



31 



20630 



This would make an average of 665 books delivered each week, or 2291 
each month to the schools during the school year. Last year the number of 
books circulated was 17,416, making the increase this 3rear 3204, although the 
number of books for each teacher has been limited to 15, on account of having 
to keep a good selection of juvenile books for general circulation. 

The number of teachers in the city is 414 ; last year the number drawing 
books was 200, this year it is 351. 

The classes most used in the school work, besides Juvenile fiction, in the 
the order of their use, are : Natural Sciences, Travels, Literature, History and 
Biography. 

The total circulation of the classes was 8798, of the adult and juvenile 
fiction 8249, bound and unbound magazines and plates 3573. 

While the use of juvenile fiction may seem large, it is due to a great extent 
to the fact that many of these books are for the younger pupils, as books 
have to be selected for them which can be read to them and will interest them 
until they are old enough to read understandingly for themselves. 

Only the best fiction is selected, books from which the children gain a 
great deal of useful information while they are being amused. 

The aim of the teachers in selecting their books is to choose those bearing 
on the subject being studied by the pupils, which will not only increase their 
interest in their work, but greatly extend their knowledge. There never was 
a time when so many books were written and at the command of the teachers, 
with which to interest even the youngest children in their studies. 

Take, for instance, American History Stories, Leaves from Nature's Story 
Book, Flower Polk, Storyland of Stars, Fairyland of Flowers, Wright's Nature 
Readers, Johonnot series. Stories of Industry ; what could be better or more 
nstructive ? Of the Stories of Industry, Wm. K. Anderson, Superintendent 



I^OS ANGBI^KS PUBLIC UBRARY 1 3 

of Milwaukee schools, has the following to say : "These are, in my opinion, 
nnsorpassed for the porpose of supplementary reading and to impart a knowl- 
edge of modem industries. I have witnessed no effort so snccessfnl as this to 
combine the practice of reading and training in reading with the getting of 
nseful knowledge." The library has a limited number of copies of these and 
other books of the same kind, but is adding to them as fast as the demand for 
them increases and funds will permit. The teachers are doing good work in 
helping the school children to become acquainted with the best kinds of 
literature. 

The amount of money received from the Board of Education and expended 
for books for the school work was I744.21 . With this money 700 yolumes have 
been purchased, while the teachers have had the use of at least 20,000 volumes 
from the library. 

BEADING-ROOM. 

Number of periodicals on file in the library for the past year was 456 ; 183 
of these were for home circulation. 

The number of visitors to the Reading-rooms during the past year was 
79,445, or 12,615 more than 1894-95. Of the Sunday visitors, 4666 were men, 
1550 women, and 717 children. 

The amount expended for periodicals was $132541. 

Periodicals added during 1896 : 

American Historical Review, Public Libraries, 

American Historical Register, Progress, 

Berkeley Magazine, Denver Evening Post, 

Cosmopolis, Diplomatic and Consular Review, 

Inland Printer, Railroad Gazette. 

Lotos, 

REFBBENGE-BOOM. 

During the past year 58,697 students used the Reference department. 
This is an increase of 7500 over 1894-95, and these figures would have been 
materially increased could the department have accommodated more people. 
At times it has been impossible to seat all the patrons and the room is often so 
crowded that its purpose as a place for study is defeated. One of the rooms 
lately vacated by the Board of Education will be used to relieve the pressure, 
both in book room and seating capacity ; and will also be reserved as a class- 
room whenever desired by teachers or clubs. 

544 books were added, among which are the following : 

Woole Fresh Water Algae. 

Browning Americana. 

Preshfield and Sellor Caucasus. 

Hooker and Jackson Index Kewensis. 

Hamerton French Painters. 

Finley Greece. 

Flory Book about Fans. 

Muther History of Modem Painting. 

Cole and Stillman. Old Italian Masters. 



14 REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Michel ^ Rembrandt, His Life and His Time. 

Schreiber ^ Atlas of Classical Antiquities. 

Perrot and Chipiez History of Art in Primitive Greece. 

Wedmore Etching in England. 

Tnckerman, Bd The Five Orders of Architecture According to 

Giacomo Barozzio of Vignola. 

Longfellow, W. P Bncyclopsedia of Architecture in Italy, Greece 

and the Levant. 

Goury and Jones Alhambra. 

Harris Fishes of North America. 

The following works on electricity have also been added to the Reference- 
room: 

Flather Dynamometers and the Measurement of Power. 

Atkinson ^ Elements of Static Electricity. 

Webb Testing of Insulated Wires and Cables. 

AUsop Telephones. 

Latimer Incandescent Lighting. 

Fleming Alternate Current Transformer. 

Cox Dynamos and Motors. 

Urquhart Dynamo Construction. 

Plants Storage of Electrical Energy. 

Brunor Practical Electroplater. 

Haskins Galvanometer. 

Davis Standard Tables. 

Houston Electricity and Magnetism. 

Thurston Stationary Steam-engines for Electrical Light- 
ing Purposes. 

Atkinson Electrical Transmission of Power. 

Electrical Trades Directory and Handbook. 

CATALOGING D£PARTMENT. 

The two Rudolph Indezers purchased last year have made possible a com- 
plete author and subject list of fiction, and into the two indexers just added is 
being placed the dictionary catalog of the remaining classes. 

This completed, there will be available to the public, for the first time, a 
complete dictionary catalog of the contents of the library ; but this will not 
satisfy the demand for printed lists which may be taken home, thus obviating 
the 'necessity of making book lists in the crowd that fills the delivery-room 
during the greater part of the day. 

Useful Arts and Fine Arts have been added to the card catalog during 
the year ; in addition, the six classes cataloged have been rewritten for the 
indexer. 

The services of a cataloger for three hours per day has been added to the 
previous force ; but on account of the growth of the work and the need of 
more help in every department of the library, the cataloging department 
sufiers by being called upon to perform much work entirely without its 
province. 

Cost of four indezers, $870.00. 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 1 5 

ADMINISTRATION. 

During the past year four attendants have resigned from the library sta£P, 
their places being filled from the Training-Class graduates. 

There have been seven promotions and five appointments to the staff, 
which now numbers twenty-four, including librarian and assistant. 

The amount paid for salaries was 110,701.19 ; for janitors, $680 ; for Sun- 
day and holiday services, $29840. While the work has materially increased, 
not only in the circulating but in all other departments as well, including the 
mere manual care of the books, the force has been so distributed that but one 
more attendant has been employed, the services of an additional janitor have 
been secured, and the salaries for 1895-96 have exceeded those of 1894-95 by 

only $32.72. 

BINDBBY AND BEPAIBS. 

Number of books and magazines sent to the bindery was 5,958. 

Number of books repaired in the work-room by the regular employes was 
28,340. 

Notices sent, 7,119. 

Cost of binding, $2,324.71 — ^$425.36 more than was spent for it last year, 
showing how much faster the books are wearing out. 

IN GENEBAIi. 

By an expenditure of $400, the rooms occupied by the Board of Education 
have been obtained for the use of the library. A number of changes in remov- 
ing partitions and cutting a new door through to the main hall, so as to make 
every foot of space available, have been completed. 

The rooms are rapidly being but in shape, and will certainly be ready for 
the public by the first of the year. 

One room next to the Reference department will be used in connection 
with it for students wishing to do special work away from the unavoidable 
crowding and confusion of the main room. It can also be used as a special 
class-room by teachers desiring to bring pupils to the library for special refer- 
ence work. Quite an additional amount of shelving is added to the Reference 
department with this room. 

The other room is being fitted up specially for a Juvenile department and 
reading-room. All Juvenile literature will be placed in this room, and the 
children will have access to the shelves. While the room is not as large as 
could be wished, it will make a good start for the children's department until 
the library has more commodious quarters. 

By the removal of the Juvenile books from the main circulating depart- 
ment, the crowded condition of the shelves there will be relieved. 

This new department will also offer better facilities for teachers to make 
their selections for school work. Books on pedagogy will be placed in this 
room for the convenience of the teachers. 

What the library needs more than an3rthing else, except a new building of 
its own, is a finding list up to date, and gotten out as soon as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. B. Fowler, Libcarimn. 



i6 



REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS 



DONATIONS. 

DAILY PUBLICATIONS. 



Arizona Citizen. 
Lob Angeles BzpreM, 3 copies. 
Los Angeles Herald, 2 copies. 
Los Angeles Jonmal, i copy. 
Los Angeles, Record, 3 copies. 
Los Angeles Times, 2 copies. 



Omaha Bee. 
Pasadena News. 
Sacramento Bee. 
Sacramento Record Union. 
San Prandsco Call. 
Tombstone Prospector. 



WEEKLY PUBLICATIONS. 



American Sentinel. 

California Civic Review. 

California Independent. 

California Volksfreund. 

Capital. 

Catholic Tidings. 

Catholic Review. 

Citrograph. 

Germania. 

Investor. 

La Caceta. 

La Union. 

Las dos Republicas. 

Le Progres. 



L'Union Noavelle. 

Los Angeles Sunday World. 

Lower Califomian. 

Manufacturer. 

Mildura Cultivator. 

Mount Lowe Echo. 

National Single Taxer. 

Railroad Record. 

San Bernardino Saturday Review*. 

Southwest News. 

Sud California Post. 

Tulare Register. 

Le Francais. 



MONTHLY PUBLICATIONS. 



Altrurian. 

American Jewess. 

Am StiUen Meer. 

Brooklyn Medical Journal. 

California Poultry Keeper. 

Citizen. 

Engineers' Review. 



Illustrated Africa. 

Land of Sunshine. 

Paradise of the Pacific. 

Rural Califomian. 

Southern California Practioner. 

Tennessee Magazine. 

Wellesley Magazine. 



UM ANGBLBS FXJBUC I.IBKABT 
BOOKS AND FAMPHUSTS. 





1 






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REPORT OP BOARD OP DIRacTOSS 
BOOKS AND PAMPHI,BTS— Continned. 



Rleby, N. L - 

Uln, epnrwon V 

Ruddy, nia GOf. 

Salon T. I, 

BUI Diego Free P. L. 
Sui Fnindaco McTcu 
Ban Fimndsco P. I_... 

Scranton P. I.. 

Bbilun, Mew Mexkn 

Slmnu, Dr. J 

SmlthwiDlan InMltutc 

Bpiliigfletd, UwiiV.'ci 
Bpriiufield. Ohio, P. I 

St GSirBe. P. L 

St. LouU Piee P. I.... 

St. Paul's P, I, _,.,. 

Bicwiit, W. H., L.A. 

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ToroQlo P. I~.__.... 

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V. B. Bnran of Bdm 



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B V4-:^ 9^r^o 



^•i. 



Los Angeles Piublic Library 



H^ 



Annual Report 



of the 



Board of Directors 



and 



Librarian 

For the Year 
1897 



^^J 






1 






•i^' 



T^I--. 






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I 




. .>v^ 










ANNUAL REPORT 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



LOS ANGELES 



Public Library 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN 



December^ iSgj. 



Los Angeles Public Library 



DIRECTORS. 

Isidore B. Dockwkii<9R, J^sidenL 
W. M. Garland, Vice President, 
Ernbst K. Foster, Secretary. 
Wm. p. Burbank. 
Barl Rogers. 



COMMITTEES. 

Attendants: Eari* Rogers, Ernest K. Poster. 
Auditing and Accounts: W. M. Garland, Wm. P. Burbank. 
Books and Donations: Ernest K. Poster, Earl Rogers. 
Printing and Supplies: Wm. P. Burbank, Earl Rogers. 
Pules and Administration: Wm. P. Burbank, W. M. Garland. 
The President is a member of each Committee. 



Harriet Child Wadleigh, ClerJk and Librarian. 

Anna D. Austin. 
Celia Gleason, 






Assistant Librarians. 



Attendants. 

Nellie m. Russ, 
Elizabeth Fargo, 

CORRINE WiSEi 

Nora Miller, 
Florence Thornburg, 
Helen A. Nevin, 
Gertrude Darlow, 
Blanche Putnam, 
Anna Beckley, 
Mabel S. Dunn, 
Mary Johnson, 



Pearl E. Gleason, 
Edith Moore, 
Georgia Horgan, 
Mabelle Hand, 
Mabel Prentiss, 
Mamie Bennett, 
Christine Clark, 
Mae Blanchard, 
Jessie Young, 
May Keach, 
Rose Eberhart. 



'H 



7)o^ ^^ 



<iM 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Directors 



OP THK 



Los Angeles Public Library 



DBCBMBER 13, 1897. 



The Fnture. 



Important 
Chances. 



The Worth of 



To the Honorable the City Council of the City of Los Angeles: 

GbnTi^bmbn : — The Board of Directors of the Los Angeles 
Public Library has the honor to submit to your Honorable Body its 
annual report in accordance with the provisions of the city charter. 

In doing this we are glad to indulge the belief that the impor- 
tance and beneficial effects of this department of the city are highly 
appreciated by our fellow citizens and we are pleased to express 
the hope that you will consider carefully the particular needs of 
the library and by your foresight enable us to provide for its suc- 
cessful work and its certain requirements. 

The most important change which has been made in recent 
years is that of giving the public personal access to nearly all 
classes of books. That this has met with the favor of students and 
investigators as well as the general public it is hardly necessary to 
mention. Connected with plan of free access are, however, some 
risks and disadvantages, but we think they will be overbalanced by 
good results ; in this regard our short experience does not now 
permit of positive assertion. Another important change is the 
selection of a new librarian, Mrs. H. C. Wadleigh, who assumed 
charge on the i6th of June last, and whose administration 
promises to be very successful. 

The value of books is in the diligent reading thereof. To get 
the public familiar with the best books in all departments of liter- 
ature and science is the province of a public library. To those who 
have been deprived of the opportunities of school and college, we 



LOS ANGBI^BS FUBI^IC LIBRARY. 



An I&^lting 
Ilace. 



Future NcedB. 



The Best Books 



famish the best Substitute, and for those who hold diplomas we 
provide the means whereby they may keep abreast of advancement 
and prosecute their studies with greater satisfaction and com- 
pleter results. Our open access system enables our people to get 
much better acquainted with books, and, in helping them to study 
a question in its different phases, tends to prevent one-sided 
views and narrow, harmful judgments. A greater charity of 
opinion, a smaller egotism of learning, may be expected to result. 

It has been an object of the present board to make the library 
more inviting. To this end we have endeavored to beautify our 
walls with pictures and sought in potted plants such adornments 
as become a home. This has been done as far as space and limited 
means permitted; and we hope to make still more inviting this 
adjunct of our educational system. 

The library has long been cramped for room, and in spite of 
the fact that it now occupies the whole upper floor and attic of the 
city hall, the plan of the building does not permit the best use 
of the space, nor does it enable us to place books to the best 
advantage. In our re-arrangement we have done the best we 
could under the circumstances ; we have utilized one corridor and 
part of another and so disposed of other space that we have about 
ten per cent more floor space than formerly. 

But little more is possible in our present location, and, as Los 
Angeles continues to grow and as good books shall crowd our 
shelves, there is a certainty that the only good way out of a 
difficulty that is always present and is sure to be more and more 
pressing is the erection of a building specially designed for libraiy 
use. We are glad to state that some of our citizens stand ready to 
donate $1000 each, provided a sufficient number of others shall do 
likewise. Meanwhile, we realize to our sorrow that other cities 
of far less prominence and importance possess library buildings 
which mark either the general favor of the people or the well 
directed result of private benefaction. 

Realizing that the expenditure of public money is justifiable 
for libraries, as in the case of schools, on the theory that in the 
diffusion of knowledge, the advance of culture, the stimulation 
which comes from the best thoughts of the human intellect in all 
ages, the state secures a main source of its strength and a 
guarantee of its stability in the making of better citizens, we feel 
it our province to secure the best books attainable in the several 
departments and to discard such as appear worthless or bad in 
their influence. To this end the board has ceased the purchase of 
inferior fiction and has strengthened the other departments, 
wherein they seemed to be deficient 



RBPORT OP BOARD OP DIRECTORS. 



Fordcn Books. 



Alfibnryfor 



DoiuitioiM. 



The Merit 



The board has also made more complete and attractive its 
collection of foreign books. In this way we hope to make the 
library useful to those of our citizens who were bom abroad and 
desire to partake uf knowledge in the language with which they 
are most familiar. Most of these new books have been purchased 
also with this idea : that they will afford to students of other 
languages and literatures the books which will be most advan- 
tageous. 

We ask the council and our people generally to realize that this 
is the only library within hundreds of miles where questions of 
various kinds may be well studied. Nor is this likely to be other- 
wise. The need of making this a first-class reference library is 
thus readily apparent. It should be made more and more adapted 
to this requirement. The investigator of special questions, the 
student of local or general history, the learned scholar, the lover 
of science and fine arts, should find here the wealth of knowledge 
which may be a mine productive of great value to himself and the 
community. 

This library was formerly the recipient of more gifts than in 
recent years. We ask for this library more thoughtful considera- 
tion and beneficent attention. Some of the rarest and most 
valuable books in the library have come to us from private 
sources. More books, documents, pictures and the like would be 
very acceptable, and a good place can be found for busts, statues 
and memorial collections. Nearly all libraries are recipients of 
benefactions; our own much less than others, we regret to say. 
The only bust donated to the library is one of Goethe, given by 
Mr. Frederick W. Blanchard. A dozen more would add greatly 
to the appearance of our rooms. 

Under the open access system there is less need of a printed 
catalog. In each classified department there is now a complete 
typewritten list of books so that one may readily see all we have 
on a given subject — ^those that are on our shelves and those that 
are in readers' hands. Readers are requested to get more familiar 
with the library by consulting its rules and by questioning the 
attendants. 

A list of history, biography and travels has this year been 
published for general circulation. 

The library employees are under civil service rules and any 
classification of them hereafter will be on the score of actual 
merit. An attendant whose capacity lies dormant cannot expect 
promotion ; regard will be had to her improvement in knowledge, 
assiduous attention, manners, and a kindly and helpful considera- 
tion of readers' wants. Attendants are expected to aid those who 



X«OS A19GELBS FUBI4C I,IBRA&Y. 



Claims of the 
Ifibnry. 



Choosiiig 14- 
brmric*. 



New Books. 



8elfKdncation. 



▲cknowlcdg- 
ments. 



wish instruction in the use of books and to be able to select books 
adapted to the requirements of readers. Those who cannot do 
this have no claim for retention. 

There are no large libraries doing so much work on so little 
money. There is actual need of more liberal appropriations if we 
would keep pace with the rapid growth of Los Angeles and adapt 
its work to a large and intelligent community. We ask the public 
to regard this library as its own, to feel interested in it and be 
proud of it, to consider that any loss or damage to books is its own 
loss. We also desire our people to be helpful to the management 
in whatsoever way they can. Six years ago when the library had 
less than half the present number of volumes and when the 
circulation was far less, the money supply was quite as large as 
now. The public and their accredited agents in the city council 
are requested to give these statements their careful attention. 

The library affords special facilities to persons who desire to 
collect private libraries and the librarian will willingly aid with 
advice, suggestions and book lists, any person who may wish to 
know what are the best books on any subject. 

The names and authors of all books published in this country 
and England are accessible at all times. Prices of books can also be 
readily quoted. 

Among the new books are several on mining, milling, pros- 
pecting, irrigation, agriculture, forestry and other practical 
branches. The list of books on sociology and political science 
has been enlarged and on monetary science the best books in the 
language have been secured. It is especially desired that books 
about California or books by Califomians shall be added, and, as 
many of these are out of print, we desire the assistance of those 
who possess them. 

To those who must rely on their own efforts to secure an edu- 
cation the library hopes to be especially val uable . The student who 
cannot afford a teacher may expect here to get advice and to study 
those books which will smooth his road to the different depart- 
ments of knowledge. In this way a public library best does that 
work which more fortunate individuals secure from the schools 
and colleges. 

We express herewith our appreciation of the local press for 
frequent notices, the criticisms of intelligent readers, the sug- 
gestions of friends, the assistance given by specialists in reviewing 
certain sections of the library, to the council for its aid, and to the 
whole library force for assiduous work. The gift of I500, from the 
late Dr. Edgar, is acknowledged with the hope that it may inspire 
others to follow his worthy example. 



USPO&T OF BOAKD OF DIKBCTORS. 



Blsewhere will be found the librarian's report together with 
statistics showing the work of this institntion, the names of 
attendants, the circulation of books, etc., to all which we invite 
the kindly attention of the honorable council and the public 
whom we serve. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Isidore B. Dockwbh^Sr, 
W. M. Ga&i^nd, 

WiIJ:JAM p. BURBAIVK, 

Baki, Rogsrs, 
b&nbst k. f08ts&. 



8 I^OS ANGSZ.TO PUBIfIC I^IBSARY. 



Report of Librarian^ 

1896-97. 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles IMlic Library: 

Gknti,kicsn : — I have the honor to submit the ninth annual 
report of the work and condition of the Los Anji^eles Public 
Library, covering the year ending November 30, 1897. 

The city council apportioned to the library fund for the cur- 
rent fiscal year ending June 30, 1898, the sum of $18,809.71, being 
a levy of three and two-tenths cents on each one hundred dollars 
of the assessed value of all taxable property. The maximum limit 
fixed by the city charter allows a levy of five cents on each one 
hundred dollars of the assessed valuation of the city's taxable 
property, and would have given the library this year about $29,000 
over and above the balance on hand from last year's apportionment. 

The receipts and expenditures of the library fund for the past 
year have been as follows : 

RBCBIPTS. 

Cash on hand from 1895-96 | 5i336 58 

Balance apportionment 1896-97 I3i36i 60 

Received on apportionment 1897-98 9,472 00 

Books lost and paid for (82) 78 33 

Duplicate books, etc., sold 8 67 

Paper, paste, etc., sold 4 85 

Duplicate demand canceled ,.. 8 50 

Dues 12 00 

Fines 966 17 

I29.138 70 



REPORT OF UBRARIAN. 



EXPENDITURES. 

Books f4,394 95 

Periodicals ii405 27 

Binding 2,062 65 

$7,862 87 

Lost books returned and money refunded.... 21 13 

Stationery and supplies 457 94 

Sundries 417 81 

Postage 140 89 

Printing — 

Blank forms |i88 63 

Annual report 65 00 



Reorganizing and renovating — 

Contracts, cabinetwork and carpentering $706 90 

Contract for newspaper room, attic 1 35 00 

Electric work 112 75 

Painting and kalsomining 239 50 

Extra service, cleaning and moving 

books 57 94 

Plumbing 3 50 



253 63 



Furniture and fixtures — 

New stacks 348 21 

Pictures and framing 112 40 

Desks, tables and chairs 123 30 

Carpets, linoleums, etc 234 90 

Resurfacing and finishing old furniture... 82 30 

Card trays 12 00 



1,255 59 



913 II 



Salaries 11,^99 39 

Sunday and holiday service 250 40 

Janitors 720 00 

12,669 ^ 

Balance i 5,146 04 

129,138 70 



lo LOS angei.es public library. 

DEPOSITS. 

Receipts — 

Nov. 30, 1896 To balance $ 75 25 

1896-97 Deposits 362 85 

$438 10 

Expenditures — 

1896-97 By deposits returned I307 85 

Nov. 30, 1897 By balance 130 25 

BOOKS. 

Number of volumes in library Dec i, 1896 44>564 

Number added to Dec. i, 1897... 4f952 



Books discarded during the year 1297 

Books lost and paid for . 82 



49»5i6 



1,379 



Books in library December i, 1897 48,145 



CIRCULATION. 

The increase in circulation the past twelve months has not 
been as great as in certain other years — only about two and one- 
half per cent. The limitations of the present quarters prohibit 
the extension of the privileges of the library to any appreciable 
degree. The changes made in September gave more ease to 
readers and to workers ; no floor space can be actually added to 
the building. 

From January 25, 1896, to August 9, 1897, books were circulated 
at Casa de Castelar, the home of the Los Angeles Settlements Asso- 
ciation, under the rules governing the circulation through the 
public schools. 

The necessary room and light were furnished by the asso- 
ciation, and the service required in the exchange and care of the 
books was voluntary. 

At the end of the first year 602 books had circulated to 65 
homes ; 25 per cent of these books were in the Spanish language, 
8 per cent in French, 3 per cent in Italian, 34.9 per cent were 
juvenile, 12.2 per cent adult fiction and the remainder travels, 
history and science. This was considered sufficient evidence of 
the usefulness of the work to justify its permanency. To this end, 



RBPORT OP LIBRARIAN. II 



-on August 9, the board of directors of the library provided for 
the assignment of an attendant to issue cards and exchange books 
at this point one evening of each week. 

The members of the association have done much to aid library 
extension in this neighborhood composed largely of a foreign and 
non-reading people. An average of 25 books is circulated each 
week. 

The general work of the year is represented by the tables 
appended. 

REGISTRATION. 

There has been an addition of 4,890 new members during the 
year, of whom 2,045 were men, and 2,845 were women. This 
•department has sent out 7,897 notices to card holders, concerning 
the expiration of cards, and the clerical work has also been aug- 
mented by the change of address in the case of 4,149 readers. 
There has been a total registration of card holders since 1889 of 
35,693, of whom 14,912 were men and 20,781 were women. 

SCHOOLS AND LIBRARY. 

The aid which this library has for years been giving to the 
schools through the circulation of books to teachers for the use of 
pupils has been set forth annually. 

The present year has seen a growth in this circulation and the 
growth has been partially met by the expenditure of such school 
money as was set aside for that purpose. We have not been able 
however to supply fully the demands; especially is this the 
case with books necessary for science work and history. The 
amount expended in the school department does not increase with 
the growth of the city schools. 

The re-organizing of the library gave a much better location 
for the school and juvenile work. These two departments were 
placed in the room formerly used for the reference room, at the 
east end of the corridor. There is now facility for teachers to 
bring classes to be instructed in the use of the library and to learn 
the position and classification of the books. This advantage has 
already been recognized and adopted by some progressive teachers 
and requests for the use of a table for an afternoon have come 
from several others. 

The present plan and aim, to duplicate in this room many 
standard works in history and literature, as well as many works 
of reference, so that the school department may be rightfully 
termed a '* School Reference Room,'' meets one of the most urgent 
needs of our library. 



12 I<OS ANGBI«HS PUBI^IC I.IBRARY. 

The greatest possibilities are open to this method of supple- 
menting the school work by stimulating voluntary efforts on the 
part of the pupils to find at the library helpful and interesting 
books on their daily lessons. The companionship of books can 



REFERENCE ROOM. 

The activity in this department has been carried along in the 
same lines as in former years. Students in every line come for 
aid and, we believe, with invariable success — ^the only exceptions 
being those who are seeking knowledge to be found only in the 
library of a specialist. The schools, the study classes, and the 
general searcher continue to appreciate our reference room, if one 
may judge by increasing numbers. 

The following list contains those books of especial value 
added during the year. 



Books op Spbciai, Vaxxtb for Rbpbrencb Addbd during 

THB YBAR. 

Marshall Christian Missions. 

Thwaites Jesuit Relations and the Allied Documents. 

(8 vols, at present date.) 

Palgrave Dictionary of Political Economy. (2 vols, at 

present date.) 
Civil Service Guide. 

Pemald English Synonyms, Antonyms and Prepo- 
sitions. 

Salva Diccionarie Frances - Espafiol y Espafiol- 

Prances. 

Reclus Physical Geography. (2 vols.) 

Griffith Palms of British East India. 

Drury Useful Plants of India. 

Harvey Flora Capensis. 

Hildebrand Flora of the Hawaiian Islands. 

Sargent Silva of North America. Vol. 10. (Special 

value of this volume lies in the beautiful 
plates and descriptions of the Yuccas.) 

Bolus Orchids of the Cape Peninsula. 

Spon Workshop Receipts. 

Baillon Natural History of Plants. (8 vols.) 

Robinson Hydraulic Machinery. 

Francis Lowell Hydraulic Experiments. 

Rothwell Mineral Industry for 1896. 



REPORT OP I<IBRARIAN. I3 

Poster Text Book of Ore and Stone Mining. 

Redwood Petroleum. (2 vols.) 

Rose Metallurgy of Gold. 

Scott .Text Book of Farm Engineering. 

Bom Outlines of Modern Farming. 

Jewitt Ceramic Art of Great Britain. 

Hojt Cyclopedia of English and Latin Quotations. 

Christy Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of all Ages. 

Warner Library of the World's Best Literature. (20 vols. 

up to date.) 

Reid Concordance to Bums. 

De Quincey Works. (14 vols.) 

Maspero Dawn of Civilization and Struggle of the 

Nations. 

Burgeois The Century of Louis XIV. 

Lacroix The Eighteenth Century. 

Hittell History of California. (4 vols.) 

Pacific Coast Directory for 1897-98. 

Peck ..Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. 

Sey ifert Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. 

Tsountas Myconean Age. 

Clark Concise History of Knighthood. (2 vols.) 

Hinman Puritan Settlers. 

Savage Genealogical Dictionary of New England. 

Index to American Genealogy. 

Special bibliographies made out in the reference room in the 
past year : 

Alaska; Capital punishment; Chaldea, Assyria and Baby- 
lonia ; Child study (Fancy, imagination and reason in the child) ; 
Chinese literature ; Seven cities of Cibola and the Zuni Indians ; 
Charles A. Dana; Henry George; Guilds; Hawaii; Homer; 
Japanese literature ; Journalism ; Municipal reform ; Nansen ; 
Pasteur and hydrophobia ; Thanksgiving ; U. S. Navy ; U. S. 
Army ; Women. 

The special bibliographies prepared by pupils have included : 

Boers and the Transvaal ; Crete ; U. S. Navy ; Polar explora- 
tion ; Polish literature ; Barrie ; Caine ; Guiney ; Holmes ; Inger- 
soil ; Irving ; Lincoln ; Maeterlinck ; Napoleon ; Stevenson ; 
Stoddard ; Watson ; Pre-Raphaelitism ; Spanish life. 

Short lists are always made out for those who wish material 
on special subjects and an e£fort is made to keep material on hand 
for current topics. 

The reference assistants have been given charge of the 
public documents ; the intention is to complete broken sets and to 



14 l/yS ANGEI.BS PUBLIC UBRAR^. 

catalog them. At the present date the agricultural department 
and a portion of the Geological Surveys publications are ready for 

use. 

CATALOOINQ* 

A dictionary card catalog has been made during the year for 
natural sciences and the classes found in the reference room. 
These cards together with those for useful and fine arts made last 
year will be filed into the alphabetical card catalog of history and 
literature already in use. This card catalog represents work done 
at intervals for six years past and is undergoing a complete revision 
so that it will be correct and uniform. 

A dictionary card catalog of books in the juvenile department 
is being made by the attendants in that room. 

The reference department continues the index to weekly 
periodicals and has added the usual number of bibliographies. 

The open shelf system has greatly increased the usefulness of 
the shelf lists which are the indexes to books as they stand on the 
shelves. Extra copies have been typewritten, divided to corres- 
pond with each stack and vicinity, and placed in racks on the 
ends of the stacks. 

The fiction list in the Rudolph indexers has been sub-divided 
and extended through the two indexers provided originally for 
history and literature. The four indexers owned by the library^ 
are now devoted to fiction, the author alphabet filling three and 
the subject index the fourth. 

On September i, the time of the cataloger was increased 
from half a day to a full day of service ; but on September 27 it 
was found necessary in order to comply with a contract for print- 
ing to use the full strength of the catalog department in the 
preparation of copy for a printed bulletin of history and literature^ 
The use of the linotype made it impossible to use the written 
cards for printers' copy. The material was therefore entirely 
rearranged and rewritten. This work was begun on September 
27 ; the first copy went to the printers on October 11, and the last 
pages were given November 24. The entire work will be ready 
for sale early in December. 

This bulletin will cover nearly ten thousand volumes and is. 
an author list, with a limited number of subject headings. 

WORK ROOM. 

The work room, which is a room 30 feet in length by 12 in. 
width, was somewhat relieved by the new distribution of work. 
A part of the accessioning was placed in the library room nearest 



REPORT OP UBRARIAN. I5 



th^ work room. Some watchfulness over the open shelves can in 
this way be combined with the clerical labor. The cataloging 
desk was placed in the large library, adding to the apparent sur- 
veillance of the shelves as well as taking one table from the over- 
crowded room. During the year, besides accessioning, cataloging 
and shelf-listing the 4952 books added, there have been 3966 books 
made ready for bindery and again, when bound, replated and 
labeled for circulation. In addition to this, 31,964 have been 
mended. This room is also the store room for supplies. 

READING ROOM. 

There were added during the year 24 di£ferent periodicals to 
the list 

There have been 197 different magazines and papers taken, 
many of these duplicated for circulation, making up a list of 456 
in all, 251 for use in the reading room, and 205 for circulation. 

ADfllNISTRATION. 

There hits been but one resignation during the past year and 
two attendants have been added. The library staff now ntmibers 
tweaty-five officers: a librarian, two assistant librarians, and 
twenty-two other assistants. 

Eight promotions have occurred since last December and aid 
in work has been given by members of three different training 
classes. 

TRAINING CLASS. 

Los Angeles does not offer to pupils a course as extensive as 
that of a library school, but conducts what the name signifies, a 
training class, aiming to give a thorough grounding in the prin- 
ciples of a library education. 

Young women not under seventeen years of age are eligible to 
membership upon passing an oral examination conducted by the 
committee on attendants of the board of directors of the library. 
This examination is designed to determine whether by previous 
education and natural adaptability the applicant is justified in 
undertaking library work. 

The following, selected from the questions prepared for the 
last examination, may fairly determine the character of these 
examinations : — 

1. What is a lyric ? Give an example. 
What is a pastoral ? Give an example. 
What is an epic ? Give an example. 

2. What did Emerson write ? Give some titles. 



1 6 i;OS ANGBI«BS PUBIflC LIBRARY. 

3. Who wrote ** Prue and I** ? 

4. Who wrote the ** Battle Hymn of the Republic '* ? 

5. In what poem does the character of " Pompilia " appear ? 

6. What was the Salem witchcraft ? The French and Indian 
war? 

7. Name officers comprising the cabinet of the United 
States. 

8. What form of government exists in Switzerland ? 

9. Name two of our greatest living sculptors. 

10. What do you know about social settlement work? 

A class is limited to six regular members, each of whom is 
required to spend in the library three hours daily for six months. 
Practical work is done in each department of the library with 
class discussions on comparative methods. No tuition is required, 
the assistance given by pupils and the advantage of having train- 
ing class graduates from whom to fill vacancies occurring in the 
regular force of employees, being sufficient compensation for the 
time and materials required for their instruction. 

At the expiration of the course, a written examination is given 
covering the technical work done ; a thesis on the subject of library 
economy and a bibliography on a practical topic are required. 

Of the class in progress at the time of the last report, three 
members were granted certificates, one receiving immediate em- 
ployment upon the night force. 

In June, twenty-five applicants were examined for admission 
to the ninth training class. Twelve were accepted. The first six 
were organized into the ninth class and being young women of 
experience and maturity of mind, it was thought possible for them 
to do the work in three months, serving six hours per day. This 
plan did not prove satisfactory either to pupils or library, aa 
eighteen hours a day for six months can be used to better advan- 
tage than thirty-six hours for three months. 

Though the conditions were unfavorable, the work done by 
this class was unusually scholarly. The class spent a day, late in 
their course, at Long Beach, classifying the public library of some 
four hundred volumes. 

The remaining six accepted candidates were organized into 
the tenth class, beginning work Sept. 27, and are taking the 
course in the usual time. 

RB-ORQANIZATION. 

The most important work of the year has been the re-organiz- 
ing, which gave to the public free access to the shelves in the 
greater part of the library. 



RBPORT OF UBRARIAN. l^ 



After the decision of your bi^rd to open the shelves, the chief 
struggle was with a set of rooms widely di£fering from accepted 
models. A careful study of the floor plan of the library led to 
the following changes : First, the former book room was made a 
general reading room, the large alcove at the south side being 
given to newspapers, the magazine desk being placed on the north 
side of the room, the intervening space filled with tables for 
readers. Second, the former reading rooms on the north side of 
the building were made to receive the stacks for all the classes. 
Shelf room was added by putting shelves on all available wall 
space in these two rooms. Third, the ladies* reading room, also on 
the north side, was given to the reference room. There was a 
loss of space in this last change which is more than made up by 
the proximity to the classes. The open shelf makes the whole 
library reference to those who desire it and the demand upon the 
reference room itself is thereby lessened. 

A department was made for fiction from the juvenile room 
which was outgrown almost as soon as made early in the year, 
combined with the adjoining room devoted to the school work. 
The removal of a partition gave a room about twenty feet square, 
sufficiently large to contain fiction and give some storage capacity 
for bound magazines. 

The school and juvenile department was given the former 
reference room and has been before mentioned. The corridors, 
hitherto useless, are now utilized on the south side near the fiction 
department for the Rudolph indexers and for tables devoted to 
lists. 

The opposite side of the stairway was partitioned with glass, 
and a small ladies* room was constructed. The daily papers are 
placed here, with a few periodicals devoted to the home. With a 
general reading room of so great size, and the library open to all 
for reading and reference, the large space before used as a ladies* 
reading room was no longer a necessity. Certain abuses of this 
room which had grown out of the former condition have been 
eradicated by the new arrangements. 

The library was closed for these changes and repairs August 
35 and reopened September 8. Upon August 23 and 24 the 
readers were allowed to draw two books on each card, in order to 
make up partially for the period of closed doors. 

It is not wise to draw any conclusions concerning this experi- 
I ment of free access in our library at the end of only three months. 

! We do however append to the tables of circulation a comparison 

between the use of the classes during September, October and 
November in each of the past three years. It is an indication, at 



l8 I«OS ANGSI«ES FX7BI,IC LIBRARY. 

least, that the open shelf influences to better reading than does 
the use of call numbers. The end of another year will furnish 
more accurate statistics for deductions. 

I should be denpng myself a pleasure as well as neglecting & 
duty did I not in this public way extend my thanks to the staff for 
their faithful and conscientious work during the past months. It 
would have been impossible to re-organize and renovate a library 
of this size in the short space of twelve days without the earnest 
co-operation of the entire force. This was cheerfully given, and 
has been unfailing. In this willing support of a corps of assist* 
ants loyal to every interest of the library, lies the greatest power 
to meet the ever growing demands upon this institution. It also 
renders one safe in prophesying that the l/os Angeles library will 
retain the high position gained in previous years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harriet Child Wadlbigh, 

Librarian. 



,* 



APPBNDIXBS. 19 



APPENDIXES. 



A, Historical Sketch of Los Angeles Public Library. 

B, List of Donors of Books and Pamphlets, 

C, Tabulated Report of Circulation, 



1 



20 l,OS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Los Angeles Public Library. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



Tuesday, December 7, is the twenty-iSfth anniversary of the 
organization of the I^os Angeles Public Library, and marks the 
beginning of the third and greatest period of its healthy and 
steady development. In the last quarter of a century it has grown 
from a small library and reading room, supported solely by sub- 
scriptions and donations, into a most important member of the 
body politic, kept up by regular appropriations from the funds of 
the city, for the education and pleasure of thousands of people. 

Prom the four dark little rooms in the old Downey block it has 
spread over the entire third floor of the city hall, aod it is now 
growing so rapidly, in order to keep pace with the public demand, 
that a new building devoted to the library alone is one of the 
urgent needs in the near future. 

Previous to 1872 a number of efforts had been made to start 
a library in Los Angeles. Several had actually struggled into 
brief life, but were soon snuffed out through sheer lack of 
interest. People had no time to read in those early days. 
When the need of books was really felt by the people who 
had no private libraries, the public library came into being 
and stayed. A mass meeting was called December 7, 1872, at 
which over two hundred prominent citizens were present. 
The meeting was held at the old Merced Theatre, comer of 
Arcadia and Spring streets. Gen. J. R. McConnell presided 
and W. J. Brodrick was made secretary. Upon the platform 
were sixty-six vice-presidents, all men whose names are well 
known in Southern California. Fully one-third of these names 
were Spanish, for the old regime had hardly faded out of the land 
in 1872, and with the others stand high as promoters of the 
growth of Los Angeles. 

Organization of the Los Angeles Library Association was 
promptly effected, and a committee was appointed to canvass the 
city for members, subscriptions, and donations of books. This 



I 

J 



AFP8NDIX A. 21 



committee included Gov. John G. Downey, H. K. W. Bent, Harris 
Newmark, W. J. Brodrick and S. B. Caswell. The first subscrip- 
tion papers read as follows : 

'*The undersigned, with the view of establishing a public 
library in the city of Los Angeles, do hereby become members 
of the Los Angeles Library Association and agree to pay the sums 
set opposite our names as donations, entrance fees, or for life 
membership as specified.*' A number of citizens became life 
members of the association at an entrance fee of I50, and others 
gave liberally both in money and books. 

Gov. Downey gave four rooms of the upper floor of the 
Downey block, rent free, for three months, and these rooms were 
at once fitted up with open shelves, newspaper racks and tables. 
The trustees appointed for the first three months were : Gov. J. 
G. Downey, S. B. Caswell, H. K. W. Bent, Col. G. H. Smith, 
Judge Sepulveda, W. H. Mace, A. W. Potts, T. W. Temple, R. H. 
Dalton, Gen. Stoneman, Col. B. M. Stanford, W. B. Lawler and 
Gen. McConnell. These men went actively to work to put the 
library on its feet and it grew apace. J. C. Littlefield was 
appointed librarian, and the city was thoroughly canvassed for 
money and books. The people responded liberally. Money was 
raised in response to every demand, and many volumes were 
given and loaned from private libraries of well selected books. 

The trustees received hearty co-operation and assistance from 
such men as J. R. Toberman, then mayor of the city, Engenio F. 
de Cells, Judge E. M. Ross, Stephen M. White, and many others. 
Through the political influence of these men work was immedi- 
ately begun in the legislature for the passage of an act enabling 
the dty to appropriate a portion of its public funds for the support 
of the library, so that as it grew it should not be entirely depend- 
ent on private subscriptions and donations. At the first meeting 
of the board of trustees. President Downey in the chair, a resolu- 
tion was adopted to memorialize the coming legislature for the 
passage of an enabling act, in order that a small tax be levied for 
one year on taxpayers of the city for library purposes, subject to 
the vote of the people. Prom this basis work went steadily on in 
Sacramento until, at the twentieth session of the legislature in 
1873 and 1874, the act was passed providing for the establishment 
of a public library in Los Angeles. This act went through various 
changes and amendments until May 20, 1878, when the first board 
of regents was appointed by the mayor. Afterwards, the mayor 
and the city council sat periodically as ex-officio board of regents 
until the change to the present system. 

In 1876 another subscription paper was put in circiilation for 



32 LOS ANGBLBS PUBIJC LIBRARY. 

the purpose of obtaining a better supply of magazines and peri- 
odicals. This, also, brought forth a generous response, as funds 
never failed for the support and extension of the library. Its 
constant growth and increasing demands finally suggested the 
idea of giving a ball for the benefit of the library fund. It took 
place in June, 1877, in the old Tumverein hall, that stood on the 
present site of Music hall, and proved a decided success, netting 
f 220 for the purchase of books. 

Other entertainments followed, and in February, 1880, the 
largest donation of books was made from the proceeds of the 
famous Dickens party, a social event that will be remembered for 
the lifetime of the elder generation. The idea was a hit, and the 
interest grew until not only all Los Angeles, but nearly all the 
surrounding country, was studying Dickens, dramatizing the 
striking scenes in the most famous of his novels, and selecting 
people to fit the characters. 

Everyone helped and the scheme grew from a quiet evening 
party to four entertainments in the Tumverein hall, given to 
packed houses. No good theatre properties were available, but 
but such was the enthusiasm that everything needful for the 
scenes was supplied from private houses, even to whole sets of 
furniture. Three public enterprises were benefited by the pro- 
ceeds, the share of the library being $250. The money was placed 
in the hands of a committee and applied to the purchase of 
a well selected collection of books, covering the best standard 
works in English literature. 

The period between 1880 and 1889 was not covered by so 
many donations, but occasional subscriptions kept the library 
going until the establishment of the present order of things. 
Patrick Connolly succeeded Mr. Littlefield as librarian in 1879 
and held the position until the appointment of Miss Mary E. Foy 
in 1880. Miss Foy was succeeded by Miss Jessie Gavitt, who acted 
as librarian until 1889. In that year the adoption of a new city 
charter changed the whole character of the library. The new 
charter dispensed with the board of regents and provided for a 
board of directors to be appointed by the mayor, this board to 
to have entire control of the library and its finances. In July, 
1889, the library was moved from the Downey block to the 
city hall and closed for the summer that the books might be 
classified. The Dewey system of classification was employed and 
is still in use. The records show that the library contained just 
6600 bookft when it was moved into the city hall. An extra large 
appropriation was made that year on condition that $10,000 be 



APPBNDIX A. 23 



applied to the purchase of books, and the library entered upon 
the second period of its development. 

The board of directors appointed by Mayor Hazard, March 25, 
1889, included : G. A.Dobinson, president, E. W. Jones, F. H. 
Howard, J. Mills Davies and H. Jay Hanchette. Miss Tessa L. Kelso 
was appointed librarian, and under this able management the lib- 
rary grew and flourished for six years. Under the provisions of the 
charter it was given much greater scope as to finances, and the ex- 
cellent administration of the funds provided insured a healthy 
growth. July i, 1891, the library was made entirely free, deriving its 
sole support from the annual appropriation of a portion of the city 
funds, and from gifts. In 1895, Miss Kelso was succeeded by Mrs. 
Clara B. Fowler, who held the position of librarian until the 
appointment this year of Mrs. Harriet C. Wadleigh. The library 
has been greatly changed and has entered on its third period of 
development, which means a new building and greatly increased 
facilities for suppl3dng the public demand for books. 



24 IX>S ANGKLBS PUBUC LIBRARY. 



OFFICERS 



or THC 



Los Angeles Public Library. 

Arranged chronologically. 



LIBRARIANS. 



Littlefield J. C Dec, 1872— Jan., 1879 

Connolly, P .Jan., 1879— June, 1880 

Foy, Mary B Jiine, 1880— Jan., 1884 

Gavitt, Jessie A .Jan., 1884— Jan., 1889 

Prescott, I^ydia A Jan., 1889— Apr., 1889 

Kelso, Tessa L Apr. i, 1889 — May i, 1895 

Fowler, Clara B May i, 1895— June 15, 1897 

Wadleigh, Harriet Child .June 15, 1897 



FIRST BOARD OP DIRECTORS. 

APPOINTKD DKCEMBCR, ISTt. 

J. G. Downey, lyesident, Harris Newmark. 

S. B. CaswelL Y. Sepulveda. 

H. K. W. Bent. W. H. Mace. 

Col. Geo. H. Smith. A. W. Potts. 

Gen. Geo. Stoneman. T. W. Temple. 

W. B. I/iwler. R. H. Dalton. 



APPENDIX A. 



25 



D1RBCT0R5— 1 889-1 897. 



l>obinson,G. A 1889-1895 

Howard, P. H 1889-1895 

Hanchette, H.Jay 1889-1891 

Jones, E. W 1889-1891 

Daviea, J. M 1889-1893 

Severance, Mr8.C.M. 1891-1893 

Smith, Col. Geo. H 1891-1893 

Borden, Sheldon 1893-1895 

Hamilton, W.J 1893-1895 

Spalding, W. A 1893-1895 



Bonebrake, Geo. H...1895-1897 

Flint, F. P 1895-1897 

O'Melveny, H. W 1895-1897 

Stewart, Geo. H...... .1895-1897 

Storrs, H. E 1895-1897 

Dockweiler, Isidore B 1897 

Burbank, W. P 1897 

Foster, Ernest K 1897 

Garland, W. M.... 1897 

Rogers, Earl 1897 



ATTENDANTS. 

Gavitt, Jessie A ..April i, 1889 — Feb. i, 1890. 

Marquis, Barton, Apr. i, 1889 — Sept. i, 1889. 

Haines, Estelle Sept. i, 1889— May i, 1895. 

Hasse, Adelaide R Sept. i, 1889— May i, 1895. 

Wellman, Mrs. Eva A Sept. i, 1889— June 5, 1891. 

Fenner, Lena B Sept. 9, 1889— June 1, 1893. 

Gleason, Celia Dec. i, 1889. 

I/ongstreet, Mame P Dec. i, 1889 — Apr. i, 1890. 

Bumiller, Emma Jan. 7, 1890— Mar. 1,1890. 

Russ, Nellie M Feb. 3, 1890. 

Beville, Blanche Aug. 3, 1890— Oct. i, 1893. 

Clarke, M. E Aug. 3, 1890— Nov. 9, 1890. 

Avery, Zora Nov. 17, i890^Dec. 31, 1890. 

Fargo, Elizabeth Nov. 19, 1890. 

Kimball, Helen L Nov. 20, 1890 — Sept. i, 1893. 

Logan, Margaret ...Apr. 27, 1891 — Oct. i, 1893. 

Walker, Stella May 14, 1891— Nov. 20, 1894. 

Hendricks, Ida May 25, 1891 — Sept. 25, 1891. 

Wise, Corinne .June 29, 1891. 

Tedford, Martha S Sept. 14, 1891— July i, 1896. 

Xingsley, Cordelia May 23, 1892 — Aug. i, 1896. 

Mercer, Harriet May 23, 1892 — Apr. i, 1897. 

Pierce, Bertha E May 23, 1892— July i, 1896. 

Miller, Nora A Aug. 8, 1892. 

Thomburg, Florence Aug. 8, 1892. 

Austin, Anna D Aug. 9, 1892. 

Darlow. Gertrude July 10, 1893. 



26 LOS ANGELAS FUBUC UBRARY. 

•Nevin, Helen A July lo, 1893. 

Putnam, Blanche A July 10, 1893. 

Beckley, Anna Aug. i, 1893. 

Johnson, Mary Nov. i, 1893. 

Dunn, Mabel Mar. 8, 1894. 

Gleason, Pearl Sept i, 1894. 

Moore, Edith Sept. i, 1894. 

Horgan, Georgia Oct. i, 1894. 

Barl, Anna Dec. i, 1894— Jan. i, 1896. 

Hand, Mabelle .June i, 1895. 

Prentiss, Mabel Oct. i, 1895. 

Bennett, Mamie May i, 1896. 

Blanchard, Mae D July i, 1896. 

Clarke, Christine July 3i> 1896. 

Young, Jessie M Sept 18, 1896. 

Bberhart, Rose May 27, 1897. 

Keach, May Mar. 26, 1897. 

• Resigned Feb. 6, 1894, to act as I^ibrsrian at Redlands. Retomed to X«os 
Angeles Ubrary Sept. 18, 1806. 



APPENDIX B. 27 



Donors of Books and Pamphlets. 



During the past year donations of books and pamphlets have 
been received from the following : 

Aberdeen Public Library ; Aguilar Free Library ; Amherst Col- 
lege ; American-Jewess ; American Sentinel ; Andrews, W. L ; 
Anaheim Gazette; Apprentices Library, Philadelphia; Arizona 
Citizen ; Armour Institute, Chicago ; Baillie's Institution ; Balch, 
Edwin S. ; Bangor Public Library ; Barlow, C. A. ; Barrows, H. D. ; 
Bath, England ; Battersea Public Library ; Bimetallic League,Lon- 
don ; Birney , Wm. ; Blanchard, Geo. ; Bootle Free Library ; Bron- 
son Library, Brunswick, Me ; Brookline Free Library ; Brooklyn 
Library ; Boston Public Library ; Bowdoin College ; Brown, Clara 
Spalding ; Brown, James S. ; Brown University ; Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege; Bufialo Library ; Bureau of American Republics ; Butte Free 
Public Library ; California Academy of Science ; California Board 
of Horticulture ; California Bureau of Highways ; California Cul- 
tivator and Poultry Keeper ; California Independent ; California 
Mining Bureau ; California Surveyor General ; California, Univers- 
ity of; California Volks Freund; Cambridge Public Library; 
Capital ; Cardiff Free Libraries ; Carnegie Free Library ; Case 
Library; Catholic Tidings; Chicago, University of; Chilcote, 
Gaylord H. ; Citrograph ; Cincinnati Public Library ; Cincinnati 
Museum Association ; Civil Service Reform Association ; Clerken- 
well Public Library ; Colorado, University of ; Colton Chronicle ; 
Colton News ; Coltmibia University ; Columbus Public Library ; 
Commercial Bulletin ; Concord Free Public Library ; Congression- 
al Record ; Connecticut Bureau of Labor ; Considar Report ; Croy- 
don Library ; Denver City Library ; Detroit Public Library ; East 
Side News ; Eau Claire Public Library ; El Barbareno ; Elsinore 
Press ; Enoch Pratt Free Library ; Engineers* Review ; Escondido 
Times ; Evanston Free Public Library ; Field Columbian Museum ; 
Forbes Library ; Friends* Society, Philadelphia ; Gassagne, Mrs. 
Julia ; Germania ; Germantown Free Library ; Gilroy Gazette ; 
Grant, John ; Hammersmith Public Library ; Hartford, Conn. ; 
Hartford Public Library ; Harvard University ; Heintz, C. M. ; 
Hemiup, Maria Remington ; Hill, J. S. ; Honolulu, Dept of For- 
eign Affairs ; Illinois Historical Libiary ; Illinois Bureau of Labor 
Statistics ; Illustrated Africa ; Indian Rights Association ; Interstate 
Coounerce Commission ; Irish National Federation of America ; 



28 IfOS ANGBI^BS PUBUC LIBRARY. 

James, G. Wharton ; Jersey City Free Public Library ; John's Hop- 
kins University ; Jones, John P. ; Kentucky Polytechnic Society ; 
Labor World ; Land of Sunshine ; L. A. W. Bulletin and Good 
Roads ; La Union ; Las Dos Republicas ; Leeds Free Public Lib- 
rary ; Le Francais ; Le Progres ; Leland Stanford, Jr., University ; 
Literary News ; Livermore, Chas. W. ; Liverpool Public Library ; 
Livingston, C. P. ; Los Angeles Board of Trade ; Los Angeles Ex- 
press ; Los Angeles Herald ; Los Angeles Times ; Los Angeles 
Journal ; Los Angeles Record ; Los Angeles Sunday World ; Lynn 
Public Library ; Lower Califomian ; L'Union Nouvelle ; LytleJ. J. ; 
McClatchie, A. J. ; McCormick Harvesting Machine Co. ; Man- 
chester City Library ; Manhattan Bast Side Mission Free Circulat- 
ing Library ; Manufiacturer ; Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy ; Merced Star ; Michigan, University of; Milwaukee Public 
Library ; Mining and Metallurgical ; Minneapolis Public Library ; 
Minnesota Historical Society ; Missouri Botanical Garden ; Mon- 
roe, Mrs. Lewis B. ; Mortimer, C. White ; Mt. Holyoke College ; 
Munson, Myron A. ; National Civil Service Reform League ; 
Newark Free Public Library ; New Bedford Free Public Library ; 
New Britain Institute ; Newcastle-upon-Tyne Public Library ; New 
Hampshire Historical Society ; New Haven Free Public Library ; 
Newton Free Library ; New York Farmers ; New York Free Lib- 
rary ; New York Public Library ; New York Mechanics' Institute ; 
New York Mercantile Library ; New York State Charities Associa- 
tion; New York, University of ; Oakland Free Library; Oakland 
Mechanics' Institute; Oakland Tribune; Ohio State Library; 
Omaha Public Library ; Ontario Record ; Osterhout Free Library ; 
Pasadena and Pacific Railway Co. ; Pasadena News ; Patent Office 
Gazette ; Paterson Free Public Library ; Pennsylvania College of 
Dental Surgery; Pennsylvania, University of; Peterborough Pub- 
lic Library ; Petsch, Adolph ; Philadelphia Free Public Library ; 
Philadelphia Library Company ; Philadelphia Mercantile Library ; 
Philadelphia St. James Guild ; Philadelphia National Municipal 
League ; Pittsburg Carnegie Library ; Pomona Beacon ; Pomona 
Progress ; Portland Public Library ; Pratt Institute ; Press and 
Horticulturist ; Providence Athenaeum ; Providence Public Lib- 
rary ; Railroad Record ; Redondo Breeze ; Riverside Enterprise ; 
Rochdale, England ; Rural Califomian ; Rusherwein, Wm. ; Sac- 
ramento Bee ; Sacramento Record Union ; Salem Public Library ; 
San Bernardino Times-Index ; San Francisco Board of Supervis- 
ors ; San Francisco Call ; San Francisco Mechanics' Institute ; 
San Francisco Public Library ; Santa Monica Outlook ; Schenect- 
ady Free Public Library ; Scranton Public Library ; Seattle Public 
Library ; Sheffield Free Public Library ; Smith, Geo. H. ; Smith- 



APPENDIX B. 29 



sonian Institute; Somerville Public Library; Sound Currency; 
So. Cal. Academy of Science ; So. Cal. Practitioner ; Springfield 
City Library ; St. George Public Library ; St Giles Public Library ; 
St. Joseph Free Public Library; St. Louis Mercantile Library; 
St. Louis Free Public Library ; St. Louis, Mo. ; St Louis Merch- 
ants' Exchange ; St Paul Public Library ; Steward, J. P ; Sud 
California Post ; Swift, Morrison ; Sydney Public Library ; Syrap 
cuse Central Library ; Tennessee University Magazine ; Thick- 
strum, J. C. ; Thurston, Lorrin A. ; Tombstone Prospector ; Toronto 
Public Library ; Trenton, N. J., Bureau Statistics ; Tufts Library ; 
Tulare Register ; Union Signal ; Unitarian Society of San Fran- 
cisco ; U. S. Bureau of Information ; U. S. Civil Service Com- 
mission ; U. S. Dept of Agriculture ; U. S. Dept of Interior ; U. S. 
Dept. of Labor ; U. S. Dept. of State ; U. S. Dept. of Treasury ; 
U. S. Dept of War ; U. S. Dept. of Documents ; Ventura Weekly ; 
Vermont, University of ; Visalia Delta ; Warren County Library ; 
Webb, Louis K. ; Wellesley Club ; Wellesley Magazine ; Wesleyan 
University ; Whittier ; Wicks, M. L ; Wigan Free Public Library ; 
Wilmington Institute ; Wilshire, H. G. ; Wisconsin Historical So- 
ciety; Wolverhampton Free Library; Worcester Free Public 
Library ; Yale University. 



30 



I,OS ANGBLSS PUBIJC UBRARY. 



CLASSIFIED CIRCULATION, 1896-<^. 



Philosophy 

Theology 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science.... 

Useful Arts 

Pine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels , 

Biography 

French 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

Music 

Fiction 

Juvenile 

Bound Magazines. 

Magazines 

Plates «. 



Pint 6 months. 



Second 6 months 



Home 


I^lbrary 


Home 


1372 


385 


1508 


2013 


625 


1803 


3970 


438 


3167 


889 


68 


491 


4426 


394 


3185 


1711 


431 


1735 


1694 


327 


1669 


6974 


1652 


6752 


4674 


1834 


3953 


5663 


1798 


4662 


2914 


1232 


2847 


1654 


143 


1546 


1092 


276 


738 


142 


23 


88 


1080 


44 


719 


2252 


107 


2029 


108825 


2898 


120945 


31812 


6656 


27653 


8770 


2495 


7853 


15611 


31041 


1 1940 


259 


I 


109 



l4hrBr7 
877 

mo 

727 
211 

1068 

997 

797 

3307 

1734 
1679 

1210 

332 

246 

16 

80 

217 

2366 

8382 

2379 
31041 



Reference Room readers. 



Total for 
the Year. 



4142 

5551 
8302 

1659 

9273 

4874 

4487 
18885 

I2195 

13802 

8203 

3693 
2352 
269 
1923 
4605 
235034 

74503 
21497 

84950 

369 

520568 
50579 



Total. 



571147 



APPBNDIX C. 



3t 



SCHOOL CIRCULATION. 



Philosophy.... 

Theology 

Sociology 

Philology 

Nat'rl Science 
Useful Arts.... 
Pine Arts ..... 
Literature..... 

History , 

Travels 

Biography.... 

French 

Music 

Fiction 

Juvenile , 

Bo'nd M'g'zns 
Magazines... 
Plates 

Total 



1806 
Dec. 

8 

34 
144 

46 
231 

19 

9 
268 

264 

275 

83 

I 

2 

183 
962 

70 

143 
53 



1897 
Jan. 

15 

79 
142 

53 
320 

22 

16 

330 
291 

356 

"5 

3 
I 

217 

tio9 

103 

194 

47 



15 

65 
140 

82 

323 

13 
16 

281 

302 

343 
129 

3 
I 

192 

1054 
loi 

211 
64 



Mar. 

9 
80 

183 

147 
461 

30 
26 

317 
362 

359 
128 

3 

I 

186 

1352 

151 

297 
8 



Apr. 

I 

43 
92 

74 
260 

18 

IS 
258 
249 

194 
no 

7 

I 

141 
606 

39 
164 

47 



May 

4 
62 

136 
122 

381 

30 

19 

247 
302 

318 

134 

3 
I 

162 

918 

93 

17 
27 



Oct 

5 

32 

no 

86 

313 

41 

14 
188 

231 

200 

57 

3 

I 

46 
556 
49 
24 
71 



Nov. 



31 

60 

315 
19 
14 
163 
132 
213 

156 

3 

28 
611 

65 
18 



Total 

57 
420 

1041 
670 

2604 
192 
129 

2052 

2133 
2258 

912 

26 

8 

1155 
7168 

671 

1208 

317 

..^^— •.« 

23027 



32 



I.OS ANGBLES PUBUC LIBRARY. 



JUVENILE CIRCULATION. 



CLASS. 


Jan. 


Feb. 

■■••• 


Mar. 
6 


Apr. 


May 
8 


June 

1 


July 

1 


Aug. 

1 


Sep. 
8 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Totl 


PhikMopliy 


8 


4 


6 


1 


28 


Theology 



218 


16 

244 

15 


28 

288 

18 


18 

248 

5 


12 

270 

14 


14 

842 

12 


7 
820 

7 


10 

288 

8 


17 
280 

4 


17 
270 

7 


20 

214 

1 


leo* 


SocioloffT. .. ...... 


2968 


PhiloloffT....^ 


81 


Natnr'l Science 


12S 


112 


104 


118 


146 


154 


111 


U6 


128 


154 


117 


1874 


Useful Arta 


10 


18 


18 


8 


11 


17 


18 


10 


18 


18 


15 


154 


Pine Arts 


81 
42 


68 
88 


62 
68 


44 

52 


48 
68 


47 
67 


88 
57 


28 
84 


26 
44 


41 
81 


48 
66 


509 


Literature 


662 


History 


117 
262 
188 


144 
206 
188 


128 
262 
160 


186 

188 

88 


147 

168 

88 


166 

186 

88 


168 
187 
110 


185 

188 

88 


122 
204 
101 


164 

222 

88 


185 
188 
124 


1547 


Travels 


2251 


Biography.. 


1204 


Fiction 


4278 
460 


4268 

608 


4888 

681 


4268 
008 


4407 
666 


4866 
788 


6888 

766 


4116 
548 


4006 

461 


4080 

457 


816B 
868 


47788* 


Bound M'g'sns 


6018> 


Magasines. 


88 


86 


84 


84 


57 


82 


60 


86 


28 


46 


86 


427 


Plates.. 


••••• 


••■M 


■ •■•« 


• •••• 


••••• 


«««4* 


■«••• 


M... 


••••■ 


8 


4 


7 




B60ir 







APPENDIX C. 



33 



DAILY CIRCULATION. 



December, 1896. 
January, 1897.... 

Pebmaiy 

March 

April 

May -... 

June 

Joly 

Angrnst 

September M 

October 

November 



Smallest 
Day 



1241 
1 105 
IOI9 

1332 
563 
1315 
1343 
1478 

I318 
1407 

1 174 
1484 



I<argest 
Day 



2400 

2451 
2704 
2701 

2739 
2154 
2276 

2208 

3306 

3891 

2431 
2661 



Dally 



1559 

1643 
1671 

1713 

x6io 
1566 

1569 
1569 
1912 
1961 
1631 

1763 






COnPARATIVB TABLE OP CIRCULATION. 



ci^Asa 



Philoaophy 

Theology 

Sociology , 

Philology 

Natural Science ... 

Useful Arts 

Pine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Biography 

Poreign 

Music 

Bound Magaiines.. 



Total 



18B5. 

Sep. Oct. 

Nov. 



952 
X161 

I519 

449 

1726 

750 
1087 
2962 

1957 

2447 

1471 
2222 

992 

4272 



23967 



1806. 

Sep. Oct. 

Nov. 



799 

941 
1792 

434 
2029 

953 

923 

2631 

1910 
2320 

1323 
1815 

IIOI 

5025 



23996 



1807. 

Sep. Oct. 

Nov. 



1623 

I931 
2103 

503 
2847 
1805 

1554 
6724 

3583 
3900 
2456 

1874 
1 187 

5183 



37273 



Per cent, of increase 1895-1896 : .001 

1896-1897: .13-I- 



<i 



It 



I 






Los Angeles PubMc Library 



Hi 



Annual Report 



of the 



Board of Director 



and 



Librarian 



For the Year 
1898 




rz: 



•■^ 









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'5 S? 







LOS ANGELES 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Annual Report 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



AND 



Report 



OF THE 



LIBRARIAN 



FROM DECEMBER I, 1897, TO NOVEMBER 30» 1898. 



Los Angeles Public Library 



IsiDO&B B. DocKwan^SR, IVesidetU, 
W. M. GAUjkND, Vice-PresidenL 
B&NKST K. PosTBR, Secretary. 
Wm. p. Burbank. 
Bari. Rogbrs. 



COMMITTEES. 



Aiiendants: Eari, Rogbrs, Hrnbst K. Postbr. 
Auditing and Accounts : W. M. Gari«and, Wbc P. Burbakk. 
Books and Donations : Brnbst K. Postbr, Bari, Rogbrs. 
IVinting and Sullies : Wm. P. Burbank, Bari, Rogbrs. 
Rules and Administration : Wm. P. Burbank, W. M. Gariulnd. 

The President Is a member of all committees. 



Harribt Canj} Wadlbigh, Librarian and Clerk o/tke Board. 
Cbi«ia GIiBason, Assistant Librarian. 



HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS. 



Buzabrth Pargo, School. 
Nora A. Mh^i^br, Registration. 
Plorbncb Thornburg, Mail. 
Hbi«Bn a. Nbvin, Cataloging. 
Gbrtrudb Darlow, Classification 
BukNCHB Putnam, tuTenile. 
Anna Bbcki,by, Reference. 
Mary Johnson, Accession. 
Mabbixb Hand, Piction. 



ATTENDANTS IN GENERAL. 




CI,A88 "A." 






(No ■wrigament.) 






CI,A8S"B." 




GnnxTDB Daklow 
B.KLMxt A. NBvnr 

AlfHA BECKLMY 


Nora a. Millbb 
Flo&bncb Thornburo 
Mart Johnson 

CLASS " C." 


Blanchb Putnam 

BUZABBTB PAROO 


Mabbixb Haud 

Mabri, Dunn 
Bdith Mookx 


Mabsl Prbntiss 

MAB D. BI.ANCBARD 

CLASSED." 


CBRomNB Clark 

CORINNB WISB 


RosbBbbrhabt 
Pbarx. B. Glbason 

Gboboxa HoaoAN 


Tbssib Young 
Bbmib Bbnz 
Gbrtrudb Saxton 

MiRA JACOBX78 


Dora Mason 
Francbs NBSBIT 
Anna I«ono 
Bbrtha Kanb 



Mart C. Harrauoh, temporary sasistsiit in catalogliic depttrtmeat. 



i 






I ^ 




Oldest 



REPORT 



OFTHI 



Board of Directors 



OP THE 



Los Angeles Public Library 



DBCBMBER, 1898. 



ABenefidal 
Chance. 



)^ WhatiBMost 



Cataloging. 



To the Honorable the City Council of Los Angeles: 

GSNTLHHBN : The Board of Directors of the Lo6 Angeles 
Public Library has the honor to submit to yonr Honorable Body 
its annual report. 

The important change instituted by this board of giving 
personal access to books on the shelves has been greatly appreci- 
ated by readers. It has resulted in much advantage to investigators 
and students ; it has made readers more familiar with books as 
they relate to topics and classes ; it has given opportunity to the 
public to become readers ef the better sort of books. 

We desire especially to call your attention to the need of more 
room and larger resources. The library ought to have what is 
commensurate with its work ; it should have an income equal to 
that of similar institutions elsewhere, judged by their work. 
There are libraries in the United States circulating fewer books 
but having double the income. 

In the cataloging department considerable progress has been 
made, but there still remains a great deal to be done. Among 
nearly fifty thousand entries, the re-writing of soiled and torn 



4 



hOS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Sdiool and 
JnTenile. 



Bindinf. 



Spedml 
Demands. 



Reference 
Department. 



Change in 
System. 



Classification 
of Attendants 



catalog cards is in itself quite an item of work. Added to this is 
the cataloging of some thousands of new books every year. 

Under the open-shelf system^ boys and girls are becoming 
much more familiar with the use of books. More books relating 
to science and fewer novels have been used. The school reference 
department is much appreciated. Of the four hundred and eighty 
teachers in the city schools, four hundred and forty-four are draw- 
ing books. 

Lack of funds compelled us to retain unused a large number 
of books which should have gone without delay to the bookbinder. 
Some fifteen hundred volumes are now withheld from circulation 
on this account. Re-binding of our books has never been done so 
well nor so cheaply as in the x>ast year. Nevertheless, we think 
the library should have a bindery of its own, believing it would be 
a convenience and a saving, besides keeping out possible political 
intrigue with reference to patronage. 

There is a special demand for books on electricity, natural 
history, mining and the fine arts. The demand has increased for 
works on philosophy and other solid reading. All good books on 
Cuba and the Phillipines have been purchased as soon as issued, 
and they have gone into immediate circulation. A few years ago 
the library was very deficient in books which aid in the study of 
languages. This defect has in a measure been overcome. 

About eleven hundred carefully selected pictures have been 
secured and classified. This represents chiefly Italian paintings 
and famous edifices. The documents and books in the attic need 
protection against the constantly sifting dust from the roof— a 
matter which lends emphasis to the need of properly housing the 
city library. 

The board has divided the library into departments, placing 
an attendant in charge of each and giving to each head her proper 
share of responsibility. All supplies are now obtained after requi- 
sitions signed by the head of the department, submitted to the 
librarian and passed by the board. Individual responsibility, 
system and yearly examinations are the best of the recent innova- 
tions introduced into the library. 

In addition to dividing the library into departments, the 
attendants have also been classified, after an examination held for 
that purpose. 

The classes established are known by the designation of "A," 
"B," ''C" and "D," and a minimum and maximum salary 
assigned to each class. Any graduate of the training class when 
receiving a regular appointment as an attendant is at once assigned 
to class ** D " without further examination, and mtist serve in such 



RBPORT OF BOARD OF DniBCTO&S. 



Cfril Scrrloe. 



The Rules 
Upheld. 



Onr Prerkma 
Report. 



class at least one year before she can be advanced to a higher 
class. Any transfer from one class to another mnst be after a snc- 
cessfnl examination. 

The adoption of civil service mles for the library force 
(excepting the librarian and two assistants) has brought abont a 
more jnst and desirable status. It has stimulated the attendants 
to become more efficient, and made prominent the idea that pro- 
motion will depend mainly on their own efforts. 

A few months ago this board was the object of a pemidous and 
presumably willful attack on the assumption that it was endeavoring 
to violate these civil service rules in connection with filling the 
vacancy in the position of first assistant, when in fact, nothing was 
farther from its intention. No political considerations have influ- 
enced the board to give that place to any one. The board was 
farther attacked for withholding a report from the librarian, which 
report it had never received. This, too, was utterly tmfounded. 
These impleasant matters are referred to because the board feels 
that it is entitled to justice. 

We close by asking the new council to give the library the 
consideration demanded by its extensive work and influence. We 
ask you to read in connection with this report that for the year 
1897, which is perhaps the most suggestive and complete ever 
issued by any board of directors of the institution; a report 
which, we are proud to say, has been used as a model in an 
eastern library-training class. It partakes largely of the nature of 
a handbook and description of the library in its several depart- 
ments, and should engage the attention of those who esteem an 
institution which is the cap-stone of our local educational system. 
Respectfully submitted, 

IsiDORB B. DocKWBH^QR, President 
Wm. M. Garulnd. 
B. K. FosT^, 

W. F. BURBANK. 



hOS ANGBLBS PUBUC LIBRARY. 



Report of Librarian^ 

1897-98. 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Lidruty: 

OSNTi,BMBN— I have the honor to submit the tenth annual 
report of the work and condition of the Los Angeles Public 
Library, covering the year ending November 30, 1898. 

The city council apportioned to the library fund for the 
current fiscal year ending June 30, 1899, the sum of (26,373, being 
a levy of three and seventy-nine hundredths cents on each one 
hundred dolllirs of the assessed value of all taxable property. The 
maximum limit fixed by the city charter allows a levy which 
would have given us more than $30,000 this year. 

The receipts and expenditures of the library fond for the 
past year have been as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand from i896-'97 $ 5,146 04 

Balance of apportionment i897-'98 8,371 20 

Received on apportionment i898-'99 ii»673 20 

Fifty-eight books lost and paid for 61 24 

Duplicate books sold 36 92 

Supplies, etc., sold 7 20 

Finding lists sold 35 00 

Damaged books paid for 90 

Money refunded for subscriptions canceled. 2 38 

Fines 1,157 69 

Dues 6 00 

Borrowed fund. 4>5oo oa 

too,997 77 



RBPO&T OP LIBRARIAN. 



EXPENDITURBS. 

Books. $ 4,155 42 

Periodicals 1,325 58 

Binding.. 1,128 35 



$ 6.609 35 
13 lost books returned and money refunded.. 15 60 

Sundries expense $ 341 75 

Postage 169 47 



Printing — 

Annual report f 161 15 

Stationery and supplies 594 58 



Furniture and fixtures — 

Catalog case $ 

Shelving and carpenter work.. 

Photographs 

Pictures and framing 

Typewriter (Hammond) 

Photograph cases 

2 Blount door checks 

Card cutter , 

Cash drawer 



Salaries, regular 413,341 80 

Stmday and holiday service 294 40 

Janitor 595 00 

Cleaner. 180 00 



I 40 


00 


92 30 


16 


00 


44 


00 


60 


00 


9 


96 


6 


50 


6 


00 


2 


25 



511 22 



755 73 

Insurance 364 00 

Finding list.. 268 17 

Reorganizing and renovating — 

Electrical work... '„..$ 330 85 

Blectrical hardware 15 70 

Electrical fixtures.. 141 67 



488 23 



277 01 



13,411 to 

Carii tMklanoe 8,297 27 

too 997 77 



8 J,OS ANGELBS PUBLIC UBRAKY. 



DEPOSIT ACCOUNT. 



November 30, 1897 To balance I130 25 

November 30, 1898 To deposits received 431 30 

I561 55 



Szpenditnres— 

November 30, 1898 By deposits returned I415 30 

November 30, 1898 By balance 146 25 

fc6x 55 



REGISTRATION. 

The registers have been given a special revision during the 
past few weeks. The total registration has been decided by a 
careful count of the signatures. 

New members for the year (men) 19836 

" " '* (women) 2,675 

Total membership added for the year 4»5ix 

'< *' since September, 1889 39»i58 

Live membership November 30, 1898 33,173 

Notices sent out 18,309 

Changes of address 4ii75 

REFERENCE. 

The growth of club worJc in the city has shown itself in the 
reference room this year. Clubs and classes have been at work on 
a variety of subjects, such as art, architecture, painting, history, 
current events, literature and missions. 

The additions in this department have been particularly rich, 
and cover a wide range, as the following list will show : 

Copinger Transmission of the Bible. 

Expositors' Greek Testament. 

Polychrome edition of the Bible. 

Ancient laws and institutions of England. 

Hough American woods. 

Lawrence Marine algae of Los Angeles county. 

Thorpe Dictionary of applied chemistry. 

Ongania L'Art de Timprimerie a Venise. 

Colling.. English mediseval foliage. 



RBPORT OF UB&A&IiLN. 



Goodyear .Grammar of the lotus. 

Neafield.. Specimens of mediseval architecture. 

Pugin Specimens of Gothic architecture. 

PuUan Studies in architectural styles. 

Shaw Architectural sketches from the Continent. 

Sharpe Churches of the Nene Valley. 

Woolnoth... Canterbury cathedral. 

Palliser History of lace. 

Cyclopedia of sport. 

Burke Peerage and baronetage. ( 1898 edition. ) 

Yriarte Florence. 

Brinkley, ed..... Japan. 

Torquemada Monarquia Indians. (3 vols., 1723 edition.) 

Hakluyt Voyages, navigations, traffiques and discoveries of 

the English nation. -(3 vols, in 3. 1598 and 

1600.) 
A valuable Spanish library purchased from Mr. Prank de Thoma. 

Nearly thirteen hundred photographs have been purchased, 
•covering chiefly Italian paintings of the Renaissance, and famous 
buildings of Italy, although ancient sculpture is well represented. 
These photographs have been arranged by "schools," and a 
catalog is in preparation. The members of the art clubs and the 
teachers have already begim to appreciate their value. 

During the past year a large number of documents; hitherto 
missing, have been added, and a brief subject list prepsred of all 
unbound government pamphlets. 

Bibliographies and reading lists : 

Cuba; Immigration; Strikes; Future of the Slav ; Supremacy 
of the Anglo-Saxon ; Duelling ; Municipal reform ; Industrial 
•education ; Library law ; Folk-lore of the American continent ; 
Mexican archaeology ; Catacombs ; St. Petersburg ; Waldenses ; 
l/cssing ; Daudet ; Lummis ; Architecture ; Idealism in art ; Illus- 
tration of magazines ; London galleries ; Impressionism ; Scandi- 
navian literature ; C3rrano de Bergerac ; How to conduct literary 
K^lubs. 

Bibliographies prepared by pupils : 

American women poets; Browning; Constitutional conven- 
tions; English cathedrals; Hawaii;'. Manuscripts; Music; 
Painters of Italy ; Queen Elizabeth ; Tennyson ; Graded reading 
lists for children. 

TRAINING CLAS5BS. 

There have been graduated during the year six pupils, the 
entire tmmber forming the tenth training class. Diplomas were 



10 LOS ANGBLBS FUBUC UBRABY. 

giyen in March, and these graduates have supplied the sahstitates 
constantly needed daring the vacation period. An examination 
was held for the eleventh training class on July 7th last, which 
resulted in forming a class of six on July 14. To this class were 
added during the summer four special students. 

CATALOQINQ DBPARTMBNT. 

Books cataloged since Dec i, 1897, new, including duplicates 2628 
Books cataloged since Dec. x, 1897, old, (sociology) includ- 
ing duplicates aaoo 

Total 4828 



We have had in this department the entire time of the cata- 
loger, the assistance given by two pupils during the past six 
months, with an all-day assistant for one month. 

At the writing of the last annual report, the strength of this 
department was being given to the bulletin of history and literature 
which was finished in January. Besides cataloging the new books 
which had accumulated while printing the bulletin, the card 
catalog was fully revised when filing the cards of those classes 
finished last year—400 to 700 inclusive. This meant the editing of 
between fifty and sixty thousand cards. On filing the cards now 
now ready for the class 300— Sociology— patrons of the library will 
be given the detailed knowledge of our resources in law and 
politics, education and teaching, with many other related subjects^ 
This most important class is constantly in demand. 

With no diminution of the force, a few months will give an 
entire catalog to the public, as only the small classes remain, ooo 
— General, 100— Philosophy, and 200 — Religion. In this group 
are 3061 books, and it will be noticed that while comparatively 
few in number, the largest gains in circulation during the past 
year have been from these shelves. 

SCHOOL AND JUVENILE. 

The school reference library begun last year has increased to 
about two hundred and fifty volumes, and has been of great use to 
teachers and pupils throughout the year. That the teachers 
appreciate the department is shown by the increase in number of 
teachers making use of the department In 1897, out of four 
hundred and fifty teachers, there were three hundred and forty- 
six using ** school'' cards. In 1898, of the four hundred and 



RBFORT OF UBItA&IAN. XI 

eighty teachers in the city, four hundred and thirty-fonr drew 
books for school use. 

Besides the most familiar reference books, there has been 
placed at the disposal of the pupils an entire set of books neces- 
sary in the ninth year in English, and a nearly complete set of 
history for the same year. 

Since the uniting of school and juvenile departments, many 
teachers have very wisely preferred to send the pupils for their 
own books. The opening of the whole library also gives the older 
pupils greater opportunity to choose their own supplementary 
reading. This shows the loss in the juvenile circulation to be due 
probably to a broader use of the library as a whole. 

The Board of Education has added to this department all the 
leading educational and literary periodicals. The magazines so 
furnished are for the sole use of the teachers, and promise as much 
usefulness as the reference books. 

The addition of pictures has been a new feature of the juven- 
ile department The very broad tables are utilized by placing 
racks down the center which hold two lines of pictures, one 
facing each side of the table. Among the groups of pictures 
shown since the plan was adopted, are those illustrating the 
American revolution, the Alhambra, Shakespeare and his home, 
American warships, April anniversaries, besides reproductions 
of fiimous pictures. There is a collection of pictures cut from 
magazines, etc., mounted on cards and classified by country ; of 
statesmen, authors, painters, buildings, and the like. 

The case of valuable minerals loaned by a friend of the 
library has attracted great interest and study from the young folks, 
and frequently is scrutinized by older patrons. 

There have been several lists made during the past year; 
Summer Sports and Stories, Winter Sports and Stories, Vacation 
Recreations, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas, and American Indians, 
being among the number. There was also made a very full list of 
the books on the shelves belonging to series and sets. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

The past 3rear has brought several important changes to the 
staff. In January, Miss Nellie M. Russ, who had be a valued 
worker for several years, resigned to accept the position of librarian 
of the Pasadena Public Library. Miss Mabel Prentiss left in 
March to become an assistant to Miss Russ in the same institution. 

For the first time since the founding of the library in 1872, 
the staff has been lessened by the death of one of its members. 



IS LOS ANGBI#BS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Miss Corinne Wise, who was one of the force from 1891 until the 
time of her death last June, left a large number of friends. Miss 
Wise gave faithful service to the library through all these years. 
Her ever-ready aid to all who sought her assistance, combined 
with her kindly nature, endeared her alike to the patrons of the 
library and to her comrades. 

In September, Miss Austin, the first assistant for several 
years past, severed Tier connection with the library, and she was 
followed in November by Miss Mabel Hand of the fiction depart- 
ment. They carried with them into their new lives the most cordial 
good wishes of all their associates. 

The examination in January resulted in the appointment of 
nine heads of departments, and in two other promotions. 

There have been added during the year six attendants, all 
graduates from the training class. The staff now numbers 
twenty-six members. 

OBNERAL. 

It is a noticeable fact that the first iftsalt of the open-shelf has 
been a much smaller circulation than a theorist would expect. 
There are however, several reasons for this, each of which is 
gratifying to those considering the genuine g6od of the library. 
It is a well established fact that the total number of readers in 
public libraries fluctuates according to the financial condition of 
the country. The small number of unemployed in our city 
during the past year has been proven at the registration desk. A 
somewhat smaller number of new members has been accompanied, 
nevertheless, by an increase in circulation, and this increase has 
come entirely from those books which usually require for their 
reading several times as long as would a book of fiction. 

The appended tables show the relative gain and loss for five 
years past. The gain in ** classes,'* or the more solid reading, has 
of course been a direct result of free access to the books. The 
reading in certain lines is easily accounted for, the great amount 
of sociology in 1896, for instance. In other lines a large gain is 
on account of some interest not explainable even to the most 
observant. The large gain in fine arts (700) is due to the several 
classes and clubs stud3dng painting and ardiitecture. The gain in 
science is only another step in the steady annual increase for five 
years past, the most probable cause of which would seem to 
be the study of science in all grades of the public schools. 
The lai^ge number of readers who have chosen philosophy and 
religion this past year is very likely a ftiir count of those who 



UPORT OF UBlUJtlAN. I3 

would have been glad of these books in previous years had there 
been adequate lists at their disposal. Books in these classes are 
obviously difficult to choose through the mind of another. 

While the £dling off in fiction and juvenile is without doubt 
due almost entirely to open shelves, it is due in a measure 
also to the unsatis&ctory condition of the fiction as well as to the 
imperfect finding lists. No lists of fiction have been printed since 
1894, and many books have been worn out and found out of print. 
During the past year an unusual number have been discarded 
because of imi>erfections, and it has been impossible to supply the 
demand for old fiction as well as new. 

To the reference room the loss has been a gain. Readers now 
consult a vast number of books at the shelf or in the reading 
room. Formerly many of these books were taken to the reference 
room only for consultation and decision for borrowing. At 
present the figures for the reference room denote the work legit- 
imately belonging to that department, a condition next to impos- 
sible upon the old plan of working. 

There remain from the inventory of the classes taken last 
year fifty-one books not accounted for from the two hundred and 
thirty then missing. There are to be added to this, thirty-eight 
delinquent books thus far unpaid for by either borrower or guar- 
antor. In the juvenile department there were seventy-five missing 
in a checking made in October last, making a total of one hundred 
and sixty-four that may be counted lost or missing during the past 
year. It is however, a curious fact that a good proportion of these 
books may reappear. It is not impossible^ even though both card 
holder and guarantor have proven irresponsible, that the volumes 
fall into honest hands, and the library marks will then bring 
them back to us. 

The new delivery station at the Stimson Lafayette Industrial 
School established by the Board in October, promises very well. 
The work is done largely with the members of a mother's dub 
connected with the institution and the circulation increases week 
by week. Most of the books requested relate to home life and 
domestic economy. 

There remains to me to assure the Board that the force has, as 
a unit, been devoted to the best interests of the library, and I feel 
confident that the enthusiam will continue. 

I take this opportunity also to thank the Board for the many 
courtesies which have been extended to me as librarian. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harriet Chii^d Wadi^sigh. 



L08 ANGBI^BS PUBUC LIBRARY. 



APPENDIXES, 



A, Los Angeles Public Library Training Class. 

B. Periodicals and Donations. 

C Tabulated report of circulation. 

D. Officers of the Los Angeles Public Library , arranged 
chronologically. 



APPBNDDC H. 15 



> 



Training Class. 



^ Asofldatloii The Boafd of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Libimry 

•ad ot^ccft otgsnized a class for training pupils in the elements of libiary 
science, November, 1891. In October 1891, the following rules 
were adopted by the board : Voted: 

"That previous to being given paid employment all appli- 
cants be required to take a course of training not to exceed six 
months; examination of candidates shall be held at stated 
intervals, these examinations to be general in character, aiming 
only to determine whether by previous education and natural 
adaptability the applicant is warranted in imdertaking library 
work; that satisfactory evidence of such qualifications being 

' given, the candidates be accepted, provided they shall not be under 

seventeen years of age, and ahall have filed a written application 
agreeing to serve four hours daily without salary for a period of 
six months." 

Applicants are expected to have a high school education or its 
equivalent, and are advised to be especially &miliar with general 
history and literature, as well as current events. 
ifa ^ The six who stand highest in this preliminary examinatioa 

constitute a training class. They at ohce report for duty, and are 
through their whole course of study under the same rules that 
govern the library staff proper. A separate schedule of duties is 
made out for the class. An account is kept of all absences and 
tardinesses, with their causes. 

COURSE OP STUDY. 

FIRST TBB.M. 

X. Classification : months z and 2, Mon., Wed., Pri. 

2. Cataloging: '* 3 and 4, " 

3. Bibliography: •* 5, '* " " 

4. Reference: " 6. *' " •* 

5. Miscellaneous topics throughout the term Tuesdays ailA 
Thursdays, on the following subjects, except where indicated iMi^ 
lesson each: 



X6 LOS AKOBI«8S FDBI4C I^IBRARY. 



General talkB by the staff on the work of each department ; 
Qnalifications of a librarian ; Note taking ; Library handwriting 
and typewriting; Technical library literature; Library schools 
and training classes ; Library stamps, marks and mechanical treat- 
ment of books; Binding and mending (four lessons); Accession- 
ing (two lessons); Shelf listing; Care of books on the shelves; 
Public documents (three lessons); Pamphlets; Periodicals; 
Forms of catalogs ; Samples, clippings and portraits ; Loan sys- 
tems (four lessons); History of books and libraries (six lessons); 
Traveling libraries, home and settlement libraries, etc.; Library 
legislation; School libraries; Children's department; Library 
architecture (two lessons); Special collections ; Selection of books 
(four lessons); Ordering books (two lessons); Reports and statis- 
tics ; Duty and copyright on books ; Care of maps, music and 
plates ; Bulletins and library advertising. 

Instruction is given chiefly by lectures one hour in length, 
supplemented by such texts as Fletcher, Public libraries in 
America; Dana, Public library handbook; Plummer, Hints to 
small libraries; Dewey, Decimal classification; Library school 
mles ; Cutter, Rules for a dictionary catalog ; etc. It is intended 
that an average of two hours' work be given by the pupil to each 
lesson. 

A thesis of not less than one thousand words is required on 
some subject of library economy selected by the pupil and 
approved by the committee, and submitted on the day of the final 
examination. 

All instruction in this term is based upon systems and methods 
in use in this library. Toward the close of the term, visits are 
made to libraries in neighboring towns. 

SBCOMD TBRM. 

Courses i and 2 of first term continued with a study of 
systems other than those in use in this library. 

Courses 3 and 4 of first term continued. 

Special attention is paid to comparative methods of subjects 
covered in course 5 of first term. Library blanks of some fifty 
libraries are studied, and an individual collection is made by each 
pupil. 

A thesis of not less than fifteen hundred words is required on 
some subject of library economy selected by the pupil and 
approved by the committee; also a bibliography or annotated 
reading list upon some subject of general interest, both submitted 
on the day of the final examination. 



AFP8NDXZ A. 17 



nBHBBRS OP TRAINING CLASSES. 

First. May 17, 1892 : Bertha Pierce, Harriet Mercer, Leila 
Kingsley. 

Skcond. Augnat 5, 1893 : Nora Miller, Florence Thombaxg, 
Anna D. Austin. 

Third. December zo, 1893 : Bmma J. Whittier, Anna Beck- 
ley, Daisy Pox. 

P0US.TH. January 3, 1893 : Helen A. Neyin, Gertrude Dar- 
low, Blanche Putnam, Mabel Dunn, Mary Johnson, Edith Moore. 

FiPTH. March 32, 1894 : Pearl Gleason, Anna Barl, Georgia 
Horgan. 

Sixth. March 18, 1895 : Mabelle Hand, Amanda Mathews, 
Mabel Prentiss, Mary F. English, Ella P. True. 

Sbventh. April 15, 1896 : Mamie Bennett, Christine Clarke, 
Mae Blanchard, Jessie Young, May Keach. 

Eighth. May 37, 1897 : Rose Eberhart, Gertrude Saxton, 
Bessie Benz. 

Ninth. December 37, 1897 : Mira Jacobus, Jane B. Creigh- 
ton, Dora Mason, Fanny F. Niabet, Anna C. Long, Bertha Kane. 

Tbmth. June 29 1898. Belle Smith, Ella Morgan, Alice M. 
Hayes, Maud Whedon, Ethelwyn Fagge, Stella Flynn. 



l8 hOa ANGBtKS VUBI4IC hlBMARY. 



DAILIES. 

Atlanta Constitation ; Boston Transcript ; Chicago Tribune; 
Cincinnati Post ; Denver Republican ; Minneapolis Times ; New 
Orleans Picayune; New York Journal; New York Tribune; 
Omaha Bee ; Philadelphia Times ; Portland Oregonian ; Salt Lake 
Tribune; San Francisco Call; San Francisco Chronicle; San 
Francisco Bzaminer ; St. Louis Republican. 

WEEKLIES. 

Academy; Athenaeum; American Architect and Building 
News; American Bee Journal; American Gardening; Argonaut; 
Army and Navy; Christian Advocate; Critic: Dramatic Mirror; 
Electrical World ; Bngineering and Mining Journal ; Engineering 
News ; Farm, Field and Fireside ; Fliegende Blatter ; Graphic ; 
Harper's Bazaar; Harper's Weekly : Illustrated American ; Inde- 
pendent; Illustrated London News; Journal of Education; 
Judge; Leslie's Weekly; Life; Literary Digest; Literature; 
Littell's Living Age ; Mining and Scientific Press ; Musical Cou- 
rier ; Nation ; National Single Tazer ; Nature ; Notes and Queries ; 
Outlook; Pacific Rural Press; Public Opinion; Publisher's 
Weekly ; Puck ; Punch ; Queen ; Railroad Gazette ; Saturday Re- 
view ; Science ; Scientific American ; Scientific American Supple- 
ment ; South American Journal ; Springfield Republican ; Spec- 
tator ; Times, London ; Truth ; Toronto Globe ; Ueber Land und 
Meer ; Youth's Companion. 

BI-nONTHLIES. 

American Academy of Political and Social Science ; American 
Antiquarian; American Economic Studies; American Law 
Review. 

BI-WEEKLIES. 

Chap Book; Dial; Electrical Engineering; Gardening; 
Literary World ; Revue des Deux Mondes. 



APPBKDtZ B. 19 



MONTHLIES. 

American Anthropologist; American Electrician; American 
Historical Register; American Journal of Science; American 
Jonmal of Medical Science; American Naturalist; American 
ArchsBOlogist ; American Monthly ; Art Amateur ; Art Journal ; 
Atlantic ; Babyhood ; Bimetallist ; Birds ; Blackwood ; Book 
Buyer ; Bookman ; Business ; Catholic World ; Century ; Chamb- 
er's Journal; City Government; Charities Reyiew; Commons; 
Chautauquan ; Child Garden ; Christian Science Journal ; Con- 
temporary Review ; Cosmopolis ; Colonial Tracts ; Cosmopolitan ; 
Critic ; Current Literature ; Cumulative Index ; Decorator and 
Furnisher; Delineator; Demorest; Eclectic; Education; Engin- 
eering Magazine ; Espafia Modema ; Etude ; Figaro ; Pancieis' 
Monthly; Fortnightly Review; Forum; Geological Magazine; 
Godey ; Geographical Journal ; Good Health ; Good Housekeep- 
ing; Harper; Harper's Round Table; Inland Printer; Inter- 
national Studio ; Irrigation Age ; Journal of Botany ; Journal of 
Franklin Institute; Kindergarten; Knowledge; Law Notes; 
Ladies' Home Jonmal ; Library Journal ; Lippincott ; Little 
Men and Women ; McClure ; Money ; Music ; National Bimetal- 
list ; National Review ; Nautilus ; New England Magazine ; New 
Time ; Nineteenth Century ; North American Review ; Open 
Court; Outing; Overlcmd; Pall Mall; Photographic Times; 
Popular Science Monthly ; Progress ; Public Libraries ; Review of 
Reviews ; St. Nicholas ; Scribner ; Short Stories ; Scientific Amer- 
ican (Builders' ed.); Student's Journal ; Theosophical Review; 
Teachers' Institute; Universal Brotherhood; Traveler; West- 
minster Review. 

QUARTERLIES. 

Academy of Natural Scence ; American Geographical Society ; 
American Historical Review ; AmericSn Journal of Archeology ; 
Americal Statistical Association; Auk; Cyclopedic Review of 
Current History; Edinburgh Review; International Journal of 
Ethics ; Johns Hopkins UniverBity Studies ; Joumsl of American 
Folk Lore ; Manual of Conchology ; Mind ; Monist ; Municipal 
Affiiirs ; Palestine Exploration Fund ; Pedagogical Seminary ; 
Poet Lore; Public Ownership Review; Political Science Quar^ 
terly ; Quarterly Review ; University Chronicle. 

5Eni-ANNUAL. 

Braithwaitcs' Retrospect. 



20 JjOS ANGBUtS PUBUC UBRART. 



DONATIONS 



BOOKS AND PAilPHLETS. 

Aberdeen Public Library; AdamB, Mrs. Charles Kendall; 
Agnilar Free Library ; Alabama, University of; Amherst College ; 
Ann Arbor High School; Appel, Wm. ; Arizona, University of; 
Armour Institute ; Atlantic University ; Augusta Public Schools ; 
Baker, John ; Bangor Public Library ; Barlow, C. A.; Battersea 
Public Library; Belmont School; Berea College; Bimetallic 
League ; Birmingham Free Library ; Birtwell, Charles W.; 
Blades, Paul H.; Bodkin, Rev. P. H.; Bootle Free Library; 
Boston Public Library; Boston University; Bowdoin College; 
Bristol Public Library; Brookline Public Library; Brooklyn 
Library; Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute; Brown University; 
Br3m Mawr College ; Buffalo Public Library ; Buffiulo Historical 
Society ; Buffiilo Society of Natural Sciences ; Buffiilo Board of 
Education ; Butte High School ; Byram, Charlotte Wheeler ; Cali- 
fornia Academy of Sciences ; California Society of Sons of the 
Revolution; California, University of; California State Normal 
Schoo], San Jos^ ; California State Normal School, Los Angeles ; 
CaliforniaStateNormal School, Chico; Cambridge Public Library; 
Cardiff Free Library ; Carnegie Library, Pittsburg ; Catholic 
University ; Cawston, Edwin ; Chaffee College ; Channing, Walter, 
M.D.; Chase, Walter G.; Chicago; Chicago, University of ; Chicago 
College of Law ; Chicago Public Library ; Cincinnati College of 
Music ; Cincinnati Public Library ; Cleveland Public^ Schools ; 
Colorado, University of; Columbia University; Concord Free Public 
Library ; Concord Superintendent of Schools ; Congress, Librarian 
of; Cornell University; Council Bluffs Free Public Library; 
Coxe, Virginia Rosalie ; Croydon Public Library ; Crunden, F. M.; 
Curtner Seminary ; Dayton Public Library ; D'Cwitz, Paul ; De 
La Bacry, Mile. CL; Denver Public Schools ; Denver City Library; 
Detroit Public Library; Dobinson, G. A.; Dundee Free Library; 
Drezel Institute ; English Classical School ; Enoch Pratt Free 
Library; Evanston Free Public Library; Field Columbian 
Museum; Fint Church of Christ ; Fiake, Geo.; Foote, Allen R.; 



APPBNDIZ B. 21 



Forbes Library ; Gallinger, Hon. Jacob H.; Georgia, University of; 
Girard College ; Gold Standard Defence ; Gold Standard Associ- 
ation ; Goodwin, G. H. A.; Grand Rapids Public Schools ; Grand 
Rapids Library; Gray, Edward McQueen; Hsmilton Public 
Library; Hamilton College; Hammersmitli Public Library; Hand, 
CUfford N. ; Hartford Free Library ; Hartford Public Library ; 
Hartford Bureau of I^bor Statistics ; Harvard College ; Etayden, 
John J.; Hazard, Geo. W.; Healdsburg College; Helena Public 
Library ; Henderson, Hon. D. B.; Hershey, Mira ; Hobart College; 
Hoboken Free Public Library ; Howard Memorial Library ; 
Hucks, Julius; Idaho, University of; IHinois Bureau of Labor 
Statistics; Illinois, University of; Indian Rights Association; 
Indii^ Industrial School ; Indiana, University of ; Interstate Com- 
merce Commission ; Ithaca Public Schools ; James, G. Wharton ; 
Jenkins, C. Francis ; Jersey City Free Public Library ; Johns 
Hopkins University ; John Crerar Library ; Jones, B. W.; Elansas 
State Agricultural College; Kansas, University of; Kentucky Poly- 
technic Society ; Kinney, Abbot ; Knox College ; Lafayette Col- 
lege ; Lake Mohonk Conference ; Lasell Seminary ; Lehigh Uni- 
versity; Leipidger, Henry M., Ph. D.; Leland Stanford, Jr., 
University; Liberty and Property Defence League, London; 
Lincoln Public Schools ; Liverpool Public Library; Lordsburg 
College; Los Angeles Girls' Collegiate School; Los Angeles 
Public Schools ; Los Angeles Herald ; Los Angeles Law School ; 
Los Angeles Board of Trade ; Los Angeles Military Academy ; 
Los Angeles Marlborough School ; Los Angeles St. Vincent's Col- 
lege; Los Angeles Occidental College; Lowell City Library; 
Lunt, H. C; Lynn Public Library ; McDonough, John C; Man- 
chester Free Public Library; Manson, Marsden C. E.; Mar- 
burg, Theodore; Maryland, University of; Massachusetts 
Historical Society; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
Mathews, G. E. & Co.; Mechanics and Tradesmen, Society 
of; Michigan, University of; Mills College; Milwaukee 
Public Library; Minneapolis Board of Education; Minnesota, 
University of; Minneapolis PubUc Library ; Miss Head's School ; 
Missouri Botanical Garden; Missouri, University of; Montana, 
University of; Montclair Free Public Library, New Jersey ; Munn 
&Co.; Nagle,JohnT.; Nebraska State Historical Society ; Neb- 
raska, University of; Nevade State University; Newark Free Public 
Library ; New Bedford Free Public Library ; Newberry Library ; 
New England Conservatory of Music, Boston ; New Haven Free 
Public Library ; New Haven Public Schools ; New Jersey Labor 
Bureau ; New Jersey State College ; New Mexico, University of ; 
Newton Free Library; New Orleans, University of; New York Mer- 



32 LOS ANGBLBS FUBUC UBRARY. 



oantile Library ; New York Farmers ; New York State Botanist ; 
New York Piaheries, Game and Forest Commissions ; New York 
State Historian ; New York Ptiblic Library ; New York State Char- 
ities Aid ; New York Labor Burean ; New York Public Schools ; 
New York, University of; New York Free Circulating Library ; 
North Carolina, University of; North Dakota, University of; 
Norwich Public Library ; Oakland Free Library ; Oakland Public 
Schools; Ohio Labor Bureau ; Ohio, University of; Oklahoma Uni- 
versity ; Olmstead, Dwight H. ; Omaha Public Library ; Omaha Pub- 
lic Schools; Oregon, University of; Ome, R. M.; Osterhout Free 
Library; Palmer, Mrs. Chas. P.; Pasadena; Pasadena Classical 
School for Bo3rs; Paterson Free Public Library ; Pennsylvania, Uni- 
versity of; Peoria Public Library ; Petersborough Public Library 
Philadelphia Free Library; Philadelphia Library Company 
Philadelphia Mercantile Library ; Philadelphia Friends' Library 
Philadelphia Hamilton School; Philadelphia Public Schools 
Phillips Exeter Academy ; Portland Public Library ; Post, R. A. ; 
Pratt Institute Free Library ; Princeton Univexsity ; Providence 
Public Library; Providence School Committee; Quebec Public 
Schools ; Quincy Public Schools ; Reform Club ; Rhodes, Ben.; 
Riverside Daily Press ; St. George's Public Library ; St. Giles' 
Public Library ; St. Joseph's Free Public Library ; St. Louis 
Merchants' Ezdiange ; St. Louis Public Schools ; St. Louis Mer- 
cantile Library; St I/>uis Public Library ; St. Martin-in-the-Fields 
and St Paul Covent Garden Free Public Library ; St Paul Public 
Library ; Sadler, Ralph ; Salem Public Library ; Salt Lake Free 
Public Library; San Bernardino County Superintendent of 
Schools ; San Francisco Board of Supervisors ; San Francisco 
Mechanics Institute ; San Francisco Free Public Library ; San 
Francisco Mercantile Library ; San Francisco Superintendent of 
Schools; Santa Ana Free Public Library; Santa Ana Public 
Schools ; Santa Clara College ; Santa Rosa High School ; Scranton 
Public Library ; Search, P. W.; Seattle Public Library ; Sheffield 
Free Public Library ; Sheldon, W. L.; Shepard, Mrs. F. W. de ; 
Smithsonian Institution ; Snyder, Z. L. ; Sohn, Hein Mercy ; South- 
em California Historical Society; Southern California Tieachers 
Association ; Southern California, University of; Springfield City 
Library ; Steward, J. F.; Stockton Public Library ; Stone, Miss 
Pearl ; Syracuse Central Library ; Texas, University of; Thick- 
stun, J. C; Thomas Crane Public Library; Throop Polytechnic 
Institute; Toronto Public Library; Toronto Public Schools; 
Tufts Library ; Tulane University ; U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture ; U. S. Department of Interior ; U. S. Bureau of Labor ; U. S. 
Department of Treasury ; U. S. Department of War ; U. S. Military 



AFP8NDIZ B. a3 



Academy ; U. S. Naval Academy; U. S. Snperintendent of Docu- 
ments ; University of the Pacific ; Upeala Kongl. Universitat ; Utah, 
University of; Vermont, University of; Virginia, University of; 
Wadleigh, H. C.; Warren County library ; Washington, Univer- 
sity of; Wellesley College; Wells College; Welpee, W. P.; 
Wesle3ran University ; White, Stephen M.; Wigan Pree Public 
Library ; Wilhartitz, A.; William and liary College ; Williams 
College ; Wilmington Institute ; Winona Public Schools ; Wis- 
consin Historical Society ; Wisconsin, University of; Wisconsin 
Free Library Commission ; Wolverhampton Free Library ; Wor- 
cester Free Public Library ; Yale University ; Y. M. C. A., New 
York. 



24 



I«OS ANGBI,9S PUBUC LIBRARY. 



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1,03 ANGBLBS PUBUC I^IBRARY. 



MONTHLY CIRCULATION. 



1807-1896. 


Home 


Eeuding 
Room 


Total 


Refer'nce 


Custelur 


Grand 
Total 


Dw?ffinbcr«»»...». 


86,409 
86,648 
88,206 
86,141 
88,782 
82,149 
80.641 
81,969 
88.889 
81.288 
84.888 
88,626 


1O30O 

10321 

10,827 

11.241 

12.577 

11.877 

0.880 

0.008 

0.472 

10374 

10367 

10,170 


47,200 
46,464 
48.682 
47.882 
46.860 
48.826 
80.960 
41.687 
42361 
41.618 
46.600 
48.786 


2.779 
8,087 
2378 
1,061 
2362 
2,624 
1,002 
1.648 
8,878 
8,129 
2.708 
8316 


147 
160 
U6 
166 
180 
147 
162 
164 
192 
187 
184 
171 


60,186 


jAUIUtfy.. .• (MMM 

PcbnuiTy • • >•••••• 

ICat^L. 


40.661 
46320 
40300 


Apnl ...... ....MM. 


48361 


ICay 

June ^. 

July 


46.497 
41,994 
48.489 


August 


46^426 


September 

October 


44.928 
48.682 




47382 


TotaU 


402,924 


127,878 


680397 


81,912 


1,666 


668,874 



AFPBNDIZ C. 



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28 UOS ANGBLBS PUBLIC XJB&A&Y. 



OFFICERS 



or THE 



Los Angeles Public Library. 

Arranged chronologically. 



LIBRARIANS. 

I^ittleficld, J. C Dec., 1872— Jan., 1879 

Connolly, P .Jan., 1879— Jnnc, 1880 

Foy, Mary E .June, 1880— Jan., 1884 

Gavitt, Jessie A Jan., 1884— Jan., 1889 

Prescott, Lydia A .Jan., 1889— Apr., 1889 

Kels9, Tessa L Apr. x, 1889— May i, 1895 

Fowler, Clara B May i, 1895— June 15, 1897 

Wadleigh, Harriet Child June 15, 1897 



FIRST BOARD OP DIRECTORS. 

A^FOINTKD PKCKHBBR, ItTS. 

J. G. Downey, IVesidenL Harris Newmark. 

S. B. Caswell. Y. Sepulveda. 

H. K. W. Bent W. H. Mace. 

Col. Geo. H. Smith. A. W. Potts. 

Gen. Geo. Stoneman. T. W. Temple. 

W. B. Ivawler. R. H. Dalton. 



APPENDIX D. 



^9 



DIRECTORS 1889-1898. 



DoUnson, G. A 1889-1895 

Howard, P. H 1889-1895 

Hanchette, H. Jay....i88^x89X 

Jones, B. W 1889-189X 

Dayies, J. M 1889-1893 

Severance, MrB.C.M..i89T-i893 
Smith, Col. Geo. H...1891-1893 

Borden, Sheldon 1893-1895 

Hamilton, W. J 1893-1895 

Spalding, W. A 1893-1895 



Bonetxrake, Geo. H.... 1895- 1897 

Flint, F.P X895-1897 

0*MelYeny, H. W 1895-1897 

Stewart, Geo. H 1895-1897 

Stom, H. E 1895-1897 

Dockweiler, Isidore B 1897 

Bnrbank, W. P. 1897 

Foster, Ernest K 1897 

Garland, W. M 1897 

Rogers, Earl 1897 



ATTeNOANT5. 

Gayitt, Jessie A April z, 1889— Feb. i, 1890. 

Marquis, Barton Apr. i, 1889— Sept i, 1889. 

Haines, Bstelle Sept. i, 1889— May i, 1895. 

Hssse, Adelaide R Sept. i, 1889— May x, 1895. 

Wellman, Mrs. Eva A.... Sept. x, 1889— June 5, 1891. 

Fenner, Lena B Sept. 9, X889— June x, X893. 

Gleason, Celia Dec. x, X889. 

Longstreet, MameP Dec x, 1889 — ^Apr. x, X890. 

Bumiller, Emma Jan. 7, 1890 — Mar. x, X890. 

Rnss, Nellie M... Feb. 3, X890— Jan. i, 1898. 

Beville, Blanche Aug. 3, 1890 — Oct. x, X893. 

Clarke, M. E Aug. 3, X890— Nov. 9, X890. 

Avery, Zora. Nov. 17, X890— Dec. 31, x89a 

Fargo, Elizabeth Nov. X9, 1890. 

Kimball, Helen L Nov. 30, x890--Sept. x, 1893. 

Logan, Margaret Apr. 27, X89X— Oct. x, 1893. 

Walker, Stella. May X4, X89X— Nov. 30, X894. 

Hendricks, Ida. May 25, X891— Sept. 25, X89X. 

*Wise, Corinne. June 29, X89X. 

Tedford, Martha S Sept. X4, X891— July x, X896. 

Kingsley, Cordelia May 23, X892 — ^Aug. x, X896. 

Mercer, Harriet May 23, X892— Apr. x, X897. 

Pierce, Bertha E May 23, X892— July x, X896. 

Miller, Nora A Aug. 8, X892. 

Thombuxg, Florence Aug. 8, X892. ' 

Austin, Anna D Aug. 9, X892 — Sept. x, X89S. 

Darlow, Gertrude July xo, X893. 

•Deceased June IB, 1806. 



30 LOS ANGBI«B8 PUBLIC UBRAKY. 

tNevin, Helen .Jnly lo, 1893. 

Patnam, Blanche A July 10, 1893. 

Beckley, Anna Ang. i, 1893. 

Johnson, Mary Not. i, 1893. 

Dunn, Mable Mar. 8, 1894. 

Oleason, Pearl Sept i, 1894. 

Moore, Edith Sept i, 1894. 

Horgan, Georgia. Oct i, 1894. 

Earl, Anna Dec. i, 1894— Jan. i, 1896. 

Hand, Mabelle Jnne i, 1895— Not. 3, 1898. 

Prentiaa, Mabel Oct i, 1895— Apr. i, 1898. 

Bennett, Mamie. May i, 1896. 

Blanchard, Mae D .July i, 1896. 

Clarke, Christine Jnly 31, 1896. 

Yonng, Jessie M Sept. 18, 1896. 

Keach, May Mar. 26, 1897. 

Eberhart, Rose May 27, 1897. 

Benx, Bessie Apr. i, 1898. 

Saxton, Gertrude Apr. i, 1898. 

Jacobus, Mira Apr. i, 1898. 

Mason, Dora May i, 1898. 

Nisbet, Frances May x, 1898. 

I^ng, Anna .June i, 1898. 

Kane, Bertha. .June i, 1898. 

t Resigned Peb. & 1W4. to act as librarian at Redlanda. Returned to I«o» 
Angdcs Library Sept. 18, 1806. 



V 



w. • ■ • I r— ^ 



> r,< .J -/.t J. V 



I 
P 



Los Angeles Public Library 

1 



?; 



Annual Report 



of the 



Board OF Directors 



and 



Librarian 



1898-1899 






tl . 



Y 



LOS ANGELES ^PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Board of Directors 



AND OF THE 



LIBRARIAN 



December i, 1898— November p, 1899 



'fe i 4-sq.l.2. 




^)fV/^ ^^ 



jfitAM 



COMMBRCIAL PRINTINO HOUSB 
Z90O 



Los Angeles Public Library 



DIRECTORS. 



P. K. Rui,B, President, 

M. J. NSWMARK, Vice President, 

W. B. Mathews, Secretary, 

H. W. 0*M«i,VKNY. 

F. J. Thomas. 



COMMITTEES. 



Attendants: W. B. Mathbws, F. J. Thomas. 
Auditing and Accounts: M. J. Nkwmark, F. J. Thomas. 
Books and Donations: H. W. O'Mrlvbny, W. B. MaThbws. 
Printing and Supplies: F. J. Thomas, M. J. Nbwmark. 
Rules and Administration: F. J. Thomas, W. B. Mathbws. 
The Preadent is a member of all committees. 



Harribt Chiij) Wadi^igh, Librarian and Clerk of the Board. 
Cbi<ia Gi^bason, First Assistant Librarian, 

Mary I^. Jonbs, Second Assistant Librarian, 



PRINCIPALS OF DEPARTMENTS, 



Nora A. Mn:,i«BR, Registration, 
Fi«ORBNCB Thorkburg, Scbool, 
HBijeN A. Nbvin, Cataloging, 
GbrTrudb Darix>w, Classi£cation. 
Bi«ANCH Putnam, Juvenile. 
Anna BBCKIAy, Reference. 
Mabbi^ Dunn, Fiction. 
Mary Johnson, Accession, 
Edith Moorb, Mail. 



GENERAL ATTENDANTS. 



PBARI, Gl^BASON BBSSIB BBNZ BI«I«A MORGAN 

Gborgia Horgan Mira Jacobus Maud Whbdon 

Mamib Bbnnbtt Dora Mason Ethblwyn Faggb 

ChRISTINB Cl«ARKB FRANCBS NiSBBTT JoSBPHINB DaN- 

Mab Blan chard Anna Ia>ng castbr 

May Kbach Bbrtha Kanb Clara Hindi«b 

RosB Kbbrhart Bbu:* Smith Victoria Ellis 



Dbnnis Johnson, Janitor. 

Hannah Cronin, Cleaner. 




P\jWt OF PVELIC LlBRARX 
.LL5, CAL!Pt)R;iIA, 




Ge/ieral" 
Los A/1C 



^^luJjpk JmIms^ 




CRAL RtAOVIG Rxy\ 



AXmf 




Raa of FVblc Lii 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

OP THE 

Los Angeles Public Library 



DECBnBBR. 1899. 



To the Council of the City of Los Angeles: 

Gsntlbmsn: The Board of Directors of the Public Lib- 
rary' have the honor to present herewith their Annual Report 

The Board took office on March 31st last. We found the civil 8«rvl< 
affairs of the library in charge of a capable staff and proceeding 
smoothly along lines laid down by previous administrations. It is 
highly creditable to our city that its charter has withdrawn this 
branch of the municipal government from the arena of politics, by 
providing that the attendants shall not he discharged except for 
good cause. With the law thus protecting them in their positions, 
and the Training School of the library supplying all recruits for 
the general staff, we have here, as the inevitable result, a working 
force which is pre-eminent in the service of the city for the 
character, capability and efficiency of its members. 

At the outset of our administration we discovered, what, no 
doubt, was realized by our predecessors, that the principal duty of 
the Board of Directors is to make the inadequate revenues of the 
library go as far as possible toward meeting the demands and 
expectations of the reading public. Strict economy in the ex- 
penditure of money was accordingly adopted as the policy of 
the Board, and has been uniformly adhered to. All books and 
supplies are bought at the lowest prices, as determined by per- 
sonal inquiry, and, as far as practicable, by competitive bidding. 



I«OS ANGBI.BS PUBI«IC LIBRARY 



&^^^S^ The library session of the National Educational Associa- 

N. E. A. ^^^°> which met in this city last July, was held in the Council 

Chamber the afternoon of the 13th and 14th of that month, 
pursuant to arrangements made by the librarian. Mrs. Wadleigh. 
Miss Mary L. Jones, assistant librarian, was the representative 
of this institution on the program for that occasion. In the 
evening of the 13th the members of the Board, the librarian 
and her assistants received the public at the library rooms, in 
honor of the visiting delegates. 

A. L. A. Miss Celia Gleason, assistant librarian, was a delegate to the 

Conference of the American Library Association held at Atlanta, 
Georgia, in May last Miss Gleason attended the Conference 
as the representative of this library and while absent in the East 
visited several of the more prominent libraries. 

Bnnch On the i6th of June last, the Board acting in conjunction 

90MllngRooiB^i^ the Board of Education, opened a branch reading 
room with a lecture room annex, at the comer of Macy and 
Garibaldi Streets, in a building formerly used ,for school pur- 
poses. Under the plan adopted this Board furnishes the at- 
tendant, supplies the necessary books for the reading room, and 
keeps it open every day (except Sundaays and holidays) from 
6 P. M. to 9:30 P. M. This step was taken to meet certain 
special conditions existing in the Macy Street neighborhood, and 
it has been attended with a gratifying degree of success. 

Pladinr Lift A new finding list for fiction has been authorized and is in 

course of preparation by attendants in the Library. It is expected 
to be ready for printing by July ist next. 

P*aiteen Day The privilege of renewal given to borrowers of fourteen day 
books has been restricted by an amendment to the rules, subject- 
ing the older popular books of fiction to classification as "four- 
teen day books, non-renewable." This was done in the interest of 
accelerated circulation. 

The utter inadequacy of our supply of books for home use is 
more sorely felt in the fiction department than elsewhere. The 
income of the library will not justify the purchase of more than a 
dozen copies of any popular novel, and for a period of many 
months these will only supply about five per cent of the demand. 
For the purpose of partially relieving this condition, the Board 
has recently created a class of reservable books, embracing works 
of fiction which are in great popular demand. Rules and regula- 
tions have been adopted providing that any member of the lib- 
rary may have a book of this class reserved for his use by paying 



RBPORT OF THB BOARD OP DIRSCTORS 



five cents, and leaving his name and address upon a postal card 
famished by the library for that purpose. When the book de- 
sired becomes available the card is mailed to the applicant Books 
for this class are limited in nnmber and are simply "extras", 
supplementing, in a degree, the supply provided out of the general 
fondsof the Library. Books for the "reserved class", are pur- 
chased out of the fund created by the fees charged. 

The Library's collection of pictures of library buildings has Uhnry 

been loaned to the authorities at Tucson, Arizona, for use in PIctaws 

deciding upon a plan for a new library building in that city. 

The Board would gratefully acknowledge the generosity of Doaatloas 
many friends who have donated books to the library during the 
past year. 

The needs of the library are the needs of the entire commun- Our Needs 
ity. They are constant and ever increasing. However, we will 
only mention two, viz: more books and a suitable library building. 
The need of more books is strikingly illustrated by statistics at 
hand showing that the library has at present 828 volumes of fiction 
less than it had five years ago, notwithstanding the fact that during 
that period the accessions to fiction numbered 4469 volumes. This 
loss is due to failure to make good the wear and tear of use. More 
books means more money and the financial difficulty thus present- 
ed is entitled to the serious consideration of the Council. They 
could do more for the library than they have been doing. The 
charter makes it their duty to provide for levying and collecting 
an annual tax on all taxable property in the city "sufficient to 
maintain the library, not to exceed five cents on each $100 of 
valuation." The library is not being maintained and the limit 
prescribed by the charter is not being exhausted. One or the 
other of these conditions should be fulfilled. 

The need of a library building in this city is absolutely im- Ubrwr 

perative. The maintenance of the library in its present quarters BalMlBf 

violates every idea of appropriateness and convenience. Located 
on the third floor of a public building used as the headquarters 
of the City Government and in the principal business block of Los 
Angeles, it is difficult of access and is constantly enveloped in 
noise and tumult The city provides houses for its fire companies 
and buildings for its schools, but gives its library hardly more 
than mere shelter. We realize that, so long as the city charter 
remains unchanged, nothing can be expected from public funds 
for the purpose of acquiring a library building. It is our hope. 



IXM ANGBI<9S PUBUC LIBRARY 



however, that oar lamentation on this point may reach the ear of 
private beneficence. 

The need of a suitable public library building in this city is 
nothing more or less than the opportunity of the noble hearted 
and broad minded men of large means residing here to devote 
a part of their fortune to the great and lasting benefit of their 
fellow citizens. We earnestly commend to them the words of 
James Russell Lowell. 

''There is no way in which a man can build so secure and 
lasting a monument for himself as in a public library. Upon that 
he may confidently allow 'Resurgam* to be carved, for through his 
good deed he will rise again in the grateful remembrance and in 
the lifted and broadened minds and fortified characters of gener- 
ation after generation*" 

Respectfully submitted, 

FsRD. E:. Rui^, President, 

M. J. Nbwbcark, 

P. J. Thomas, 

H. W. 0*Mm»v«NBY, 

W. B. MaThbws. 



Report of Librarian. 

1898-1899. 



To the Board of Directors oftbt Los Angeles Public Library: 

GknTlSmsn: — I have the honor to submit the eleventh 
annnal report of the I^os Angeles Public Library, covering the 
year ending November 30, 1899. 

The City Council apportioned to the Library fund for the 
current fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, the sum of twenty-«ix 
thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars, ($26,850.00) being a 
levy of three and eigthty-nine hundredths cents on each one hund- 
red dollars, on all the taxable property in the city. The maxim- 
um rate fixed by the city charter is five cents on each one hundred 
dollars and this would have given the library for the current year 

132,737.92. 

The receipts and expenditures of the library fund for the year 
ending November 30, have been as follows: 

CA5H RECEIPTS, 1898-1899. 

Cash on hand from 1897-1898 $ 8,297.37 

Received balance of apportionment 1898-99 10,915.20 

Received on apportionment, 1899-1900 14,231.98 

Fines ; 1,162.25 

Dues .4 12.50 

Books and Magazines lost and paid for (87)... 82.42 

Findings Lists sold 13.10. 

Supplies, etc. sold 12.85 

Duplicate books sold 2.25 

Damaged books paid for 1.50 

Damaged Magazine cover paid for .10 

$34,731.42 



8 h03 ANGBI/BS PUBI«IC I^IBRAJLY. 



CASH BXPBNDITURB5 1896-99. 

Books $ 3,960.17 

Pttiodicals ii33i-9i 

Binding I1632.34 

$ 6.924.42 

Lost books retomed and money 

refunded (21) ^-oo 

Insurance 210.00 

Sundries expense $ 407.46 

Postage , 191*35 

Bzperting books 10.00 

f 608.71 

Salaries — 

Regular 4i3»374.86 

Sunday, holiday, etc 579>i6 

Janitor 600.00 

Cleaner 182.00 

' $14,636.02 

Stationery, printing and supplies ... 924.12 

Printing Annual Report 113.30 

$ 1,037.42 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

New Desk for Juvenile Dept 1 7.50 

New Remington typevniter 91.50 

New Hammond typewriter 62.00 

Catalogue case 66.25 

New book stacks 28.00 

Picture framing 40.75 

Blount door checks 13.50 

Photograph cases 22.35 

Revolving book case 11.50 

Linoleum. 31.20 

Shelf label holders 11.25 

Glass for juvenile dept. 21.00 

Moistener, etc. for letter press.. 8.25 

Miscellaneous fixtures ' 20.53 

$ 445.58 

TOTAI, EXPBNDITURRS $23,886.15 

Borrowed fund transferred $ 4,500.00 

Cash balance 6,345.27 10,845.27 

$34,731.42 $34,731.42 



REPORT OP THB LIBRARIAN 



DEPOSIT ACCOUNT. 

Receipts — 

November 30th, 1898, to balance .$146.25 

November 30th, 1899, to deposits recorded 468.70 

I614.95 
Expenditures — 

November 30th, 1899, by deposits returned 4497>30 

November 30th, 1899, by balance "7.75 

I614.95 
REGISTRATION. 

Membership Dec. i, 1898 23173 

New members during year, (Men) 1715 

" ** " ** (Women) 2434 4194 

Membership, Nov. 30, 1899 27322 

Total registration since Sept., 1889 43342 

Notices received from Health Office 1102 

Notices sent during year 7061 

Addresses changed during year 3534 

Circulation magazines in Reading Room, only 5I79X 

A new system of registration was begun in November and 
the members of Series I. for the month were 460. A regularly 
kept "delinquent list" has been added to the records, also a dupli- 
cate set of the lost card checks is now filed at this desk. 

ACCESSION DBPARTHENT. 

Number of volumes, Dec. i, 1898 49847 

" " " added during year 4556 M«l^ 0440:1 

Number of volumes discarded, (worn out) 2990 

Number of volumes lost 79 

Number of volumes, Nov. 30, 1S99 *944^61334 

Volumes prepared for bindery 3170 

Volumes mended 31382 • 

volumes discarded 2990 37542 



CLASSIFICATION AND SHELF. 

Number volumes classified and entered in shelf sheets.... !i336 

Number duplicates entered 3220 

Total number volumes added to shelves 4556 

Volumes re-classified 660 

Volumes discarded andso entered 2990 



lO I<OS ANGSI<BS PUBLIC I«IBBARY 



Voltimes lost and so entered 79 

Volumes handled daring year 82^ 

The work of reclassifying 300, Social Science, has been 
finished and 200, Religion, is well under way. 

Shelf Lists completely re-written : 

Fiction, two sets, pages 1292 

Juvenile Fiction, two sets, pages. 532 

Natural Science, pages 270 

Reference Magazine shelf list, pages 350 

Total 2244 

This department has in charge lists of new books on all 
subjects, added month by month and posted at several points about 
the library. Owing to the utter lack of printed lists of fiction, 
there was made in January, for the use of the patrons, a typewrit- 
ten bulletin of the additions to this class for the year 1898. The 
time and labor previously used in this direction are now given to 
the preparation of the new fiction list to be published during the 
present year. 

CATALOQING DEPARTilENT. 

Number volumes cataloged during year ending Nov. 30, 1899: 

(a) Classes 300-920 inclusive 2177 

(b) Class 200 239 

2416 

(c) I Fiction (new) 340 

2 Fiction (Fiction List) 379 719 

3135 

(d) Classes 000-200 inclusive (bulletin cards only) 210 

Total number of books 3345 

Approximate number cards prepared for fiction list to date 1900 

The important features of the work in this department during 
the past year have been. First, the final cataloging of Class 300^ 
Social Science. Second, the beginning of work upon the new 
fiction list. Third, the installation of an additional catalog 
case of seventy drawers, which now gives a total of 182 drawers, 
containing between 50,000 and 60,000 cards. 

Of that portion of the library remaining uncataloged, i. e., 
Classes 000 General Works, 100 Philosophy and 200 Religion, the 
latter is well under way. This work will advance somewhat slowly 
however, owing to the pressure from other departments. 



REPORT OP I^IBRARIAN II 



REFERENCE. 

Volumes added during the year 256 

Bound magazines added during year 147 

Documents added 435 

838 

Bibliographies compiled 242 

Volumes consulted 49453 

The work has in no way changed in character for the year 
past. The assistance rendered to the member of the many study 
clubs forms a considerable part of the work done in this room. To 
many of these students the collection of photographs purchased 
last year has proved most useful. A card catalog of the paintings 
represented has been completed and that of sculpture is begun. 
Critical notes on the schools, the pictures and the painters are 
included in this catalog. 

The shelf lists for documents are being revised and re-written. 
Many of the documents received during the year fill out hitherto 
incomplete sets. 

Bibliographies and reading lists prepared include the follow- 
ing, and represent somewhat the scope of work accomplished by 
the principal of this department and her assistants. 
Artists whose works are not Engineering. 

represented in photographic Filters. 

collection. Ghosts. 

Ballads. Harbors and allied subjects. 

Boers and Transvaal. Herschel, Caroline 

Bonheur, Rosa International copyright law. 

Cable, George Elipling. 

Cactus. Louvre. 

Carrol, Lewis Margaret of Anjou. 

Catherine II. Matilda of Flanders. 

Cleopatra Roman history. 

Coleridge, Sara Rossetti, Christina 

Colonial architecture Scottish minstrels. 

Cotton. Scottish superstitions. 

Dido. Sculpture. 

Elizabeth. Victoria. 

Semitic influences. Wagner. 

Shakespeare. Wireless telegraphy. 

Semiramis. Zenobia. 

United States of Columbia. 



12 LOS ANGBI3S PUBI^IC LIBRARY 



FICTION. 

Number volumes (approximate) 8000 

" •* circulated 1898-99 194367 

Books added, 1899 1373 

" discarded, 1899 \ 1654 

Net loss to department 281 

Volumes mended 13685 

Notices sent 2117 

As is usual in every circulating library, fiction is ''turned" 
more times than any other class. The above estimate, which is a 
conservative one, shows that the average circulation was nearly 
twenty times per book. As a fact, many books are not requested 
and others are called for without success hundreds of times. 

The end of the year finds this department in somewhat better 
condition than was the case a year ago, owing to the replacement 
of a portion of the vast number of discarded novels, and because 
of the new finding list in progress. Only a beginning has been 
made in this line, however, for during the past year more volumes 
have been worn out than have been bought Most of these books 
are those having a steady demand by each year's readers and 
includes such authors as Ainsworth, Besant, Black, Craik, Dumas. 
George Eliot, McDonald, Holland, Warner, Oliphant, Bulwer> 
Lytton, and many others. 

The principal of this department in her last report to me says, 
"a library of this size with the present appropriation can never 
meet the demands for new books, but it should be able to supply 
standard books,'* and then follows a carefully selected list of 
authors, a few of whose names I have quoted. 

The adaptation of the St. Louis plan of reserve books, adopted 
by the Board, will greatly relieve the pressure for new novels, and 
nothing but a generous appropriation to this department for the 
coming year will make up the arrears. 

SCHOOL AND JUVENILE. 

Number Voltmies (approximate) 6,500 

Circulation Juvenile (home) 51^613 

School (30 day books) 24,617 



II 



76,230 
The above figures show a more remarkable activity than in 



REPORT OP THS LIBRARIAN I3 



any other department except fiction, the books having been 
'*tnmed" about 11.5 times in the year. 

One may find at any time, that ideal library condition, an 
almost empty stack. But to go a point further, one also finds that 
teachers, parents and children frequently go away with empty 
hands, a condition which should not exist, much less continue. 

Many indexes and lists are made from time to time; for holi- 
days and historical events pictures are posted upon the screens, 
and many simple devices used to make the room attractive, with 
gratifjring success. Perhaps the most important lists of the year 
were those made in June and distributed to the visitors during the 
National Educational Association Convention. These leaflets 
recommend books and pictures for each grade, and were carefully 
selected for the use of the Ix>s Angeles schools. Many words of 
appreciation have been received from teachers, both at home and 
abroad. 

The most urgent need here, aside from the multiplication of 
books, is a printed finding list of this collection. 

HAIL AND PERIODICALS. 

Periodicals on file in Reading Room : 

By gift 135 

By subscription 422 

— 557 
Acknowledgements written 585 

Magazine covers made 561 

Magazines covered.. 5970 

Magazines prepared for bindery, volumes 615 

This represents but a portion* of the work covered by this 
department, as all magazines remain in its charge until they are 
bound up as books. In addition, duplicate magazines are clipped, 
the pictures are mounted and added to the collection so much used 
by the schools. 

The details of this department are innimierable and the items 
would mount up to tens of thousands. 

TRAINING CLA55E5. 

Since December i, 1898, two training classes, the eleventh 
and twelfth, have been graduated. The earlier, a class of six, 
received diplomas on the 25th of March, 1899. Of this number 
two are already on the night staff. 



14 REPORT OP THE LIBRARIAN 



The twelfth class began work on the ist of March last and 
graduated in September. This class was unusually large, as 
besides the six regular members, five special students were 
admitted. 

The assistant in charge of the training class, accompanied by 
four of this class, accessioned, classified and shelf listed the new 
Long Beach library, spending several days over the work. 

ADIVtINISTRATION. 

The changes of the year have been many in number and im- 
portant in character. The assistantship, which had been vacant 
for several months, was filled in February by the promotion of 
Miss Celia Gleason to the position of first assistant, and the elec- 
tion as second assistant of Miss Mary h. Jones, (B. L. S., New 
York State Library School, 1892.) 

Miss Dunn was promoted to the head of the fiction depart- 
ment in December, 1898. 

Miss Fargo, who since 1890 had been one of the most valuable 
members of the stafiT, was elected in September, assistant librarian 
of the Los Angeles State Normal School. 

Miss Thornburg, formerly principal of the mail department, 
:Kras transferred to the charge of the school work and Miss Moore 
was promoted to fill the vacancy in the mail department. 

Miss Young resigned in July having been a member of the 
library force since September, 1896. She had in those years won 
many friends by her uniformly cheerful and attentive service. 
The good wishes of all these friends follow her into the new life 
she has chosen. 

Miss Saxton, who had for more than two years held respon- 
sible positions in our midst, left in September to assume the duties 
of librarian at the State University of Washington. 

At the opening of the Macy Street reading room Miss Moore 
was placed in charge; her promotion was followed by the appoint- 
ment of Miss Ellis to the Macy Street work. 

Miss Blanchard was appointed day assistant to Miss Beckley, 
principal of the Reference Department, and Miss Fagge of the 
night force was placed in charge of that work during the evenings. 

There have been six advanced from the night to the day staff 
and seven have been added to the regular force from the graduates 
of the training classes. These promotions added to the ones be- 
fore mentioned makes a total of twenty-four changes for the year. 



I«OS AKGBI.SS PUBUC I^IBRARY 15 



QBNBRAL. 

The effort to systematize the work of the staff, begun last year, 
has been still farther advanced by the presentation of monthly 
Imports by the principcds of departments to the librarian. A new 
blank has been furnished for the purpose; also a form of requisition 
for supplies has been added. Bach principal makes out, fort- 
nightly, the list of materials needed; after being filled, these 
requisitions are checked and filed by departments, thus preserving 
a permanent record of the expense incurred at the various desks. 

The general results of circulation repeat the record of last 
year, when, for the first time in ten years a loss was reported. 
This loss in circulation is met in other libraries through the 
country, and various natural causes are given, the Spanish war 
being the most common. Two other local causes are worth men- 
tioning; first, the unusual and unwarranted excitement which 
attended the prevalence of smallpox in certain sections of the city 
last winter when circulation lost about 10,000 per month for 
several months. No case of contagion was reported which could 
in the remotest way have been connected with the library. 
Books found in the infected district were taken in charge by the 
Health Officer and never returned to the shelf. The second 
reason is simply the lack of books to supply the demand. Earlier 
in the report the condition of school and juvenile, and of the fiction 
departments was put before you. The simplest recognition of 
these conditions should lead to<a large increase in the purchase of 
books for these departments for the coming year. In fiction, 
where there are 828 less books now than there were five years ago, 
the best curative methods are already at work, large replacements 
of standard new and old novels, and the preparation of a new 
finding list. 

The same attention should be given to juvenile books. In 
the school department I strongly recommend buying many copies 
of the books for lower and intermediate grades, buying, in fact, 
till every teacher may have during the term's work, the books she 
most desires for supplementary reading. This should be done even 
if the bulk of the school appropriation is spent upon them. 

Although we have made an effort in that direction, we have 
had during the past year no exhibition of pictures like that of the 
Carnegie Collection so kindly loaned us and displayed in the school 
department the year before. The interest established in library 
buildings at that time is still with us. 



l6 RKFORT OF THE I,IBRARIAN 



To properly keep up with the work of the library after the 
Fiction list is published, a monthly bulletin should be issued 
which would keep old as well as new books constantly before the 
public. 

Notwithstanding the loss of circulation, the characteristics of 
the Los Angeles library are maintained. A tabulation made up 
for the statistics gathered by the Bureau of Labor for the year 
ending June 30th, 1899, shows that we continue to turn the books 
more times than other libraries with which we h ave a right to 
compare ourselves, either by population, by size of the library, or 
by extent of circulation. I haye made no comparison by appro- 
priation, for no library in the countxy is asked to do similar 
work on the same amount of money. 

In June by the co-operation of the School Board and this 
Board, a reading room was opened in the Macy Street school house. 
About 300 books were placed there with many popular periodicals. 
The work is steadily increasing and the citizens are asking that 
the room be made a regular branch. The coming year should 
accomplish this. 

Castelar Reading Room was closed for months during the 
winter. Upon re-opening larger and better quarters were given by 
the Settlement Association and the library service was doubled. 
The circulation is gaining rapidly as a result, although it is a 
quarter where more foreign books are sorely needed. 

In closing allow me to commend the stafif for earnest and 
loyal work through the year, and US thank the Boaxd for all 
courtesies received. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harriet Cbhj} Wadx,eigh. 



APPENDIXES. 

L Memoranda. 

IL Officers of the Los Angeles Public Library ar- 
ranged Chronologically. 

in. Circulation by Classes. 

IV. General Home Circulation. 

V. Comparative Statistics of Libraries in the United 
States. 

VI. Periodicals and Donations. 

VII. Report to Superintendent of Schools on School Lib^ 
rary. 



i8 



APPENDIX I. 



1872 



MEnORANDA. 

' Population of Los Angeles 10,000. 

Area of Los Angeles 17,172.37 acres. 

Assessed value of Los Angeles, $2,231,497.00 
Library established by public spirited citizens. 



<i 



11 



11 



c« 



1878 

1889 



1872 First Board of Directors appointed. 

First Librarian appointed. 

Library located in Downey Block. 

Annual Fee, $5.00. 

Memorial presented to Legislature, asking that a Public Lib- 
rary be established in the City of Los Angeles. 

Special act of Legislature enabling the City of Los Angeles 
to apportion money for maintaining Public Library. 

Mayor and Council, ex-officio Regents of Library. 

New City Charter, Board appointed by Mayor. 

Library removed from Downey Block to City Hall. 

Volumes, when moved, 6666. 

Annual fee, $4.00. 

Teachers placed on ''free list" 

Library reclassified by the Decimal Classification. 
189X Library made free. 

'* Training Class established. 
1892 Board of Education placed school libraries in custody of 

Library Board. 
1897 Library re-organized to ''free access.*' 

First bequest (Dr. Wm. A. Edgar.) 

First subscription to new building, (J. H. Jones.) 

Castelar Reading Room and delivery station opened. 

Stimson Lafayette Industrial School delivery station opened. 
1899 Macy Street Reading Room opened, carried on jointly by 
Board of Education and Library Board. 

Number of volumes, 5 1 , 334. 

Home Circulation, 3581898. 

Appropriation, $26,850,00. 



i« 



i( 



<4 



If 



11 



1899 



' Population of Los Angeles, 
Area of Los Angeles, 
Assessed value of Los Angeles, 
New Library building, erected, 



110,000. 
27,695.49 acres. 

$65,475,841.00. 

?????? 



OFFICERS 

OPTHB 

Los Angeles Public Library 

ARRANOBD CHRONOLOGICALLY. 



FIR5T BOARD OP DIRECTORS. 

Appointed Decenber, 1872. 

J. G. Downey, President. Harris Newmark. 

S. B. Caswell. Y. Scpulveda. 

H. K. W. Bent. W. H. Mace. 

Col. Geo. H. Smith. A. W. Potts. 

Gen. Geo. Stonenmn. T. W. Temple. 

W. B. Lawler. R. H. Dalton. 

DIRECTORS 1889-1899. 

Bobinson, G. A 1889-1895 Bonebrake, Geo. H....1895-1897 

Howard, F. H 1889-1895 Flint, F. P 1895-1897 

Hanchette, H. Jay 1889-1891 O'Melveny, H. W 1895-1897 

Jones, E. W 1889-1891 Stewart, Geo. H 1895-1897 

Davies, J. M 1889-1893 Storrs, H. E 1895-1897 

Severance, Mrs. C. M.1891-1893 Dockweiler, Isidore B.1897-180Q 

Smith, Col. Geo. H....1891-1893 Burbank, W. F 1897-1899 

Borden, Sheldon 1893-1895 Foster, Ernest K 1897-1809 

Hamilton, W. J 1893-1895 Garland, W. M 1897-1899 

Spalding, W. A 1893-1895 Rogers, Earl 1897-1899 



Rule, F. K 

Mathews, W. B. 



1899 

1899 

Newmark, M. J jg^^ 

0»Mclveny, H. W ...!!!....i899 

Thomas, F. J j^ 



30 JJOS ANOBI^BS PUBI«IC I«IBRARY 



LIBRARIANS. 

Littlcfield, J. C Dec, 1872-Jan. 1879 

Connolly, P. Jan., 1879-Jane 1880 

Foy, Mary E June, 1880-Jan. 1884 

GaTitt. Jessie A Jan., 1884-Jan. 1889 

Prescott, Lydia A Jan., i889r-Apr. 1889 

Kelso, Tessa Xr Apr., 1889-May 1895 

Fowler, Clara B May 1895-Jime 1897 

Wadleigh, Harriet Child June 1897 

ASSISTANT LIBRARIANS. 

Gavitt, Jessie A Apr., 1889-Peb. 1890 

Marquis, Barton H .4,. May 1889-Sept. 1889 

Basse, Adelaide R Feb. 1890-May 1895 

Fenner, Lena B Apr. 1890-June 1893 

Austin, Anna D Apr. 1895-Sept. 1898 

Gleason, Celia July 1897 

Jones, Mary L Feb. 1899 

ATTENDANTS. 

Haines, Estelle Sept., 1889-May, 1895 

Hasse, Adelaide R Sept., 1889-May, 1895 

Wellman, Era A Sept., 1889-June, 1891 

Fenner, Lena B Sept., 1889-June, 1893 

Gleason, Celia Dec, 1889 

Longstreet, Mame P Dec, 1889-Apr., 1890 

Bumiller, Emma ....Jan., 1890-Mar., 1890 

Russ, Nellie M Feb., 1890-Jan., 1898 

Beville, Blanche Aug., 1890-Oct, 1893 

Clarke, M. E Aug., 1890-Noy., 1890 

Avery, Zora Nov., 1890-Dec, 1890 

Fargo, Elizabeth Nov. 1890-Sept. 1899 

Kimball, Helen L Nov., 1890-Sept., 1893 

Logan, Margaret Apr., 1891-Oct., 1893 

Walker, Stella May, 1891-Nov., 1894 

Hendricks, Ida May, 1891-Sept., 1891 

*Wise, Corinne June 1891-June, 1898 

Tedford, Martha S Sept., 1891-July, 1896 

Kingsley, Cordelia May, 1892-Aug., 1896 

Mercer, Harriet ^ay, 1892-Apr., 1897 

•Dcc«aaedr 



APPBNDIX n. 21 



Pierce, Bertha E May, 1892-JUI7, 1896 

Miller, Nora A Aug., 1892 

Thornborg, Florence Aug., 1892 

Austin, Anna D Aug., 1892-Sept., 1898 

Darlow, Gertrude July, 1893 

Nevin, Helen J^7» 1893 

Ptttman, Blanche A July, 1893 

Beckley, Anna Aug., 1893 

Johnson, Mary Nov., 1893 

Dunn, Mabel Mar., 1894 

Moore, Edith Sept., 1894 

Gleason, Pearl Sept, 1894. 

Horgan, Georgia. Oct, 1894 

Barl, Anna Dec., 1894-Jan., 1896 

Hand, Mabelle .June, 1895-Nov., 1898 

Prentiss, Mabel Oct, 1895-April 1898 

Bennett, Mamie May, 1896 

Blanchard, Mae D July, 1896 

Clarke, Christine Aug., 1896 

Young, Jessie M Sept, 1896-July 1899 

Keach, May Mar., 1897 

Bberhart, Rose May, 1897 

Benz, Bessie April, 1898 

Saxton, Gertrude April, 1898-^ept, 1899 

Jacobus, Mira April, 1898 

Mason, Dora L. May, 1898 

Nisbet, Prances May, 1898 

Long, Anna M June, 1898 

Kane, Bertha June, 1898 

Smith, Bell April, 1899 

Morgan, BUa.. April, 1899 

Whedon, Maud April, 1899 

Pagge, Bthelwyn April, 1899 

Dancaster, Josephine Sept, 1899 

Hindle, Clara Sept., 1899 

Ellis, Victoria Sept, 1899 



22 LQS ANGEI.SS PUBI«IC I^IBRARY 



flBflBERS OP TRAINING CLASSES. 

PiRST. May, 1892: Bertha Pierce, Harriet Mercer, Cordelia 
Kingsley. 

Second. August 1892; Nora A. Miller, Florence Thorn burg, 
Anna D. Austin. 

Third. December 1892: Emma J. Whittier, Anna Beckley, 
Daisy Pox. 

Fourth. January 1893: Helen A. Nevin, Gertrude Darlow, 
Bl anche A. Putman, Mabel Dunn, Mary Johnson, Edith Moore. 

Fifth. March 1894: Pearl Gleason, Anna Karl, Georgia 
Horgan. 

Sixth. March 1895. Mabelle Hand, Amanda Mathews, 
Mabel Prentiss, Mary F. English, Ella P. True. 

Seventh. April 1896: Mamie Bennett, Christine Clarke, 
Mae D. Blanchard, Jessie M. Young, May Keach. 

Eighth. May 1897: Rose Eberhart, Gertrude Saxton^ Bessie 
Benz. 

Ninth. December 1897: Mira Jacobus, Jane B. Creighton, 
Dora L. Mason, Fanny F. Nisbet, Anna M. Long, Bertha Kane. 

Tenth. June 1898: Belle Smith, Ella Morgan, Alice M. 
Hays, Maud Whedon, Ethelwyn Fagge, Stella Plynn. 

El*EVENTH. March 1899: Josephine Dancaster, Clara L. 
Hindle, Victoria Ellis, Henrietta Hesselberger, Ida G. Munson, 
Jessie Hasse, M. P. Melzer. 

TwEi«FTH. September 1899: Jane L. Shepafd, Stella Beck- 
ley, Elva S. Smith, Anna Madison, Ruth G. Bettersworth, Emilie 
Jackson, Emma V. Shearer, Lily A. Brown, Corinne King, 
Marguerite D. Bloomer. 



APPBNDIX m. 



23 



CLASSIFIED STATISTICS OF CIRCULATION 



General Works 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Sociology 

Philology 

Natural Science 

Useful Arts 

Fine Arts 

Literature 

History 

Travels 

Biography... 

French 

German 

Italian 

Music 

Juvenile Fiction.... 

Fiction 

Bound Magazines.. 
Unbound " 
Documents 

Unclassed Juvenile 

Unclassed l 
Reference ) 

Total 

Total Loss 



1897-98 


1898^99 


58S 


2068 


6583 


6036 


7227 


7127 


9202 


9524 


1686 


3402 


11090 


11444 


6827 


6866 


6293 


7203 


25794 


25754 


14324 


14767 


14717 


14120 


9720 


9151 


4396 


3828 


2450 


2324 


. 356 


822 


2040 


2482 


4258 


3985 


67676 


42058 


232470 


195610 


19349 


18859 


83261 


84406 




186 




16423 


33577 


38140 


563874 


526585 



GAIN 



1485 



322 

1716 

354 

39 

910 

343 



i<oss 



447 
100 



40 



466 
442 



1145 

186 

16423 

4563 



597 
569 
568 
126 



268 
25618 
36860 

490 




PBR CSNT. OF 
CCRCULATION 



.39 
1.14 
1.35 
1.80 

.64 
2.14 
1.33 
1.86 
4.89 
2.80 
2.69 
1.72 

.72 . 

.44 

.15 

.47 

.74 

8.10 

37.14 

3.58 

16.02 

.04 
3.11 
7.24 



24 



IX>S ANGBI«KS FUBI^IC LIBRARY 



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List of Periodicals. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS. 



MONTHLIES. 

American Electrician; American Journal of Medical Science; 
American Journal of Science; American Monthly; American Natur- 
aliBt; Arena; Art Amateur; Art Journal; Atlantic; Babyhood; Bank- 
er's Magazine; Bimetalist; Blackwood; Book Buyer; Bookman; 
Brochure Series; Business; Catholic World; Century; Chamber's 
Journal; Charities Review; Chautauquan; Child Garden; Christian 
Science Journal; City Goyemment; Commons; Contemporary 
Review; Cosmopolitan; Critic; Current Literature; Delineator; 
Demorest; Eclectic; Education; Educational Review; Electrical 
Engineering; Engineering Magazine; Etude; Fancier's Monthly; 
Figaro Illustre; Fortnightly Review; Forum; Geographical 
Journal; Geological Magazine; Good Health; Good Housekeeping; 
Harper; Harper's Round Table; Inland Printer; Illustrated 
American; International Studio; Irrigation Age; Journal American 
Chemical Society; Journal of Botany; Journal Franklin Institute; 
Elindergarten; Knowledge; Ladies' Home Journal; Library 
Journal: Lippincott: Little Men and Women; McClure; Mission- 
ary Review; Money; Music; National Review; National Single 
Taxer; Nautilus; New England; Nineteenth Century; North 
American Review; Open Court; Outing; Overland; Pall Mall; 
Photographic Times; Popular Science Monthly; Progress; Public 
Libraries; Review of Reviews; Sanitarian; St Nicholas; Scientific 
American Builder; Scribner; Short Stories; Sugar Beet; Teachers' 
Institute; Theosophical Review; Traveller; Truth; Universal 
Brotherhood; Westminster Review. 



UST OP PB&IODICAI3 27 



WEEKLIES. 

Academy ; American Architect and Building News ; 
American Bee Journal; American Gardening; Army and 
Navy Journal; Argonaut; Athenseum; California Ftuit 
Grower; Dramatic Mirror; Electrical World; Engin- 
eering and Mining Journal; Engineering News; Farm, 
Field and Fireside; Fliegende Blfttter; Harper's Bazar; Harper's 
Weekly; Independent; Journal of Education; Judge; I/eslie's 
Weekly; Life; Literary Digest; Literature; Littell's Living Age; 
London Graphic; London Illustrated News; London Times; 
Mining and Scientific Press; Musical Courier; Nation; 
Nature; Notes and Queries; Outlook; Pacific Rural Press; 
Public Opinion; Publishers' Weekly; Puck; Punch; Queen; 
Railroad Gazette; Sanitary Record; Saturday Review; Science; 
Scientific American; Scientific American Supplement; Spectator; 
Springfield Republican; Toronto Globe; Tiber Land und Meer; 
Youth's Companion. 

BI-WEEKLIES. 

Dial; Gardening; Literary World; Revue des deux Mondes; 

BI-nONTHLIES. 

Annals of American Academy of Political and Social Science; 
American Antiquarian; American Economic Studies; American 
Law Review; Bulletin Cooper Ornithological Club. 

QUARTERLIES. 

American Anthropologist; American Historical Review; 
American Journal of Archaeology; Auk; Bulletins of American 
Geographical Society; Current History; International Journal of 
Ethics; Johns Hopkins Studies; Journal of American, Folk Lore 
Mind; Monist; Municipal Affairs; Palestine Exploration Fund 
Pedagogical Seminary; Poet Lore; Political Science Quarterly 
Proceedings of Academy of Natural Science; Publications of 
American Economic Association; Publications of American Sta- 
tistical Association; Quarterly Review; University Chronicle. 

SEHI-ANNUAL. 

Braithwaite's Retrospect. 



36 LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



DAILIB5. 

Atlantic Constitution; Boston Transcript; Chicago Tribune; 
Cincinnati Post; Denrer Republican; Los Angelies Her* 
aid; Los Angeles Times; MinneapoliB Times; New 
Orleans Picajrune; New York Journal; New York Tribune; Omaha 
Bee; Philadelphia Times; Portland Oregonian; Salt Lake Tribune; 
San Frandsoo Call; San Francisco Chronicle; San Pranciico 
Examiner; St. Louis Republic. 



DONATIONS. 

DAILIB5. 

Alaskan; Congressional Record; Denver Post; Los Angeles 
Express; Los Angeles Herald; Ix>s Angeles Record; Los Angeles 
Times; Oakland Enquirer; Oakland Tribune; Riverside Enter- 
prise; Sacramento Bee; Sacramento Record Union; San Di^go 
Tribune; San Diego Vidette; Skagway News; Tacoma Ledger; 
Tombstone Prospector. 

nONTHLIES. 

Book Reviews; Brooklyn Medical Journal; Bureau of Ameri- 
can Republics; California Cultivator; Consular Reports; Ebell; 
Elliott's Magazine; Engineer's Review; Fraternity; Hotel Gazette 
and Outing News; Human Nature; Land of Sunshine; Law Notes; 
Liberty Review; Literary News; Los Angeles Business Review; 
Musical Critic; Natural Science; New Philosophy; Pacific Unit- 
arian; Paradise of the Pacific; Poultry Tribune; Printer and Book- 
maker; Resources of California; Rural Californian; St. Vincent's 
College Student; School Physiology Journal; Shorthand Educator; 
Sound Currency; Sound Money; Southern California Practitioner; 
Tennessee University Magazine; Traveller's Record; University of 
California Magazine; Vegetarian; Whittier Boys and Girls; 
Woman's Home Companion; Western Monthly. 

WEEKLIES. 

Acton Rooster; Alto Angeleno; Alhambra Advocate; American 
Art Journal; American Sentinel; Anaheim Gazette; Boyle Heights 
Press; California ' Independent; California Volksfreund; Capital; 



I 



LIST OP PBRIODICAI.S 29 



Christiaii Advocate; Christian Science Sentinel: Citrograph; Claaa 
Stmggle; Colton Chronicle; Colton News; Commercial Bulletin; 
Conservative; Downey Champion; East Side News; Hlsinore Press; 
Bscondido Times; Evangelic Sunday; Flaming Sword; Freemason; 
Germania; Guide; Healer; Insurance Review; Insurance Sun; 
Journal of Knights of Labor; Ladies of the Kaccabees; La Gaceta; 
Las Dos Republicas; Le Francis; Liberator; Long Beach Tribune; 
Los Angeles Sunday World; L' Union Nouvelle; Merchants' 
Ass'n Bulletin; Ontario Record; Patent Office Gazette; Pomona 
Beacon; Pomona Review; Pomona Progress; Phoenix; Press 
and Horticulturist; Redlands Facts; Redondo Breeze; Rural 
Homes of California; Santa Barbara; Santa Monica Outlook; 
San Luis Obispo Breeze; San Pedro News; Sequoia; Signs of the 
Times; Silver Knight Watchman; Sud California Post; Tehachapi 
Times; Tidings; Titus Weekly Herald; Tulare Weekly Register; 
Union Signal; Vestkusten; Voice; Washington News Letter; 
Western Graphic; Wheeling. 

BI-WBBKLIES. 

Anti-Imperialist; Intelligence; Mining and Metallurgical 
Journal; Railroad Record. 

QUARTBRLIB5. 

American Jewess; Tennessee University Record. 

DONORS TO THE LIBRARY. 

Atkins. Francis H.; Atkinson, Edward; Baker, Virginia 
Barnes, William A.; Barrows, H. D.; Bassett 
Eugene; Bransby, Carlos; Bullard, Frank D.; Burbank, W. F. 
Campbell, Mrs. Charles; Chadwick, John W.; Chase Walter G. 
Clayton, Henry D.; Collins, H. O.; De La Vergnc, George H. 
Dennen, Grace Atherton; Depew, Chauncey M.; Dexter, Mary 
Foote, Allen R.; Hackett, Chauncey; Harrison, Carter H.; Home 
Samuel B.; Hunt, Charles W.; Keeler, Chas. E.; Kerr, Chas. H. 
King, Horatio C. ; Kinney, Abbott; Kraemer, A.; Lamb, Iner 
Libby, C. H.; Lockwood, E. S.; Ludwid Salvator, Arch-duke of 
Austria; Luehman, I. G.; Lytle, John J.; McClellan, Mary E. 
Masser, W. H.; Melville, Geo. W.; Millar, Frederick; Nevin, Rev 
J. C; Pirtle, Mrs. J. A.; Putnam, Irving; Reinstein, J. B.; Rindge 



30 1X>S ANGBLBS PUBZ,IC LIBRARY 



P. H.; R088, David; Rttssell, John A.; Schirmer, G.; Sharpe, W. 
C; Swift, Morrison, I.; Taylor, C. P.; Wade, B. M., and M. 
h.; White, Stephen M.; Wright, M.J. 

Reports and bulletins have been received from the following 
libraries: 

Aberdeen, Scotland; Aguilar, New York; Bangor, Me.; 
Battersea, I/>ndon; Birmingham, Kngland; Bootle, England; 
Bowdoin College; Bridgeport; Bristol, England; Brookline; 
Brooklyn; Brooklyn Public; Bufialo; Cambridge; Cardiff, 
Wales; Carnegie, Pittsburg; Chicago; Cincinnati; Clerkenwell, 
London; Cleveland; Concord; Council Bluffs; Croydon, Eng- 
land; Dayton; Detroit; Dundee, Scotland; Ban Claire; Enoch 
Pratt; Evanston; Porbes; Priends* Association; Priends* Pree; 
Glasgow, Scotland; Grand Rapids; Hammersmith, London: 
Hartford; Heginbottom; England; Hoboken; niion; Iowa Masonic; 
Jersey City; John Crerar; Liverpool, England; Lynn; Manchester, 
England; Milwaukee; Montana Law; Newark; New Bedford; 
New Britain Institute; Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England; New 
Haven; New South Wales; Newton; New York Pree Circulat- 
ing; New York Mercantile; New York Public; Norwich, England; 
Oakland; Omaha; Osterhout; Paterson; Peoria; Peterborough, 
England; Philadelphia Pree Public; Philadelphia Library Com- 
pany; Philadelphia Mercantile; Portland; Pratt Institute; Provi- 
dence; Rochdale, England; St. George, England; St Giles, Eng- 
land; St. Louis Mercantile; St Louis Public School; St Martin- 
in-the-Pields, London; St Paul; Salem; Salt Lake City; San 
Prancisco Mechanics' ; San Prancisco Mercantile; San Ptancisoo 
Public; Scranton; Seattle; South Australia; Springfield, Mass.; 
Springfield, Ohio; Stockton; Syracuse; Toronto; Tufts; Tyne- 
mouth, England; Warren County; Whitehall, London; Wolver- 
hampton, England; Worcester. 

Reports and catalogs have been received from the following 
colleges and schools: 

Amherst; Armour Institute; Atlanta University; Belmont; 
Bennett; Berea; Bowdoin; Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute; Bryn 
Mawr; Chicago College of Law; Columbia University; Columbian 
University; Dartmouth; Hamilton; Harvard University; Indiana 
University ; Johns Hopkins University; Knox; Leland Stanford, Jr. 
University; Milwaukee; Mt Holyoke; Nashville; Newark; 
New Britain Institute; New Haven; New York; Pasadena 
Classical School; Providence; St. Louis; Santa Clara; Universities 



DONORS TO THB UBRART 5I 



of Arizona, California, Chicago, Colorado; Idaho, Maryland, 
Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Oregon; 
Pennsylvania, Southern California, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, 
Virginia, Wisconsin; Wellesley; We8le3ran University; Wilming- 
ton Institute; Yale University. 

Reports have been received from other institutions as follows: 
Alabama Federation of Women's Clubs; American Irish His- 
torical Society; California Academy of Science; California, Depart- 
ment of Highways; California, State Mining Bureau; Christian 
Science Publishing Society; Civil Service Reform Association; 
Field Columbian Museum; First Church of Christ, Los Angeles; 
Honolulu, Department Foreign Affairs; Indian Rights Association; 
Kansas State Historical Society; Labor Protection Asso- 
ciation; Liberty and Property Defense League, Westmins- 
ter; Libby Glass Company; Los Angeles Health Department; 
Los Angeles Board of Trade; National Herbarium, Australia; Man- 
kato Park Commission; Manufacturers' Reg^istration Company 
England; Minneapolis Historical Society; Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art; Minneapolis Park Commission; Missouri 
Botanical Garden; New Jersey Bureau of Statistics; New 
York Bureau of Labor; New York Farmers; Red Cross Society; 
San Francisco Board of Supervisors; San Francisco Settlements 
Association; School of Housekeeping; Second Church of Christ, Los 
Angeles; Smithsonian Institution; Social Reform Union; Southern 
California Historical Society; Southwest Guide Company; Texas, 
Secretary of State; Trans-Mississippi Ezpositiom; United States 
Civil Service; United States Departments of Agriculture, Interior, 
Labor, State, Treasury, War, United States Interstate Commerce 
Commission; United States Superintendent of Documents; Volta 
Bureau, Washington, D. C; Voting Machine Company; Wisconsin 
Free Library Commission; Wisconsin State Historical Society; 
Young Men's Christian Association. 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN 

TO 

The Board of Education 

1899. 



To J» A, Fosbay, Superintendent Public Schools, City, 

Snt: I herewith present the eighth annaal report of the 
condition of the Public School Library, which was in 1891 placed 
in the custody of the Los Angeles Public Library. 

The following is a statement of the receipts and disbursements 
of the Los Angeles City School District Library Fund for the year 
ending June 30, 1899. 

RSCBIPTS. 

July 1, 1898, Balance in ftmd. $1246.43 

September, 1898, Rebate on books by C. C. Parker 2.75 
January 5, 1899, Apportionment from county fund 1250.00 

$2499.18 

DISBURSSMBNTS. 

August, 1898, C. C. Parker books $ 104.88 

« «* " ** . " " 176.86 

Nov., 1898, A. A. Post, books 213.00 

Jan., 1899, Putnam, blue prints... ' 5.00 

** ** Baker & Taylor, books 433-42 

Feb., 1899, C. C. Parker, books and periodicals 412.62 

$1345.78 
Aug., 1898, Western Journal of Education 1.50 

Nov., 1898, Baumgardt Co., books 360.00 

June 30, 1899, balance in fund 79i>9o 

$2499.18 



RBPORT OF LIBRARIAN TO BOARD OP EDUCATION 33 



Of the funds thus expended, $1345.78 went for books and 
periodicals deposited in the Los Angeles Public Library, in accord- 
ance with the original compact between the Boards controlling 
these two educational institutions^-the schools and the library. 

There were purchased 1177 volumes distributed among the 
classes as follows: 

Philosophy 21 

Religion 7 

Sociology 122 

Philology 48 

Natural Science 209 

Useful arts 11 

Pine arts 8 

Literature 237 

History 175 

Travel 74 

Biography 47 

General works 6 

Fiction 132 

Juvenile fiction 79 

French i 

1177 

The circulation to the school rooms by the teachers is shown by 
the table given below: 

July, 1898 104 

August 90 

September 789 

October 2436 

November ^ 3181 

December 2460 

January, 1899 2259 

February 2143 

March 2721 

April 2126 

May 1905 

June 1263 

21474 



34 I<OS ANGBI3S PUBI«IC Z,ZBRARY 






A review of the past eight years shows the most gratifying 
results from the co-operation existing between the school and 
library boards. There has been a continual increase in the number 
of teachers using the library for supplementary work, and con- 
stantly more strenuous efforts on the part of both Boards to meet 
the growing demands for funds on the one hand and books for 
each grade on the other. The following table puts the two 
extremes in comparison: 

LIBRART AVD SCHOOLS 1891-93 I^Qf^ 

Number school houses 35 55 

" " . rooms. 243 409 

** pupils 9914 30314 

teachers employed 243 484 

teachers drawing books « 137 434 

books circulated 11650 21474 

School books in library 1021 5456 

Amount expended for books $498.50 $1345*78 

So far as a careful examination of the records in both offices 
discovers, the first step toward this affiliation was taken by the 
Library Board in May, 1889, when the teachers were put upon the 
*'free list" — ^the library at that time charging an annual fee of four 
dollars per year— after several informal conferences about the 
matter. 

On December 4, 1889, the Board of Directors voted that the 
librarian, Miss T. L. Kelso, be appointed a committee of one to 
confer with the Superintendent of Public Schools regarding a plan 
for circulating the books in the schools. This was followed by the 
Board of Education voting on December 16, 1889, "that the school 
library be transferred to the City Public Library, and a committee 
be appointed to confer with the Library Directors." This com- 
mittee gave partial reports from time to time, and in June, 1890, 
the Library Board voted "that the pupils of the grammar and high 
schools of the city that obtained a promotion average of ninety 
per cent, or more be allowed during the months of July and 
Augpist to draw one book free of charge upon cards issued by the 
librarian." 

In May, 1891, the Board of Library Directors sent to the Board 
of Education a definite plan for the reception and proper care of 
the City School District Library books, should they be deposited 
with the Public Library. The following is the text of the 
communication : 



APPSNDiz vn. 35 



May 30, 1891. 

To the Honorable Board of Education of the City of Los Angeles. 

Gbntusmbn: We have carefully examined the catalogue of 
books in the school libraries, and have conferred with your Library 
Committee and Superintendent of Schools, and we now beg leave 
to make the following suggestions: 

First: After deducting from your books such as would be 
available for reference in the schools and should be kept in the 
schools for that purpose, there would remain about 4,000 volumes 
suitable in the main for circulation. These added to the Public 
Library would place at the disposition of the teachers and pupils a 
library of some 24,000 volumes. 

Second: The books should be turned over to us marked so as 
to be identified, we to have the privilege of placing tliereon in 
addition our library labels and marks. Thus they would be sus- 
ceptible of easy identification at any time and would be still in 
such shape that we can handle them. 

Third. We to be responsible for the books, reasonable wear 
and tear excepted. 

Fourth: Each teacher to make a monthly requisition for say 
not exceeding I3 books for use in her school. The requisition to 
be made through the Superintendent of Janitors of the Public 
Schools, who will receive and return books. The teachers to be 
responsible for the books. 

Fifth: Each pupil desiring to use books to become a regular 
registered member of the Public Library and receive a card as 
such. And when the teacher distributes books to such pupil to 
take and'keep the card as long as the pupil is supplied with books 
through the teacher. 

Sixth: When a teacher 'draws books other than those classed 
as ^'Juvenile,'* such books shall be subject to be called in by the 
Librarian after seven days if required for general circulation. 

Inasmuch as we are preparing to do away with dues and make 
the Library absolutely free on the ist of July next, it is important 
that these books should be delivered to us as soon as possible (if 
the arrangement be made) in order that we may properly label, 
catalogue and place them on the shelves for circulation before 
that time. 

We annex a list of books most in demand by Juvenile readers, 
which we would suggest you would advantageously purchase with 
your funds now on hand. If you desire the purchase can be made 



36 IX>S ANGSLSS PUBLIC I^IBRARY 



through US, which would probably save time and money, inasmuch 
as our large purchases enable us to secure full trade discount. 

Respectfully, 

G. A. DOBINSON, President. 

This proposition from the I^ibrary Board resulted in the fol- 
lowing recommendation by the Board of Education on June 15th, 
1891: 

*'The library committee of the Board recommend that the 
proposed agreement between the School Board and the Library 
Board in reference to the circulation of the school library be 
adopted; also that the funds now in the hands of the Board be 
expended by its library committee to the best advantage.*' 

This ruling was carried into effect as quickly as possible and 
the minutes of the Iribrary Board for July 3, 1891, contain the fol- 
lowing entry. 

''There were delivered to the Library during the month of June 
by the Superintendent of Public Schools, 1021 volumes of the 
Public School Library. Of these volumes 37 were imperfect and 
66 must be rebound before they can circulate. The entire High 
School Library of 1000 volumes was reserved." . 

In October, 1891, after a short trial of the methods adopted in 
June, the Board of Library Directors recommended changes in the 
regulations for the circulation of books in schools as follows: 

''First: Each teacher may draw not to exceed 20 books at one 
time, a requisition being made upon the library as per blank here- 
with. The books may be retained for four weeks. 

Second: The schools of the city be divided into four districts, 
one district exchanging books on each Wednesday of the month. 

Third: The teacher is required to send to the librarian the 
names of the pupils drawing books at the schools, in order that 
they may not draw books at the library at the same time. 

Fourth: Any book damaged or lost while in circulation under 
these rules to be replaced by the Board of Education. 

Fifth, The Board of Directors of the Library to furnish a find- 
ing list to each school, a copy of the juvenile list to each teacher; 
the entire resources of the library to be at the disposal of the 
schools.'* 

In January, 1893, the Library Committee of the Board of Edu- 
cation recommended the adoption of the above rulings, and they 



APPENDIX VII. 37 



have since governed the circnlation of books from the library to 
the school rooms under the guidance of the teachers. 

Only one communication of importance was sent from the 
Board of Library Directors later than this. In July, 1893, the 
attention of the Board of Education was called to the agreement 
two years before that made the library '*the recipient and custodian 
of books to the value of the money annually apportioned to the 
school library," and the fact was mentioned that only one appor- 
tionment had been made. The matter was immediately adjusted 
and since July, 1893, a sum has been set aside annually for this use. 

In accordance with this joint ruling of the two Boards, the 
library submits extended lists of books chosen from the catalogue, 
of such books as may be bought from the school library fund. An 
authority to purchase is given the librarian by the library 
committee of the Board of Education and the books are purchased. 
In this manner the Board of Education in its expenditures has the 
advantage of the large discounts given to the library in its regular 
business. 

The last and most important work undertaken by these boards 
was begun last spring when the Board of Education asked the co- 
operation of the Library Board in establishing and maintaining a 
Reading Room in an unused school building on Macy street. 

The plan was agreed upon almost immediately — that the Board 
of Education was to furnish the building and its equipments, and 
the Library Board the books and the service. 

The rooms were opened June 15, 1899, with about three hundred 
(300) volumes on the shelves, together with a large number of 
popular periodicals. 

It is too early to speak of the results of this work, although^ 
the wisdom of the effort is fully proven. The attendance has 
increased from the beginning, and the number of books used gains 
each month. The residents of that section have already urged 
that the reading room should become a regular branch library, and 
it is without doubt true that this forward step should be taken 
within a year. 

In the school world of Los Angeles, the event of the year was 
the N. E. A. Convention. In connection with the exhibit of 
school appurtenances in the Spring Street Building held during 
the sessions of theN. E. A., the Library set forth its work with the 
schools in a carefully selected collection of books and pictures. 
These were arranged by grades and represented the books and 
pictures generally chosen by teachers for supplementary work with 



$8 I^S ANGBX.BS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



pupils. Lists were prepared covering a wider range than it was 
possible to exhibit and were freely distributed among the visitors, 
with the blanks and forms used to carry on the work. A map of 
the city, including the recently annexed districts, was prepared 
through the courtesy of the City Engineer. This was colored to 
represent the four library districts, with the location of each school 
house indicated, and is preserved in the school department of the 
library. Considerable interest in the work was manifested among 
the visitors, and manj* availed themselves of the opportunity of 
further studying the work by visits to the library. 

The library as an educational factor was further emphasized in 
the programme of the N. E. A. The report of the Committee on 
the relations of Public Libraries to Public Schools, presented to the 
Council, was distributed among the teachers present and a morning 
was devoted to a discussion of the papers therein presented. 

The two sessions of the Library Section, held through the 
courtesy of the City Council, in the Council Chamber, were well 
attended and much interest manifested. 

The additions of the past two years have differed much in 
character. In 1897 the School Reference Room was established 
and copies of many valuable books of reference were purchased 
with that year's appropriation and in consequence the number of 
volumes added was less than usual. During the year just ended 
there were made large accessions to the regular shelves of the 
school library, but the demand of today is by no means supplied. 
This lack of books is especially felt by teachers in the intermediate 
and lower grades. 

For this coming year I strongly advocate the purchase of 
many copies of such books as have been found helpful, and there- 
fore, constantly requested by the teachers. 

I recommend this duplicating of books, not only of those 
works wiiich have a direct bearing on the regular course of study, 
but numbers of certain healthful juvenile books which have been 
asked for by some of the progressive teachers wishing to test new 
padagogical theories. 

I am pleased to thank you for your aid and support in this as 
in previous years. Respectfully submitted, 

Harriet Child Wadlsigh, 

Librarian. 



'fe^<i3 ^J.l 



I' 

I 



^> 



Los Angeles Public Library 



Annual REPOi^r 



of the 



Board of Directors 



and 



Librarian 



1899-1900 



Ki 



la. '\ _ A 



Twelfth Annual Report 



OF TUB 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OFTHB 



Los Angeles Public Library 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN 



DECEMBER, 1900. 



LOS ANOELMS, CAL. 
MCBKIDE PRKSS, 919 W. SmCOMD ST. 

1901 



Los Angeles Public Library. 



M. J. NswMAKK. Vice-PtnidenL 
W. B. Mathews, Secretary, 

H. W. O'MBIfVBNY. 

P. J. Thomas. 



COMMITTEES. 

AUendants: W. B. Mathbws, P. J. Thomas. 
Auditing and Accounts : M.J. Nswmark, P. J. Thomas. 
Books and Donations : H. W. O'Mbi^vbmy, W. B. Mathhws. 
Jointing and Sullies: P. J. Thomas, M. J. NBWMAmK. 
jRules and Admtnisttation : P. J. Thomas, W. B. MaThbws. 

The President is a member of all committees. 



Ma&y L. Jonbs, Librarian and Clerk of ike Board. 

Cbua GitBASON, Assistant Librarian, 



PRINCIPALS OF DEPARTMENTS. 
Nora A. Mii«i«br, Registration. 

Pl«0&BNCB ThORNBURO, Sckool. 

Hblbn a. Nbvin, Cataloguing. 
Gbrtrudb B. Dari^ow, Classification. 
Blanchb a. Putnam, Juvenile. 
Anna McC. Bbcsxby, Reference. 
Mabbi* S. Dunn, Fiction. 
Mary A. Johnson, Accession. 
Mamib Bbnnett, Mail. 



GENERAL ATTENDANTS. 

Pbarl E. Guuson Prancis p. Nisbbt (Xara Hindu 
Christinb Ci,ark Bbrtha B. Kanb Victoria Bi^us 

MAB D. Bl^ANCHARD GBORGIA M. HORGAN Ida G. MUNSOK 

May B. Kbach Bbi«i« Smith Margarbt Mbi<zbr 

RosB Bbbrhart Bi«i#a S. Morgan Stbli^a C. Bbckusy 

Sarah M. Jacobus Bthbi^wyn H. Paggb Janb h. Shbpard 

Dora L. Mason Josbphinb Dancastbr 



Dbnnis Johnson, Janitor. 

Hannah Cronin, Cleaner. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

OFTHC 

Los Angeles Public Library 



DBCBMBBR, 1900. 



To the Council of the City of Los Angeles : 

GBNnBMBN : The Board of Directors of the Los Angeles 
Public Library have the honor to present herewith their report for 
the year ending November 30th, 1900. 

The operations of the library daring the last twelve months 
have been remarkable for their smoothness and progres s ive effi- 
ciency. The working force has been free from all dissensions and 
disturbing conditions, and a spirit of zealous co-operation has pre- 
vailed in every branch of the service. 

QOfSri^ ^® append herewith and make a part hereof the Annual Re- 

port of the librarian, showing in detail, the work, growth, and 
condition of the library. It is full of interesting statistics, and 
certain comparisons therein made, or suggested, are worthy of par- 
ticular notice. 

Balance of cash on hand — 

December 1st, 1900 $7,896 96 

December 1st, 1899 6,345 27 

Expended for books, periodicals and binding, exclusive of 
school money — 

1899-1900: J10,326 41 

1898-1899 6,924 42 

1897-1898 6,609 36 

1896-1897 7,862 87 

1896-1896 7,196 05 



6 LOS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The amonnt expended for books, periodicals, and binding, last 
year exceeded by about $2000.00 that in any previous year since 
the organization of the library under the present city charter in 
1889, with the exception of the first year, when the original stock 
of books was purchased. The Board has been enabled to accom- 
plish this result by strict economy in all expenditures of library 
funds. 

A comparison with certain other libraries of prominence, in 
respect to the percentage of expenditure devoted to books, period- 
icals and binding for the past year is very interesting. 

LOS ANGELES 89 per cent. 

San Francisco 27 per cent. 

Oakland 30 per cent 

Chicago 11 per cent. 

Milwaukee 18 per cent. 

Providence 8 per cent. 

New Haven 22 per cent. 

Baltimore 30 percent. 

Stock si Bsoks Number of volumes in library — 

December 1st, 1900 60,000 

December 1st, 1899.. 51,334 

December 1st, 1898 49,847 

December 1st, 1897 48,146 

December Ist, 1896 44,564 

December Ist, 1895 41,600 

December Ist, 1894 40,150 

It will be observed that it took the library only two years to 
grow from 50.000 to 60,000 volumes, while it took it four years to 
grow from 40,000 to 50,000 volumes. 
Circalatloa The circulation of books for the year 1899-1900 was 609,688, 

the greatest in the history of the library. The circulation for the 
past five years is as follows : 

1899-1900 609,638 

1898-1899 526,586 

1897-1898 530,297 

1896-1897 520,568 

1895-1896 497,615 



RBPORT OP TH8 BOARD OP DIRBCTORS 



As the binding of the library consumes abont eight per cent. Madlag 
of its revennes, the Board has always felt itself in duty bound to 
^ve special care and attention to expenditures for this purpose. 
It has accordingly caused all such work to be done under contract, 
awarded to the lowest bidder. The Board has entered into two 
yearly contracts of this character. The first expired September 
15th last, and the second is now in force. Prices under both are 
about the same. Under the first contract, the binding of the 
library cost |1,894.10, as against $2,562.49, which the same work 
would have cost at the prices paid by the library at the time the 
present board took office. 

The Board has had occasion, during its term of office, to make ^ff jjj jgy 
many appointments to positions upon the library sta£f, and in all 
cases has eschewed favoritism and made its selections solely on 
the ground of merit. It has, from time to time, corrected inequal- 
ities found to exist in the salary list of the library, and has recently 
adopted a scheme for the gradual increase of the salaries paid to 
regular day attendants who have become permanently identified 
with the service and have proved faithful. 

On May Ist, 1900, Mrs. Harriet C. Wadleigh resigned th^posi* CteaMsff 
tion of librarian after an incumbency of nearly three years. She ^''''^•"' 
was succeeded by Miss Mary L. Jones, second assistant librarian, 
and the latter position was thereupon abolished. 

On September 1st, 1900, the Board established a delivery sta- D^llysry 
tion at No. 1952 Bast First street, Boyle Heights. This step was 
taken in imitation of the example of several Eastern libraries 
and was designed to relieve somewhat the excessive demand upon 
the facilities of the main library. The experiment on Boyle 
Heights has proved very satisfactory and will probably lead to 
the establishment of a system of delivery stations throughout 
the city. 

The Macy Street Reading Room has made a very creditable ^^^^ strMt 
record the past year, and we are assured much benefit has resulted RMolaf 
from this work to the people of the neighborhood for whom it has 
been maintained. 

The library is just about to put on sale a new fiction finding pimnag ugt 
list This work was authorized by the Board in June, 1899, and 
has been prepared by the librarian and her assistants without extra 
help or neglect of regular duties. 

The Board desires to gratefully acknowledge the indebtedness Doaatloas 



8 J/3S ANGBIJSS PUBI.IC UBRARY 



of the lit>rar7 to many friends for ^donations of books, periodicals 
and magazines during the past year. 
OrMUst A new and suitable building continues to be the greatest need 

ij^J^^^ of the library. Its present quarters are crowded to overflowing. 
Every nook and corner is occupied, and, for want of room In the 
library, the garret of the city hall has been stored to the extent of 
its capacity with useful and valuable books and documents num> 
bering many thousand. Additional space for storage purposes 
may be obtained only in the basement of the city hall. As the 
city charter excludes all hope of acquiring a building for the 
library through public appropriation, it can look for relief only 
to private beneficence. In this connection we beg to quote from 
our former report : 

"The need of a suitable public library building in this city is 
nothing more or less than the opportunity of the noble-hearted 
and broad-minded men of large means residing here to devote a 
part of their fortune to the great and lasting benefit of their fel- 
low-citizens.'* 

The Board feels that great credit and praise are due to the 
librarian and her assistants for the high standard of efficiency 
maintained and the splendid record made in the library the past 
year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Pbrd. K. Rux,S, IVesident. 

M. J. NSWMARK, 

W. B. Mathbws, 

H. W. O'Mblvkny, 

P. J. Thomas. 
November 30th, 1900. 



Report of Librarian 

189^1900 



To th€ Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Library : 

GbntlBMHN : I have the honor to submit the twelfth annual 
report of the Los Angeles Public Library, covering the year end- 
ing November 30th» 1900. 

The City Council apportioned to the library fund for the fiscal 
year ending June 30th, 1901, the sum of thirty thousand, one hun- 
dred and thirty-five dollars ((30,135), being a levy of four and 
twenty-five hundredths cents (|.0425) on each one hundred dollars 
on the taxable property in the city. This sum is nearer the max- 
imum rate of five cents on each one hundred dollars than has been 
granted since 1896-96. The full rate, had it been appropriated, 
would have given the library |33,600. 

The condition of the library, together with the work accom- 
plished during the past year, is herewith presented by departments 
and in tabulated statements : 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

CASH RSCBIPTS, 1899-1900. 

Cash on hand from 1898-1899 % 6,346 27 

Received balance of apportionment 1899-1900 10,774 68 

Received special appropriation 1,000 00 

Received on apportionment 1900-1901 14,696 69 

Cash received for fines 1,084 97 

Cash received for deposits, 214 25 

Cash received for dues 13 00 

Postal cards sold 134 67 

Supplies, etc., sold.. 19 17 

Books lost and paid for 78 00 

Books sold 44 60 

Borrowed fund 6,000 00 

139,406 20 



10 I,OS ANGBUS PUBLIC UBRA&Y. 



CASH BZPBNI)ITU&B8» 1899-1900. 

Books 4 7,589 06 

Periodicals 1,244 62 

Binding 1,492 84 

$10,326 41 

I/OBt books returned and money refunded... 22 06 

Sundries expense J$ 412 68 

Freight 137 43 

Bzperting books. 10 00 

660 01 

Stationery, printing and supplies 682 00 

Printing Annual Report 96 62 

778 52 

Furniture and Fixtures — 

Chairs.. 70 00 

Balance on typewriter 30 00 

Pamphlet cases 34 00 

Water filters.. 10 00 

Awnings.. 8 00 

Book truck 25 00 

Catalogue case 8 00 

Four local telephones. 19 00 

Cabinetwork 139 00 

Tin map cases 9 00 

Cabinet work 23 00 

Truck 6 00 

Miscellaneous fixtures 9 66 

Shelving 96 00 

Alterations 9 60 

494 16 

Salaries — 

Regular salaries $13,160 20 

Extra and substitute 562 78 

Sunday and holiday 278 40 

Janitor 600 00 

Cleaner 194 00 

14,796 38 

ToTAi, ExPBNDiTXTiiBS.. f26,976 62 

Borrowed fund transferred... $ 6,000 00 
Annex apportionment with- 
drawn 31 72 

Cash balance 7,396 96 

139,405 n 



RBPORT OP THK UBRARIAN 11 



DBP06IT ACCOUNT. 

Receipts — 

November 30th, 1899, to balance |117 75 

November 30th, 1900, to receipts 589 40 

1707 15 
Ezpenditnres — 

November 30th, 1900, deposits returned 492 90 

November 30th, 1900. by balance 214 25 



|70f4 



5 



SCHOOL LIBRARY FUND. 

CASH RBCBIPTS. 

July 1st, 1899, balance $ 791 90 

December, 1899, apportionment 735 00 

Overdraft. 31 

$1,527 21 

CASH BXPBNDITURKS. 

Periodicals 236 25 

Books 1.290 96 

$1,527 21 

CIRCULATION. 

Home use 392,022 

Library use 217,616 

Total circulation 609,638 

Notices sent 5,862 

A detailed statement of the circulation will be found in Ap- 
pendixes 2, 3 and 5. As compared with last year's report the home 
circulation shows an increase of 33,124, and use in the library an 
increase of 49,929. It should be noted that on June 1st the maga- 
zines in the reading room were made free of access to the public 
and no statistics of their use have been kept for the past five 
months. This item in the library use of books averaged 4,000 a 
month and should be considered in a comparative statement of the 
cicGulation for the past two years. 



12 LOS ANCHXJtS PUBUC Z^IBRARY 



RBQI5TRATI0N. 

Registration for the year (men) 2,700 

Registration for the year (women) 4,374 7,074 

Renewals 228 

Withdrawals 185 

Notices sent ^1,804 

Contagions disease notices sent 1,022 

Lost card checks issued 1,974 

Change of address noted ^,993 

The re-registration of patrons commenced a year ago and has 
continued most satisfactorily. Series 1 and 2 are completed, and 
Series 3 begins with the new library year. 

In December, 1899, the age limit was lowered from twelve to 
ten years, a change which has proved most satisfactory. 

ACCB5SI0N5 AND BINDING. 

Number of volumes November 30th, 1900 60,000 

Number of pamphlets /. 3,363 

Number of maps 407 

Number of mounted pictures 2,836 

Number of volumes added during year 9,836 

Number of volumes discarded 1,103 

Number of volumes lost and paid for 67 

Number of volumes December 1st, 1898 61,334 

Net increase 8,666 

Number of books bound 4,673 

Number of books mended 28,204 

A detailed statement of accessions by classes will be found in 
Appendix 4. In Appendix 6 is noted a comparison of the number 
of volumes accessioned for the six years past, in which it appears 
that the accessions of this year are nearly double that of any pre- 
ceding year. Of the total 9,836 volumes added, 1,290 were bought 
from the school library fund, 413 were gifts, 321 were books in the 
work room but not yet accessioned at the time of the last report, 
150 of which were bought previous to December 1st, 1899. There 
are in the work room unaccessioned November 30th, 240 volumes 
which have been paid for by this year's funds, making a total of 
7,902 volumes purchased from the library fund for the year. 

Fewer books have been discarded than usual, owing to the 
reduced cost of binding. Many volumes have been rebound which 
would have been discarded at the old schedule of binding rates. 



REPORT OP THE LIBRARIAN 18 



Of the accessions of the year, not commented upon elsewhere, 
the most notable are those of foreign literainre and mnsic. These 
are especially appreciated by patrons of the library. 

Books discarded and lost have been reported and replaced 
promptly except in cases where it has been deemed advisable to 
permanently discard the book. 

CLASSIFICATION AND SHELF. 

Number of volumes classified and shelf-listed : 

Classes, circulating 3,396 

Classes, reference 1,487 

Fiction ^3,196 

Juvenile fiction 956 9,036 

Re-classified — 

Classes 298 

Fiction 8,670 8,968 

Total number of volumes classified 18,003 

The change from the old system of fiction numbers to the 
Cutter and Sanborn system has been accomplished during the 
year, book numbers having been assigned to 11,866 volumes. 
Duplicate shelf lists of fiction have been typewritten. A new 
copy of the shelf list for class 100 (Philosophy) has been pre- 
pared. The task of compiling a separate shelf list of the juvenile 
books in the "Classes" has been commenced and will prove very 
useful when completed. In addition many pages of the shelf list 
have been rewritten where necessity demanded. A careful count 
has been made of the books contained in each of the classes in 
the circulating department, a tabulated statement of which appears 
in Appendix 5. 

CATALOQUINO. 

Number of volumes catalogued during the year : 

Classes 300-900 inclusive 1,252 

Class 200. 520 

Fiction (new) 502 

Fiction (recatalogued).. 4,031 4,638 

Classes 000-200 inclusive (bulletin cards) 180 

Total number of books 6,485 

Approximate number of cards typewritten 42,000 



14 LOS ANGBLBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The main achievement of this d^artment, aside from the 
regular routine work, has been the preparation of the new fiction 
catalogues, printed and on cards. Work was begun on November 
8th, 1899, and the printed list wUl be in the hands of readers De- 
cember 3d, 1900. Two complete catalogues on cards have been 
typewritten, one for the use of the public and one for the 8ta£^ 
the latter serving also as copy for the printer. All books are en- 
tered under both title and author, with an additional entry under 
pseudonyms and all forms other than the present name of authors. 
Many books and authors have been annotated, and a title list of 
short stories is appended. The printed list represents 4,410 com- 
plete novels and includes all fiction in the English language except 
juveniles, in the library November Ist, 1900. The card catalogues 
are complete to date. The work of preparing the catalogues repre- 
sents the time and labor of two persons, the principal of the depart- 
ment for two hours a day, and an assistant working five hours a 
day, for thirteen months. The printed catalogue consists of a 
book of 238 pages, printed on maniUa paper, neatly bound in mus- 
lin backed covers, which the library sells at ten cents a copy, or 
half the cost of publication. It is earnestly recommended that 
this finding list may be kept to date by the publication of a 
monthly bulletin which should embody additions not only to the 
fiction department but to the entire library. 

RBPBRBNCe. 

Bound magazines added 926 

Documents, including pamphlets, added 816 

Other volumes added 582 

Maps added 233 

Pictures added 320 

Books consulted 97,877 

Pictures used 6,479 

Readers 39,770 

Bibliographies prepared 73 

The reference department continues to be one of the most 
active in the library, the various schools, societies and clubs de- 
pending upon it more and more in their work. During the past 
year many valuable sets of periodicals have been added and broken 
files completed, among them being Bibliotheca Sacra, Catholic 
World, Lippincott's, Missionary Review, Portfolio, Saturday Re- 



&BPORT OF THB LIBRARIAN 15 



view, Stndio, and duplicate aets of Harper's, Century, and Scrib- 
ner'a Monthly. The original aets oi these last named magazines 
have been placed in circulation. Attention is called to the list of 
periodicals (Appendix 7), in which is noted those of which the 
library contains complete or broken files. 

An application made early in the year, for numbers of bul- 
letins and reports of the different Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tions, met with a cordial and prompt response. While our files 
are not complete, they are now in a very good condition. 

The printed cards indexing the Annual Reports of the Bureau 
of Ethnology, the Smithsonian Institution, and the National 
Museum, with the Bulletins of the New York State Museum, and 
the Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, were added this year, and greatly facilitate research. 

The books added to the reference department have been of 
exceptional value, covering many subjects formerly not in the 
library. The preparation of bibliographies and reading lists is 
continued, and lists previously prepared are kept to date, making 
constantly more available the resources of the library. 

FICTION. 

Number of volumes (total) 11,866 

Number of volumes added this year 3,196 

Number of volumes discarded 609 

Number of volumes lost and paid for 34 

Net gain 2,563 

Books circulated. 200,095 

Reserve postals sold 2,387 

Reserve postals mailed 2,338 

In spite of these accessions the circulation of fiction has fallen 
from 37.14 per cent, to 33.69. It is seldom that a library is called 
upon to explain a decrease in the circulation of fiction, still less to 
excuse it, but from the fact that the percentage ratio between the 
stock in fiction and the circulation of the same is 2.05 (see Appen- 
dix 5) , it is evident that a more special attention to the need of this 
department is demanded. The new fiction finding list will do 
much to bring the circulation to a normal rate. A continuation of 
the present policy of replacing books as they are worn out and 
discarded, with a liberal purchase of new fiction, and further du- 
plication of those in hand, will raise this important department to 
a par with others. 



16 IX)S ANGBIrSS PUBUC I4BRA&Y 



The system of reserving books of fiction, referred to in the 
Isst report, bos been in operation for one year. It has proved most 
satisfactory both to readers and to the library management Sev- 
enty-nine titles have been placed on the regular list, for which 
2,271 postals have been sold. Seventy-one more titles have been 
added to meet a temporary demand, for which 116 postals have 
been sold. 

The number of copies purchased has varied with the demand. 
The length of time that a book has been in the library again affects 
the record. The following report of the reserve copies of the six 
most popular books of the year may be of interest : 

No. Postals Postals 

Title. copies. sold. sent 

Richard Carvel 9 227 226 

David Harum 12 203 203 

When Knighthood was in Flower 6 196 194 

Janice Meredith 6 186 186 

To Have and to Hold 7 160 159 

Red Pottage 5 123 123 

As will be seen, the excessive demand for these books is over, 
and nearly all are in the general circulation. The indirect result 
of the reserve system cannot be reduced to figures. The number 
of duplicates which may not be reserved is quite as large as for- 
merly, hence those patrons who do not care to avail themselves of 
the reserve collection, find fewer to compete with, and the chances 
for securing a new or popular novel are multiplied. 

SCHOOL AND JUVENILE. 

Number of volumes in department: 

Fiction .3,090 

Classes .4,221 

Cixculation^uvenile Department: 

Home 61,420 

Library 20.582 

72,002 

Circulation — School Department: 

Home 62,188 

Library 6,922 

68,110 

140,112 



REPORT OP THB UBRARIAJT 17 



The acoeasions to this department for the year have amonnted 
to nearly 1,500, and yet the demand so for exceeds the supply as to 
make the ratio between the drcnlation and number of yolnmes in 
the library 1.94. With more books come more readers who demand 
more books, and the chain is endless. The school library fond is 
of course devoted to this department, as well as money from the 
regular library fund, and yet the call is for more. The teachers 
have been exceptionally eager this school year in their requests for 
the best children's books, and our shelves are perennially empty. 

During the year the principal of the juvenile department has 
addressed several Mothers' Clubs in the dty on the subject of their 
children's reading. It is hoped by this means that a co-operation 
may be established that will prove of mutual benefit. 

The demand for books on pedagogy has increased very per- 
ceptibly during the year, the additional call coming from both 
teachers and parents. Not only should our list be extended, but 
duplicates of the best works in this important department should 
be multiplied. 

MAIL AND MAOAZINBS. 

Periodicals on file in the reading room: 

By gift 128 

By subscription 431 557 

Acknowledgments written 676 

Magazine covers made 504 

Magazines covered 6,401 

The multitude of details covered by the work in this depart- 
ment is but imperfectly indicated by statistics. A re-arrangement 
of the reading room was effected in June, which has made more 
available the small amount of space devoted to newspapers and 
magazines. The current numbers of periodicals on file were then 
made free of access, a change which has been greatly appreciated 
by our patrons. 

DBUVBRY STATIONS AND BRANCHES. 

The Castelar branch has continued, as formerly, open two 
evenings a week, and a distinct falling off* of patronage is noted. 
After a consultation with the managers of the University Settle- 
ment Association, who kindly furnish it house room,|it is suggested 
that the branch be abandoned, and as a substitute that a delivery 



16 IX>S AHOBLB8 FOBILIC I^SEAmV 



steHoii be MUUkhed in the asme vicinkj, but on « wmvt fre- 
quented stoMt. 

The Mecy street leading xoom hM been wammtmktd with a «reU 
wi it ftii i nd pt^tBonmgt thiotighoiit the yetr. It is eawesidy leooBi- 
laeadsd that a delivery station for the drcnlation of booica be con- 
dnoted in oonnection mth the reading room. 

The Boyle Heights delivery atation waa estaUirfied Soptuabtr 
Ist, 1900, the Boyle Heights drug atore» at 1062 Bmt Pint ataaet, 
coodncting the work gratuitoaaly. Deliveries and coUeetiaaa have 
baen made «nce a day. The station has been ooadnoted as an 
experiment, with the idea that if it was successfal other stations 
sfaonld be started at varions points tiironghont the dity. Caoaider- 
ing the lack of fodUties in the way of -finding lists, theeKpertment 
may be oonaidered a saocesaiiil one, and I would reooatmead that 
oChars be established. I wonld further snggest tliat coUectioas in 
the morning and deliveries in the afternoon, thnee tinea a week, 
wonld better aerve the pnblic than the pceaent arrangemfint, be- 
sides being less expensive to the library. Such a system of ileUv- 
ery stations wonld prove of twofold benefit. Patrons of the library 
living at a distance are able to exchange their books with a sav- 
ing of time and car £eu:e, and the crowded condition of the main 
library will be somewhat relieved. 

The loaning of books to the various fire stations in the city is 
another form of library extension in its trial stage. As the plan 
has been in force less than a month, it is too soon to report defi- 
nitely upon results. As many books as there are men, are sent to 
each station to be kept one month without renewal. But one de- 
livery has been made ; but judging by tht reception the books 
have met with in every instance, the privilege ia greatly appredaited 
by the firemen of the city. 

TRAIf^lNO CLASS. 

The thirteenth training dass commenced its course Ifovember 
6th, the preliminary written examination having occurred October 
16th and the oral October 16th. A revision of the rules affecting 
the training dass has been made duriiig the year and a drcular 
issued setting forth the work as now conducted. The only material 
tthange in the rules of past years was in the one regulating the 
time of the formation of dasses. This was fixed annnslly on the 
first Monday in November. It was estimated that a dass of six 
would supply the library with the needed attendants, and the 



RSPORT OF TBB IrlBRA&IAN 19 



membenhip of each training class was therefore limited to that 
number. The need of a training school for lilnrarians on this coast 
is most evident from the number of applications we have for ad- 
mission to this class. With onr present limited room we can con- 
sider nothing farther than the training of onr own assistants, and 
consequently are forced to refuse admission to all outside. 

ADHINISTRATION. 

The changes in the organization of the staff have been as fol- 
lows: Miss Moore, principal of the mail department, resigned 
November Ist ; Miss Ix>ng, of the day force, resigned June 1st ; 
Miss Whedon, of the night force, February Ist, and Miss Benz, 
June Ist. The vacancies thus created were filled as follows : Miss 
Bennett was appointed principal of the mail department; Miss 
Kaaf and Miss Horgan promoted from the night to the day staffs 
and Miss Munson, Miss Melzer, Miss Stella Beckley and Misa 
Shepard were transferred from the substitute class to the night 
force. Miss Benz, at her own request, was transferred from the 
night staff to the substitute list, where she continues to serve the 
library from time to time. As now organized the library force con- 
sists of librarian, assistant librarian, nine heads of departments, 
ten negnlar day attendants and ten night attendants. The work 
for the year, as summed up under the different departments, has 
increased in every particular, and yet it has been carried through 
by a staff numbering one less than that reported last year. 

I most heartily commend the young women, to whom much 
of the credit of this most successful year belongs. They have 
been faithfal and untiring in the discharge of their duties. 

To the gentlemen of the Board I would express the apprecia- 
tion and thanks of the entire library staff for the cordial co-opera- 
tion and support we have received at your hands. 

Respectfally submitted. 

Mary L. Jonks, Librarian, 



APPENDIXES. 

/. Memoranda and Officers of the Los Angeles 

Public Library^ arranged chronologically. 
IL Classified Statistics of Circulation, 

III, General Home Circulation. 

IV. Statistics of Accessions, 

V. Comparative Statement of Boohs and Circulation. 

VI. Comparative Statement. 

VIL List of Periodicals. 

VIII. Donors to the Library. 



APPSN DIX I 21 



1872 



<< 



MEHORANDA. 

fPopnUtioii of Lo6 Angeles^ 10,000. 

Area of Los Angeles, 17,172.37 acres. 

Assessed value of Los Angeles, $2,231,497.00. 

t Library established by public spirited citizens. 

1872 First Board of Diectors appointed. 

First Librarian appointed. 

Library located in Downey Block. 

Annual fee, |5.00. 

Memorial presented to Legislature, asking that a Public 
Library be established in the City of Los Angeles. 
1878 Special act of Legislature enabling the City of Los Angeles 
to apportion money for maintaining Public Library. 
" Mayor and Council ez-offido Regents of Library. 
1889 New City Charter, Board appointed by Mayor. 

Library removed from Downey Block to the City Hall. 

Volumes when moved, 6,666. 

Annual fee, f4.00. 

Teachers placed on "free list." 

Library reclassified by the Decimal Classification. 

1891 Library made free. 

" Training Class established. 

1892 Board of Education placed school libraries in custody of 

Library Board. 
1897 Library reorganized to "free access." 
First bequest (Dr. Wm. A. Edgar). 
First subscription to new building (J. H. Jones). 
Castelar Reading Room and delivery station opened. 
Stimson Lafayette Industrial School delivery station opened. 
Macy Street Reading Room opened, carried on jointly by 
Board of Education and Library Board. 
1900 Boyle Heights delivery station established. 
" Fireman's libraries started. 
" Number of volumes, 60,000. 
*< Circulation, 609,638. 
'* Appropriation, |30,135. 

(Population of Los Angeles, 102,479. 

Area of Los Angeles, 27,695.49 acres. 

Assessed value, $67,000,000.00. 



i< 

14 



II 
II 
II 
II 
l< 



22 LOS ANGBtBS PUVtIC LIBRARY 



OFFICERS OP THB LOS ANQELBS PUBLIC LIBRARY 
ARRANGED CHRONOLOGICALLY. 



FIRST BOARD OP DIRBCTORS, APPOINTSD DBC, 1872. 

J. G. Dowaey, President, Harris Newmark. 

S. B. Caswell. Y. Sepulveda. 

H. K. W. Bent. W. H. Mace. 

Col. Geo. H. Smith. A. W. Potts. 

Gen. Geo. Stoneman. T. W. Temple. 

W. B. Lawler. R. M. Dalton. 

DIRBCTORS 1889-1899. 

Dobinson, G. A 1889-1895 Bonebrake, Geo. H.... 1896-1897 

Howard, F. H 1889-1895 Flint, F. F 1895-1897 

Hanchette, H. Jay 1889-1891 G'Melveny. H. W 1895-1897 

Jones, E. W 1889-1891 Stewart, Geo. H .1896-1897 

Davies, J. M 1889-1893 Storrs, H. E 1896-1897 

Severance, Mrs. C. M..1891-1893 Dockweiler, Isidore B.1897-1899 

Smith. Col. Geo. H 1891-1893 Burbank, W. F 1897-1899 

Borden, Sheldon 1893-1895 Foster, Ernest K 1897-1899 

Hamilton, W. J 1893-1895 Garland, W. M 1897-1899 

Spaldhig, W. A 1893-1895 Rogers, Earl 1897-1899 

Rule, F. K 1899 

Mathews, W. B 1899 

Newmark, M. J 1899 

O'Melveny, H. W 1899 

Thomas, F. J 1899 

UBRARIANS. 

LitUefield, J. C Dec, 1872-Jan., 1879 

Connolly, P Jan., 1879-Jnne, 1880 

Foy, Mary E .June, 1880-Jan., 1884 

Gavitt, Jessie A .Jan., 1884-Jan., 1889 

Prescott, Lydia A .Jan., 1889-Apr., 1889 

Kelso, Tessa I, Apr., 1889-May, 1896 

Fowler, Clara B May, 1895-June, 1897 

Wadleigh, Harriet Child June, 1897-May, 1900 

Jones, Mary L , May, 1900 



A8S1SVANT UBBARIAMS. 

Gavitt, Jessie A Apr., 186^Peb., 

Marquis, Barton H May, l889-9ept., 18M 

Hasse, Adelaide R ?eb., ISOO-May, 1895 

Penner, ]>na B Apr., lS90^Jvaiet IdOS 

Austin, Anna D Apr., 1805-Sept., 1898 

Gleason, Celia July, 18W 

Jones, Mary L Feb., 1899-May, 1900 



ATTBKDAMTS. 

Haines, Estelle Sept., 1889-May, 1885 

Hasse, Adelaide R Sept., 1889-May, 1895 

Wellman, Bva A Sept., 188^Jane, 1891 

Penner, Lena B Sept., 1889-June, 1893 

Gleason, Celia Dec., 1889 

Longstreet, Mamie P Dec., 1899-April, 1890 

Bnmiller, Emma .Jan., 1890-Mar., 1890 

Russ, Nellie M Peb., 1890-Jan., 1898 

Seville, Blanche -Aug., 1890-Oct., 1893 

Clarke. M. E Aug.. 1890-Nov.. 1890 

Avery, Zora .Nov., 1800-Dec., 1890 

Pargo, Elizabeth Nov.. 189a-Sept., 1899 

Kimball, Helen h Nov.. 1890-Sept., 1893 

Logan, Margaret April, 1891-Oct.. 1898 

Walker, Stella ..May, 1891-Nov., 1894 

Hendricks, Ida May, 1801-Sept.. 1891 

♦Wise, Corinne June, 1891-June, 1898 

Tedford, Martha Sept.. 1891-July, 1896 

Kingsley. Cordelia May, 1892-Aug.. 1896 

Mercer, Harriet May. 1892-April, 1897 

Pierce. Bertha E May, 1892-July. 1896 

Miller. Nora A Aug.. 1892 

Thornburg, Florence Aug., 1892 

Austin, Anna D Aug.. 1892-Sept., 1898 

Darlow, Gertrude E July. 1893 

Nevin, Helen A July, 1893 

Putnam, Blanche A July. 1893 

Beckley, Anna McC Aug., 1893 

Johnson. Mary A Nov., 1893 

Dunn, Mabel S Mar., 1894 



24 XX>S ANOBX«B8 FUBUC UBRARY 



Moore, Bdith A Sept., 1894-Noy., 1900 

Qleaaon, Pearl B Sept., 1894 

Horgan, Georgia M Oct., 1894 

Earl, Anna Dec., 1894-Jan., 1896 

Hand, Mabelle .Jane, 1895-Nov., 1898 

Prentiss, Mabel Oct., 1895-April, 1898 

Bennett, Mamie May, 1896 

Blanchard, Mae D.. .July, 1896 

Clark, Christine Ang., 1896 

Yonng, Jessie M Sept., 1896-Jnly, 1899 

Keach, May B Mar., 1897 

Bberhart, Rose May, 1897 

Benz, Bessie h April, 1898-Jane, 1900 

Sazton, Gertrude April, 1898-Sept., 1899 

Jacobus, Sarah M April, 1898 

Mason, I>oraL May, 1898 

Nisbet, Prances P May, 1898 

Long, Anna M June, 1898-June, 1900 

Kane, Bertha B .June, 1898 

Smith, Bell Jlpril, 1899 

Morgan, BllaS April, 1899 

Whedon, Maud April, 1890-Peb., 1900 

Pagge, Bthelwyn H April, 1899 

Dancaster, Josephine Sept., 1899 

Hindle, Clara Sept., 1899 

Bills, Victoria Sept., 1899 

Mnnaon, Ida G Peb., 1900 

Melzer, Margaret P .June, 1900 

Beckley, Stella July, 1900 

Shepard, Jane I, J^oy., 1900 



APPSNBIX n 



26 



CLASSIFIED STATISTICS OP CIRCULATION. 



000. 

100. 

200. 

300. 

400. 

600........ 

600. 

700 

800. 

900.. 

910. 

92a 

French.. 



Italtaa. 

Spmiih 

Music 

Juvenile Fiction..... 

Fiction 

Bonnd Magazines .. 

Magazines.... 

Docnments 



Undassed Juvenile 

Unclassed 1 
Reference / 



Total 

Net gain 



1898-99 



2068 

6036 

7127 

9624 

3402 

11444 

6866 

7203 

25754 

14767 

14120 

9151 

3828 

2324 

822 

2482 

3985 

42058 

195610 

18859 

84406 

186 

16423 

•38140 



526585 



I........ 



1899-00 



20468 

7749 

12041 

21748 

18198 

23295 

14692 

14612 

37979 

22273 

23079 

12200 

3638 

1846 

596 

2543 

3662 

31286 

205443 

24378 

62477 

2853 

20582 



609638 



OAIK 



18400 

1713 

4914 

12224 

14796 

11851 

7826 

7409 

12225 

7506 

8959 

5049 



61 



9228 
9833 
5519 



2667 
4159 



144339 
83053 



190 
478 
226 



323 



^•SlStt 



38140 



61286 



OF 
CZaCULATION 



3.36 

1.27 

1.97 

3.57 

2.98 

3.83 

2.41 

2.39 

6.23 

8.66 

3.78 

2.83 

.59 

.31 

.09 

.42 

.61 

8.42 

33.69 

3.99 

10.25 

.47 

3.88 



• Reference books were not claaeified in 1M8-18BB. 
*^ No oonnt has been kept of Rcadinc-room magssinca since Jane Isl. 



26 



APntMfDlX tti 



i 
§ 



S S^ SC Ss Sf S 53 s^ s S So* s 






lO 
00 ^ 



«0 



So* r« M ^ 
9 r^ »Q 00 



•» •> •. •» * ^ J «k ^ a> 

^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 00 CO ^ '^ 






z 
o 



o 
c 

u 

z 
tu 
a 






a 



A ^ O fO 00 QD 
09 Q «-i t» IQ CO 
t^ 0» Ok 04 00 Cd 



S S S 



O) lO 

ei'ei'©«'eoc4'©i'csrof©i'c4'w'©f 












s 




es :J! ® 

^ db iH 

CO OO 00 



^ ^ ^ r^ o» CO 

00 00 f-l 04 



fe S S S «n — 

CO OQ ^ 00 00 ^H 
e0ke^<DCDtO00i-Hi-iCICDCD 



s 



OB 



c^S^SoooSo^ 

W » 1-1 of 



t^ iH 't*' 00 !-• CO 
00 CO 00 00 ^ ^ 



9 



J 



S' 



!■ 









g -e 



».' 



h S <! S 



4> 





I § I 
< J5 o 



In 

a 



5 



AtmmTX T7 



27 



5TATI5TIC5 OP ACCESSIONS. 





ACCBUIOnD 


4 


• 

Q 

1 








1 


II 


1 


II 


i 


100 


128 
219 
374 

45 
229 
177 
107 
404 
258 
290 
147 

16 

3196 

956 

195 

186 

71 

77 

292 
181 


4 

47 
55 
18 
49 
17 
53 
162 
30 
29 
48 
29 


182 
266 
429 

63 
278 
194 
160 
566 
288 
319 
195 

45 

3196 

956 

196 

200 

74 

77 

801 

1218 

181 

2 


4 

4 

28 

3 

12 

6 

7 

18 

24 

23 

7 


69 

52 

112 

18 

74 

69 

100 

284 

182 

245 

124 

7 

1229 

495 

52 

21 

32 

24 

25 

1349 

110 


2 


200 




300 


1 


400 


1 


500 


2 ex. 


600 


1 


700 




800 


5 


900 


1 


910 


2 


920 


lex. 


000 




Fiction 


609 

277 

4 

3 

4 


34 


Juvenile 




11 


French 


1 

14 
3 

801 
926 


2 






Spaniali 




Itelian 


1 


IDocnments 




MngazineB 


71 
4 




Muflic 


1 


Maps 


2 














TotaU 


7548 


2288 


9836 


1103 


4673 


67 



28 



▲PPBRinX V 



COnPARATIVe STATEMENT OP BOOKS 
AND CIRCULATION. 



CI^88 


|l 


"J- 


1^ 


Per Cent 


Percentage 
Katlo 


000- 


602 

970 

2427 

2868 

662 

2238 

1291 

1027 

4674 

2937 

2829 

2142 

928 

476 

296 

461 

961 

3090 

11866 

1139 


1.88 
2.2S 
6.66 
6.67 
1.27 
6.13 
2.96 
2.36 

10.48 
6.73 
6.49 
4.91 
2.13 
1.10 
.68 
1.04 
2.18 
7.08 

27.11 
2.61 


168 

4436 

4237 

10703 

3438 

11903 

3907 

3866 

18872 

12696 

11891 

6621 

2967 

1406 

462 

2200 

3166 

49401 

200326 

6766 

369306 


.04 

1.24 

1.17 

2.97 

.96 

3.32 

1.09 

1.08 

6.26 

361 

3.81 

1.84 

.83 

.39 

.14 

.62 

.88 

13.76 

66.75 

1.87 


.028 


100.. 


.656 


200. 


.210 


300 


.462 


400 


.74a 


600.. 


.647 


600. 


.868 


700. 


.467 


800. 


.600 


900. 


.612 


910.. 


.610 


920 


.416 


French 


.889 




.364 


Ttnli^t? 


.206 


Spanish 


6.96 


Music 


4.03 


Javenile Fiction 

Fiction 


1.94& 
2.060 


Bound Magazines... 


.720 


Total 


43663 






••••••••• 











Unbound magasinei are omitted. 

A percentage ratio leH than unity indicates that the snpply of books 
exceeds the demand ; when it is above unity the demand is proportionately 
greater than the supply. These figures consider quantity only. If it were 
possible to reduce quality to statistics the results migat be difTerent. For full 
ex^nationofthe significance of this table see A. I«. A. P rocee di ng, 1900, pp. 



▲PPBNDIX VI 



29 






% 

to 

u 

> 

cm 

8 



^S8 



Hi 



gi^B 



8(»e 



15 



ffl 3^ ^ $ 5 
eo ob f-4 lo S 

S lO ^ 9 9 9 



s 



3 

3 ^ M 



I 

M 



5 



«p CD '^ e^ ko '^ 

m lo lo »o pH r» 

95 io r« 3 -^ o 

«k «» «k f^ ^ ^ 

a» -^ ^ "^ ^ C9 



SoScoS^Stom9So 






s 



I I § ii i 



■^ eo C9 ph o 



O 00 C^ kO CI 






oSSt^oSoSdoSSo 



s 



ill 



8 & 






a«P«PaO$4rHa»Ar»«OrHQO 
SIOi-l(he4iHiHiHfHe4iH 



c» 
















• 


09 

• 


00 

• 




• 


'^ 


• 


X 


eo 


00 


-^ 


•* 


-^ 


-^ 


00 


04 



wvPCwyPygwCPCPCSCpOP 
00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 OO 00 oo 

OB U» 09 QD ua ^B ^B ua ^B fyi ^fl 

SK jK 2k SC ^^ xf ^^ ^^ IS ^Wf ac 
aOOOOOOQOOQOOQOOwOOOO 



30 



AYPWDDC VII 



List of Periodicals. 



• Copies circnlftte. 

I X>oiiatioiw. 

1 File complete. 

t Pile par&aUj complete. 



DAILY. 

{Alaskan 

Atlanta Constitiitimi 

Boaton Transcript , 

Chicago Tribnne , 

Cincinnati Poat 

{Congressional Record 

Denver Post , 

Denver Republican 

t{I/OS Angeles Express 

t{I/OS Angeles Herald ^... 

t{Los Angeles Record , 

t{Los Angeles Times 

Minneapolis Times 

New Orleans Pica3mne 

New York Journal 

New York Tribune 

{Oakland Enquirer..^ 

{Oakland Tribune 

Omaha Bee 

Philadelphia Times 

Portland Oregonian 

{Riverside Enterprise , 

{Sacramento Bee , 

{Sacramento Record Union 

St. Louis Republic , 

Salt Lake Tribune 

{San Diego Morning Call 

{San Diego Tribune 

{San Die;go Union 

San Francisco Call 



8 
S 
8 
8 



APpawiMz vn 



n 



1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



San Francisco Chronicle ^ 

San Prandsco Bzaminer 

2San Luis Obispo Breeze... 

JTacoma Iredger 

{Tombstone Prospector .«..^. 

WBBKLY. 

fAcademy. 

2Acton Rooster 

{Alhambra Advocate 

{American^ The 

fAmerican Architects and Bnilding News. In- 
ternational Edition 

2 American Art Jonmal 

Americal Bee Journal 

American Gardening 

{Anaheim Gazette 

t*Argonaut 

Army and Navy Journal 

Army and Navy Register 

fAthenaeum .' 

{Azusa Leader 

{California Cultivator 

{California Independent 

{CapiUl 

{Catalina Clipper 

{Christian Science Sentinel 

{Citrograph 

{Colton Chronicle 

{Colton News • 

{Commercial Bulletin 

{Conservative 

fDramatic Mirror 

{Dun's Review 

{El Monitor Mezicana' 

{ElProgroso 

tElectrical World 

•Electricify 

tEngineering and Mining Journal 

{Escondido Times 



32 



LOS ANOBIAS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



CopoM. School. 



tBngineeriiig News 

Farm, Field and Fireside 

{Plaining Sword 

fFliefende Blatter 

{Forward Movement Herald 

{Germania 

{Guide 

^Harper's Bazar 

t*Harper'a Weekly... 

flndependent 

tjoomal of Bducation 

'Journal of Bducation 

Judge 

{VUnion Nouvelle. 

{La Gaceta 

{Las Dos Republicaa 

{Le Fran^ais 

t*LeaHe'8 Weekly 

tLife 

tLiterary Digest 

tLiterary World , 

{Literature 

tLittelPs Living Age 

tLondon Graphic 

tLondon Illustrated News 

London Times 

{Los Angeles Democrat 

{Madera Times 

{Marin County Enterprise.... 

{Mining and Metallurgical Journal. 

fMining and Scientific Press 

fMusical Courier 

{Nation 

tNature 

{New Century 

fNotes and Queries. 

{OUBnu 

{Ontario Record 

tOutlook 

'Outlook 

tPacific Rural Press 



8 
2 
1 



2 



2 



AFPBNDIZ Vn 



88 



CopzBt. School. 



{Patent Office Gazette 

{Phoenix. 

{Pomona Progreaa 

{Pomona Review. 

{Press and Horticnltwaliat 

tPnblic Opinion 

*Pablic Opinion 

fPnbliBher't Weekly 

Puck 

tPnnch 

*Qneen 

Railroad Gazette 

{Railroad Record 

{Redondo Breeze 

{San Pedro News 

{Santa Monica Ontlook 

Sanitary Record 

Saturday Evening Post 

{Saturday Post 

tSatnrday Review 

^School Journal 

fSdence 

tScientific American 

*Scientific American 

{Scientific American Supplement. 
^Scientific American Supplement 

{Sentinel of Liberty 

{Sequoia 

tSpectator 

Sphere.. 

Springfield Republican 

{Sud California Post 

{Sutter Independent 

{Templeton Advance 

{Tidings 

Toronto Globe 

{Tulare Weekly Register 

tuber I^md und Meer 

{Union Signal 

{Vestkusten 

{Western Graphic 



2 



1 

2 



34 JJOS ANGBIfBS PUBLIC I^IBRAJLY 



{Western Miner and Financier. 1 

{Wheeling 1 

Youth's Companion 5 

BI-WEEKLY. 

JDial 3 

{Equity 1 

Gardenings 1 

^Intelligence 

t*Revae des Deoz Mondes 1 



nONTHLY. 

{Acetylene Gas Journal 1 

{Am Stillen Meer 2 

fAmerican Electrician 1 

t American Journal of Medical Science 1 

fAmerican Journal of Science 1 

'American Monthly 20 6 

fAmerican Naturalist 1 

'American Primary Teacher 1 

'American School Board Journal I 

t'Arena^ 4 

f Art Amateur 1 

{Art Journal.. 1 

{Association Review 1 

fAtlantic 8 6 

'Babyhood 1 

{Badminton 1 

f Banker's Magazine 1 

{Beet Sugar Gazette 1 

fBimetallisL 1 

t'Birds 2 

{Blackwood 1 

fBookbuyer 2 

f Bookman 1 

f{Book Reviews 1 

Bookseller 1 

Brochure Series 1 

{Brooklyn Medical Journal 1 

Bureau of American Republics 1 



▲ppBNDix vn 35 



CopiBt. School. 

fBntinefls 1 

California Municipalities 1 

{Cambridge Encyclopaedia. 1 

Cassier's Magazine 1 

t»Catholic World 2 

J»Centnry 28 6 

tChamber's Journal 1 

tCharities Review 1 

t*Chautauquan 2 1 

♦Child Garden 4 

•Child Study 4 

tChriatian Science Journal.^ 1 

City Government 1 

Commons. 1 

tiConsnlar Reports. 1 

{Contemporary Review 1 

t^Cosmopolitan. 10 2 

tCiitic 2 

{Cumulative Index 1 

Cumulative Book Index 1 

fCurrent History 1 

t*Current History 1 

{•Current Literature 10 2 

•Delineator 1 

t*Eclectic 2 

t*Bducation 1 

Education 1 

•Educational Foundations 1 

{•Educational Review 1 

Educational Review.. 1 

{Elliott's Magazine 1 

tEngineering Magazine 1 

{Engineer's Review 1 

•Etude 1 

Fancier's Monthly 1 

tFigaro Illustr^ 1 

{Finance 1 

t^Forum 6 2 

tFortnightly Review.. 1 

{Fraternity 1 

^Geographical Journal 1 



36 



LOS ANGEIiltS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



COPXS8. School. 



tGeological Magazine 

»Good Health 

*Qood Honsekeeping 

{•Harper 

{Healer 

House Beautifal 

{Home Cniaade 

{Hotel Gazette and Onting News. 

tinland Printer 

{Insurance Snn 

International Monthly 

{International Studio 

flrrigation Age 

tjoumal of Botany 

tjoomal of Franklin Institnte.... 

{Journal of Knights of Labor 

fKindergarten Magazine 

•Kindergarten Magazine 

•Kindergarten Review. 

fKnowledge 

•Ladiea Home Journal 

{Ladies of Maccabees 

{Lamp 

{{Land of Sunshine 

•Land of Sunshine 

{Law Notes 

{Liberty Review 

{Library Journal 

tLibrary World 

•Lippincott 

t{Literary News 

tLiterary World 

•Little Folks 

t*McClure 

{Missionary Review 

•Modem Methodr 

Modem Mexico 

Money 

Municipal Engineering 

fMusic 

{Musical Critic. 



28 



10 



6 



4 
10 



APPSNDiz vn 



37 



tNational Review 

National Single Tazer 

tNautilns 

t*New Sngland Magazine 

fNineteenth Century 

*Norma] Instmctor 

t*North American Review.. 

'Northwestern Monthly 

tOpen Court 

t*Outing 

t*Overland ^ 

{Pacific Unitarian 

tPall Mall Magazine 

iParadise of the Pacific. 

Personal Impressions 

{Pet Stock Tribune 

fPhotographic Times 

'Popular Education 

t*Popular Science Monthlf 

'Primary Education 

Progre s s 

{Public Libraries 

{Ralston Magazine 

'Recreation 

{Republic Pioneer 

{Resources of California 

t'Review of Reviews 

t{Rural Califomian 

t'St. Nicholas 

tSanitarian 

'School and Home 

'School Review 

{Scientific American, Builders' Edition. 
J'Scribncr 

'Short Stories 

{Social Forum 

{Sound Currency 

{Sound Money^ 

t{Southem California Practitioner 

Sugar Beet 

Teacher's Institute 



CopxBS. School. 
1 
1 
1 
3 
I 

1 
8 2 

1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

3 1 
4 

1 
6 
1 

4 

1 

1 
6 
1 
12 6 

1 

2 

1 

28 6 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



38 



LOS ANGBI.BS PX7BUC UBRARY 



♦Teacher's World 

Telephone Magazine 

Theosophical Review. , 

fTraveler M« • 

{Traveler's Record , 

Truth 

tUnivenal Brotherhood 

lUnivernty of California. 

{Vegetarian 

{Washington News Letter 

West American Molluscs 

fWest American Scientist 

♦Western Journal of Bducation. 

tWestminster Review 

{Whittier Boys and Girls 

JZoe 



COPIBS. 8CBOOL> 

•a... X 



BI-nONTHLY. 

t American Antiquarian 

American Journal of Sociology. 

fAmerican Law Review 

{Annals American Academy of Political and 
Social Science 

Bulletin Cooper Ornithological Club 

University Chronicle 

QUARTERLY. 



fAmerican Anthropologist 

:tAmerican Historical Review 

♦American Historical Review 

American Journal of Architecture 

fAuk 

fBulletins American Geographical Society. 

Economic Journal 

tEdinburg Review 

international Journal of Ethics 

{Johns Hopkins University Studies 

tjoumal American Polk-Lore. 

Journal of Political Economy 

Library 



APP9MDIX vn 39 



Oonu. School. 

tMind 1 

tMonist 1 

tMnnidpalAffdin. 1 

tPalestine Bzploration Fund 1 

tPoetl/ore 1 

^Political Science Quarterly 1 

*Political Science Quarterly. 1 

Proceedings Academy Natural Science 1 

t Publications American Economic Association.. 1 

Publications American Statistical Association. 1 

Quarterly Journal of Economics 1 

tQuarterly Review 1 

JYale Review 1 

TRI-ANNUAL. 

{Pedagogical Seminary.. 1 

SEMI-ANNUAL. 

tBraitbwaite's Retrospect 1 



40 



AFKCNDIX Vm. 



Donors to the Library 



Aberdeen Public Library 

Acker, Finley 

Alabama, Auburn Experiment Station 

Alabama, Canebrake Agricultural Experiment 

Station 

Allen, Lane and Scott, Philadelphia 

American Anti-ImperialiBt League 

American Humane Association 

American Union League Association 

Amherst College 

Apprentices' Library Company, Philadelphia. 
Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station. . . . 
Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station.. 
Armour Institute of Technology, Chicago. . . • 

Ashbrldge, Samuel, Mayor, Philadelphia 

Balch, Thomas Willing, Philadelphia 

Balch, Edwin Swift, Philadelphia 

Bangor Public Library 

Barrows, H. D., Los Angeles 

Barton, Rev. W. E., Oak Park, 111 

Battersea Public Libraries, London, £3ng. . . . 

Beal, Mrs. M. A., Los Angeles 

Beer, William, New Orleans 

Belmont School, California 

Bennett College, Chicago 

Berea College, Kentucky 

Birmingham Free Libraries, England 

Blue Anchor Society, New York 

Bootle Free Library and Museum, Eng 

Bowdoin College 

Bridgeport Public Library 

Brlggs, Daniel B., XJtlca, N. Y 

Bronson Library Fund, Waterbury 

Brookllne Public Library 

Brooklyn Library 



• . » . 



. • . • 



.... 



1 
1 
1 



28 
1 



61 



1 
1 

I « • 

5 

1 

18 

3 

1 



1 
3 
3 
1 



1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 

3 

e 

2 



APPENDIX Vni 



41 



Books 



Brosnahan, Timothy, Woodstock, Md 

Brown University, Providence, R. I 

Bryn Mawr College 

Budd, Harry Steele, Loa Angeles 

Buffalo Public Library 

Burbank, W. F., Los Angeles 

Butterfleld, W. W 

California Academy of Sciences 

California Board of Bank Commissioners .... 
California Building and Loan Associations. . . 
Cal. League Republican Clubs, Los Angeles. . 
California Portland Cement Co., Los Angeles 

California State Library 

Cal. State Mining Bureau, San Francisco 

California, University of 

Cambridge Public Library 

Cardiff Free Libraries, Wales 

Carnegie Free Library, Alleghany 

Carnegie Library, Atlanta 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg 

Chandler, W. E., U. S. Senate 

Channing, Walter, N. T 

Chicago Board of Education 

Chicago Civil Service Commission 

Chicago-Kent College of Law 

Chicago Public Library 

Chicago, University of 

Cincinnati College of Music 

Cincinnati Museum Association 

Cincinnati Public Library 

Clark, Leonora I., Los Angeles 

Cleveland Public Schools 

Cleveland Public Library 

Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Fort Collins 

Columbia University 

Columbian University, Washington, D. C 

Concord Free Public Library 

Congressional Library 

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, 

New Haven 



Pamphurs 
8 
1 
1 



2 

< • 

1 
1 



3 



5 
2 
1 
2 
1 
« 
5 
11 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 

» • • 

1 
1 

43 
8 
1 
2 

14 

34 



42 



JJOS ANGBLBS PUBUC LIBRARY 



Cornell UnlTerBity 

Connecticut Bureau of Labor StatlsticB 

Council Bluffs Free Public Library 

Craig, Alexander, Chicago 

Crawford, Mrs. A., Los Angeles 

Croydon Public Libraries, Surrey, Bng 

Daniels, Qeorge H., New York 

Daniels, William Cooke, Denver 

Dartmouth College 

Dayton, P. L., Dayton, Ohio 

Depew, Chauncey M., N. T 

Dessery, A. B., Los Angeles 

Detroit City Clerk 

Detroit PubUc Library 

Doblnson, O. A., Los Angeles 

Dougal, F. H. ft Co., London 

Eau Claire Public Library, Wisconsin 

Blectrlc Flreprooflng Co., N. T 

Enoch Pratt Free Library 

Eyanston Free Public Library 

Farley, John H., Cleveland 

Farmer, James Eugene, Concord 

Ferry Hall Seminary, 111 

Field Columbian Museum, Chicago 

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Los Angeles 

Fits Public Library, Chelsea, Mass 

Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Vt 

Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Lake City 

Forbes Library, Northampton, Mass 

Friends Book Association, Philadelphia 

Friends Free Library, Qermantown, Penn 

Frye, Alexis Everett, Havana 

FuUerton, Alexander, N. T 

Goodhue, E. S., Los Angeles 

Goodhue, Edw. S., Honolulu 

Goodwin, James J., Hartford 

Grand Rapids Public Library 

Graves, J. A., Los Angeles 



Books Pamphlbts 

• • ■ • » 

• « • • Mf 

• • • ■ A 

^ • • • • 

X « • • • 



1 

2 
2 
2 
1 

> • • • 

1 
409 



65 



1 
1 



• • • • 



1 
1 



1 

1 



1 

11 

1 

1 
1 

35 
1 
1 

1 



APPSNDIZ VIII 



43 



Great Britain, Education Department 

Oriffltli, Dr. B. M., Los Angeles 

Grinnell, William Morton, New York 

Oroif , Miss 

Ouinn, J. M., Los Angeles 

Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y 

Hammersmith Public Libraries, London 

Hartford Public Library 

Harvard University 

Hazen, Dr. E. H., Los Angeles 

Hearst, Phoebe, International Architectural 

Compeucion 

Hessling, Bruno 

Hodges, Rev. J. Sebastian, Baltimore 

Holinsworth, C. B., London 

Holmes, Daniel, Los Angeles 

Holmes, Donald, Los Angeles 

Hooker, Mrs. J. D., Los Angeles 

Howard, O. E., Stanford 

Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station 

lies, Qeorge, Montreal 

Illinois, University of 

Indian Rights Association, Philadelphia 

Indiana Agricultural Experiment Station 

Indiana Department of Geology and Natural 

Resources 

Indianapolis Public Library 

Iowa Agricultural College 

Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids 

Iowa State Library 

James, Mrs. S. M., Los Angeles 

Jersey City Free Public Library 

John Crerar Library, Chicago 

Johns Hopkins University 

Jones, Buell H., Los Angeles 

Jones, John J., Los Angeles 

Joseph Burnett Co., Boston 

Judge, J. M. K., Philadelphia 

Kansas Agricultural College 

Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station.. 



Books Pamphlrts 
.... 5 



30 
1 



3 

1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
99 



1 
1 



1 
18 
1 
1 
5 
6 



.... 



169 
1 
4 
2 

17 
2 

27 

1 
1 
9 
3 
2 
149 
7 
1 
6 
2 
2 



69 
88 



44 LOS AKGSIfBS PUBUC LIBRARY 

Booioi Pakvhuits 

King, Horatio C.» Brooklyn...: 2 

Kongl, Unlversltetets, Sweden 1 

Kraemer, L. Adolf, Los Angeles 1 

Lafayette College, Penn 1 

Lamb, Inar, Lob Angeles 7 

Lampadlus, Malvlna Doris 1 

Lathe, Herbert W., Pasadena 1 .... 

Leeds Free Public Libraries, England 1 

Leland Stanford University 2 

Lembcke ft Buechner, N. T 1 

Llvermore, Cbarles W., Pasadena 65 

Liverpool Public Libraries, Museum and Art 

Gallery 1 

Los Angeles xsoard of Trade 1 

Los Angeles Health Department 11 

Louisiana Agricultural College 12 

Ludwlg Salvator, Archduke of Austria 1 

Lutz, Mary R., Monrovia 1 

Lynn Public Library 1 

MacCalla ft Co., Philadelphia 1 

MacDonald, Arthur, Washington, D. C 7 

McLellan, Mary B., Los Angeles 3 .... 

McMillan, James, u. s. s. •.•.•••••* .••.••.• l ..•. 

Magevney, Hev. Eugene, Chicago 3 

Maine University, Agricultural Experiment 

Station 30 

Maiden Puollc Library 1 

Manchester Free Public Libraries 1 

Marburg, Theodore, Baltimore 1 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station 29 

Maryland University 1 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 10 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, Hatch 

Station 31 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 

Massachusetts State Library 1 6 

Matsuka Masayoshl, Count, Tokyo 1 

Mechanics' Institute, San Francisco 12 

Mechanics' Institute, New York 1 

Melbourne, Australia, Town Clerk « 2 2 



APPENDIX VnX 



45 



Mercantile Ldbrary* Philadelphia 

Mercantile Library, New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.T 

Michelson, Mrs. C, Los Angeles 

Michigan Agricultural College 

Michigan, University of 

Milwaukee Public Library 

Milwaukee Public Schools 

Minneapolis Board of Education 

Minneapolis Board of Park Commissioners. . 

Minneapolis Public Library 

Minnesota Agricultural E2zperiment Station. 

Mississippi Agricultural College 

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis 

Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines 

Missouri Agricultural Experiment Station. . . 
Montana Agricultural E^zperiment Stations.. 
Montana Bureau of Agriculture, Labor and 

Industry 

Montclair Free Public Library, New Jersey. . 

Mount Holyoke College 

Murray, Thomas Hamilton 

Music Magazine Pub. Co., Chicago 

Mutual Life Insurance Co., N. T 

National Civil Service Reform League 

National Education Association 

Nebraska, University of 

Nebraska Agricultural E^xperiment Station. . 

Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station 

Newark Free Public Library 

New Bedford Free Public Library 

Newberry Library, Chicago 

New Britain Institute Library 

Newcaatle-Upon-Tyne Free Public Library. . . 
T^ew Hampshire Agricultural Experiment 

Station 

New Hampshire Historical Society 

New Haven Free Public Library 

New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station 
New Jersey Bureau of Statistics 



BOOKS PAlCPn.BT8 

4 
1 
2 



1 



29 

8 

5 

1 

1 

1 

8 

28 

14 

1 

1 

18 

IT 

1 
1 
1 



1 
2 
9 



• . • • 



8 
57 

7 
8 
1 
5 
2 

36 

1 

14 

76 

1 



46 



LOS AKGBLES PUBLIC LIBRARY 



New Mexico College of Agrictilture 

New South Wales Public Library* Sydney. . . 

Newton Free Library 

New York Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Geneva 

New York Agricultural Experiment Station, 

Cornell 

New York Bureau of Labor Statistics 

New York Civil Service Reform Association 

New York City Department of Education 

"New York Farmers/' New York City 

New York General Society of Mechanics and 

Tradesmen 

New York Public Library 

New York State Charities Aid Association. . . 

New York State Library 

New York Young Men's Christian Association 
North Carolina Agricultural Experiment 

Station 

No. Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station 

Northwestern Light Co., Los Angeles 

Oakland Free Library 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station 

Ohio Bureau of Labor Statistics 

Ohio State University 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station.. 

Omaha Public Library 

Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station.... 

Oregon, University 

Osterhout Free Library, Wilkesbarre, Penn. . 

Ottawa, Department of Interior 

Paterson Free Public Library 

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture 

Pennsylvania State College 

Pennsylvania, University of 

Peoria Public Library, 111 

Phelao, Mayor, San Francisco 

Philadelphia City Institute 

Philadelphia Commercial Museum 



Books Pampblbts 

31 

1 

1 



70 

43 
6 
1 
2 
1 

1 
11 

1 

14 

1 

19 

26 
1 
1 

63 
2 
1 
1 

11 
6 

22 
2 

12 

• • • 

4 

17 

10 

2 

2 

• ■ • 

1 
1 



2 
2 



APPBMDix vzn 



47 



Philadelphia Free Library 

Philadelphia Library Company 

Philadelphia Times 

Pomona College, Cal 

Poor, Henry V., N. Y 

Portland Library Association, Oregon 

Portland Public Library, Maine 

Portsmouth Public Library, Bng 

Pratt Institute Free Library 

Providence Libraries 

Providence Public Library 

Providence School Committee 

Quincy, Mass., Public Schools 

Redpath, Lionel V., Los Angeles 

Rhode Island State Agricultural School 

Robinson, Sara T. D., Kansas 

Rochdale Free Public Library, Eng 

St. George, Hanover Square Public Library. . 

St. Joseph Free Public Library 

St. Louis Mercantile Library Association. . . . 

St. Louis Merchants' Exchange 

Salem Public Library 

San Bernardino Public Library 

Sanders, Geo. L., Los Angeles 

San Francisco Board of Supervisors 

San Francisco Public Library 

San Jose Jubilee Celebration Committee 

Sanitary Record Pub. Co 

Santa Clara College 

Sayle, Robert, Los Angeles 

Scofleld, C. C, Soldiers' Home 

Scott, Lawson, Los Angeles 

Scranton Public Library 

Seattle Public Library 

Seattle, Puget Sound Bureau of Information 

Seibert, Mrs. R. S., Los Angeles 

Sheffield Free Public Libraries, Eng 

Sheppard and St. John, London 

Shibley, George H., N. Y 

Shinn, Charles H., Los Angeles 



Books Paiipbx.bt» 

1 
1 



• ■ • • 



1 
2 

3 

8 
2 
1 
I 
1 
3S 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
9 
1 
1 

I ■ ■ 

13 
1 



2 

11 

4 



1 
2S 



48 



IfOS ANGBLBS PUBUC UBRA&Y 



• • • • 



Sierra Club, San Francisco 

Silver, Hermann, Los Angeles 

Smiley, Albert K., N. Y 

Smith Ck>llege 

Social Reform Union, W. D. P. Bliss, Al- 
hambra 

Society of Colonial Wars 

South Australia Public Library, Museum and 
Art Gallery 

South Carolina Agricultural College 

South Dakota Agricultural College 

Southwest Guide Co., Los Angeles 

Speiden, William, N. Y 

Springfield City Library 

Springfield Public Schools 

Steams, Dr. Robert B. C, Los Angeles 

Stevens, B. F., Los Angeles 

Stockton City Superintendent of Schools. . . . 

Storrs School Agricultural Experiment 
Station 

Swift, Morrison I., Los Angeles 

Syracuse Central Library 

Taylor, C. F., & Frank Parsons, Philadelphia 

Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station. . 

Texas Agricultural ISxperlment Station 

Toronto Public Library 

Towle Manufacturing Company, Mass 

Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress 

Tufts Library, Mass 

Utah Agricultural Experiment Station 

Utley, A. J., Los Angeles 

Vandergrift Land and Improvement Co 

Vermont Agricultural College 

Virginia Agricultural Sbcperlment Station. . . . 

Warder Public Library, Springfield, O 

Warren Co. Library and Reading Room Asso- 
ciation, Monmouth, 111 

Washington State Agricultural College 

Waters, Russell J., Washington 

Wesleyan University, Conn 



2 



1 
1 

22 



1 

26 

40 

11 

1 

6 

1 

6 

1 

1 

12 
1 



40 
2 

1 

2 

52 

1 

84 
63 

1 

2 

22 

1 

2 



APPBNDIX vin 49 



Books PAMnu.BTt 

W. Virginia Agricultural Bxperiment Station 21 

Whitfield, A. A., Los Angeles 1 .... 

Wicks, M. L. Jr., Los Angeles 1 

Widney, J. P., Los Angeles 1 .. . 

Wigan Free Public Library, Bng 1 

Wilmington Institute, Del 1 

Wilshire, H. Gaylord, Los Angeles 6 

Wisconsin State Board of Education 1 

Wisconsin State Historical Society 1 

Wisconsin State Superintendent of Schools 5 

Wisconsin University Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station 29 

Wolfe, W. C, Kansas City 1 .... 

Wolverhampton Free Library Commission 1 

Wood, Henry, Boston 2 .... 

Worcester Free Public Library 1 

Wright, Isaac A., Kansas City 10 

Wyoming Agricultural Bxperiment Station 20 

Yale University 2 

Anonymous 8 2 



"U 



i > <3 4 ^> ^/ J . ^ <: 



^■. 



Los Angeles Public Library 



Annual Report 



of the 



Board of Directors 



and 



Librarian 



1900-1901 



>^^ 






# 



V 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Los Angeles Public Library 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN 



DECEMBER, 1901 



Los Angeles Public Library. 



DIRECTORS. 

J. Ross Ci^RK, President, 
Isidore B. Dockwbii^sr. 
D. W. Edblman. 
Lbb a. Phillips. 
J. W. Trueworthy. 



COMMITTEES. 

Attendants : D. W. Edelman, Lee A. Phillips. 
Auditing and Accounts : LEE A. Phillips, J. W. Trueworthy. 
Books and Donations : I. B. DocKWEiLER, Lee A. Phillips. 
Printing and Supplies : J. W. Trukworthy, D. W. Edelman. 
Rules and Administration : I. B. Dockweilkr, J. W. TrueworTH Y. 

The President is a member of all committees. 



Mary L. Jones, Librarian and Clerk of the Board. 
Celia GlEason, Assistant Librarian. 

Nora A. Millek, Second Assistant Librarian. 

Regular meetings of the Board on the first and fourth Fridays 
of each month, at 4 : 30 p. m. 



PRINCIPALS OF DEPARTMENTS. 

Florence Thori^burg, School. 
Anna Mc C. Beckley, Reference. 
Helen a. Nevin, Cataloguing. 
Gertrude E. Darlow, Classification. 
Mabel S. Dunn, Fiction. 
Mary A, Johnson, Accession. 
Pearl B. Glbason, Finance. 
Mamib Bbnnbtt, Mail. 
Christine Clark, Registration. 
Mae D. Blanchard, Juxfenile. 



GENERAL ATTENDANTS. 

Georgia Horgan. Ella S. Morgan. Stella C. Beckley. 

May E. Reach. Ethblwyn H. Faggb. Jane L. Shepard. 
Rose Ebbrhart. Josephine Dancaster. Anna Madison. 
Dora I^. Mason. Clara Hindle. EmilibJackson. 

Prances F.NiSBET. Victoria Ellis. Julia Witman. 

Bertha B. Kane. Ida G. Munson. Grace M. White. 

Bell Smith. Margbrbt Mblzer. Jessblyn Andrews. 

Bessie L. Bbnz, Substitute. 



Dbnnis Johnson, Janitor. 

Hannah Cronin, Cleaner. 



REPORT 

OPTHB 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

OPTHB 

Los Angeles Public Library 



DBCBMBBR. 1901. 



To the Council of iJ^e City of Los Angeles: 

Gentlemen; In accordance with the requirements of 
the City Charter, the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles 
Public Library herewith submit their report for the year 
ending November 30th, 1901: 

This Board went into office under appointment of the 
Mayor, Hon. M. P. Snyder, on April 2, 1901. 

Attached hereto and made a part hereof is the report to Librarian's 
us of the Librarian of the Los Angeles Public Library, which ■^•p^^ 
furnishes a detailed statement of the operations of the 
Library, and contains all the data required by the City 
Charter, and to which reference Is hereby made for full 
particulars. 

For the current fiscal year ending June 30th, 1902, your Financial 
honorable body wisely allotted to the Library as its portion 
of the $1.00 tax rate limit, four and five-tenths cents on each 
$100.00 of assessed valuation, thereby giving us an esti- 
mated sum of $31,654.79, which furnished about $1600.00 
more than was allowed for Library purposes the preceding 
year. In addition it may be remarked that we have had 
more money for this current year than has ever bee«i allotted 
to our Library In any year of Its existence. 



LOS ANGELES PUBLIC LIBRART. 



Appointment 
rf AMlftant 
Librarian 



Jbrary Force 



»alary List 



.Ibrary 
'raining Ctesa 



blames, 
lemberahlp 
nd 
Ircuiatlon 



Nevertheless, the ever growing demand upon our 
finances more than offsets such increased allowance, and it 
is a constant source of anxiety on the part of this Board to 
reduce necessary and legitimate expenditures to the amount 
of our income. 

Recognizing the necessity of so doing, this Board filled 
the position of Second Assistant Librarian, then vacant, by 
the appointment of Miss Nora Miller on June 14th, 1901, to 
take effect July 1st, 1901, and in promoting her* to this posi- 
tion we strictly observed the Civil Service rules of the 
Library that have been in force for the past ten years and 
more. 

Under the supervision of this Board, the Library is now 
conducted by a Librarian, two Assistant Librarians, ten 
principals of departments and twenty-two general attendants, 
besides two employees; who attend to the Janitor service. 

The present monthly salary list of the Library now 
aggregates the sum of $1307.50. 

We do not believe that there is another department of 
the city government which is administered as economically 
as the library, and in which the employees are more poorly 
paid for the services rendered. ♦ • • 

Since the establishment of the Library Training Class 
in 1891 there have been graduated therefrom 64 members, of 
whom there are none now remaining who are eligible for and 
desirous of positions as Library attendants. Therefore, con- 
sidering the future needs of the Library, we appointed eight 
young ladies to the fourteenth Library Training Class instead 
of six, the usual number. In this connection we are happy to 
state that other libraries frequently call upon our Library 
for assistance and request the occasional and sometimes the 
permanent services of our graduates, many of whom are 
winning distinguished places in the library world. 

Thej library has now 67,354 volumes, 4107 pamphlets, 417 
maps and 3336 pictures. 

There are 22,015 registered card holders entitled to 
library prlvllegeB. During the pant year 472,648 volumes 
have been circulated for home use, and 191,296 volumes for 
immediate use in the library rooms. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORfi. 



Ever since 1S92 there has been more or leas agitation for New Library 
a separate library building which would enable our citizens Needed" 
to take advantage of the opportunities of our library for 
study, research and recreation. What heretofore has been a 
demand for more convenient and commodious quarters has 
now, however, become an actual and Impelling necessity. 
The library at present occupies the entire third floor of the 
City Hall, has filled the garret, and is even now crowding the 
cellar. If there is any other space in, near or about the City 
Hall that the City Council has not already set aside for 
other public uses, or if so set aside, can nevertheless be 
reassigned for library purposes, we herewith make application 
therefor; for something must at once be done to relieve our 
already overcrowded condition and make room for future 
accessions. Because of a lack of room the library staff is 
also seriously hampered in properly serving the public. 

Unless the situation is soon improved, the board fears 
that it will be obliged to close the general newspaper and 
reading room and devote the space now occupied by it for 
the storage of books. This, however, cannot be accomplished 
except at the expense of hundreds of library patrons who are 
least able to afford such a decided change. The well-to-do 
residents, and those fairly circumstanced in life, most usually 
take away their reading matter and enjoy it amid the com- 
fbrts and environments of the home, but many of the library 
patrons are tourists having no local abode except the hotel, 
to which they do not care to take the library literature. 
Many others merely room out, and it is inconvenient for them 
to take from the library books or magazines (papers not 
being permitted to be withdrawn,) and there Is the large 
num'beii of students who require proper space to pursue their 
investigations and study with some degree of comfort, and 
for whom the suggestion of withdrawing their study mate- 
rials will be well nigh Impossible. Such patrons and many 
others will suffer greatly the loss or suppression of the read- 
ing room. But what can this Board do? More space Is abso- 
lutely required. Books must be bought from year to year to 
keep the library abreast of the times; more books must be 
purchased to bring the library down to these times. The city 
Is growing In population at a wonderful rate. In 1880 we had 



8 LOS ANOEI4B8 PUBLIC I4BRART. 



11,311 inhabitants; In 1890, 50,000; in 1900, 101,000, and now 
we count our poulation at approximately 120,000. Needlem 
to say, our library patrons increase proportionately. They 
must be taken care of. The needs of the public must be 
attended to. For after the public school system the library 
ranks next in importance in the community. The imperioiu 
call for additional space can not be satisfied, so far as the 
City Hall is concerned. Poseibly temporary makeshifts may 
abate for a few months, or a year at best, the present impera- 
tive necessity, but occasional patchwork relief will serve 
only to whet the library building appetite, which, "Phoenix 
like," must soon arise to add an additional feature to our 
municipal financial puzzle. 

We all know that the long-talked-of and much-needed 
library building can only be made possible by the proper 
award of public funds or the generous prompting of private 
donation. 

As to the latter source our efforts have so far been 
unavailing, but as it is said, "hope springs eternal in the 
human breast," we have cherished the expectation that Mr. 
Carnegie, the distinguished philanthropist, or some other 
equally munificent donor, would remember our necessttlee. 
But in the absence of a definite promise we must look to 
other means. 

As to the first mentioned source, we find that our present 
City Charter provides that its bonded indebtedness most not 
exceed, in the aggregate, two million dollars, except for the 
purpose of providing water works for the city and establish- 
ing and constructing a sewer system. 

From the latest obtainable reports we find that the total 
sum of the city's bonded indebtedness (exclusive of water 
works and sewer bonds) amounted on November 30, 1901, 
to 1976.125.00. 

The city can therefore vote additional bonds to the extent 
of $1,000,000.00 and over. Now is the time, when in our 
opinion, the needs of the library may be properly left to a 
vote of the people. A library building and its equipment 
commensurate with the importance of our city, and the 
demands of the library will cost not less than $390,000.00, 
exclusive of the site. As the question of voting sewer and 
school bonds is now also being agitated, we ask your Hon- 



REPORT OF THB BOARD OF DIRSSCTOR0. 



orable Body, when placing other bonding proposltionB before 
the people to submit at the same time, the matter of voting 
the Issuance of bonds In the sum of $350,000.00 for the con- 
vtructlon and equipment of a library building. 

In conclusion we desire to thank the library force for its 
assiduous and uniform attention to duty, and we hereby 
gratefully acknowledge, on behalf of the library, its patrons 
and ourselves, our debt of gratitude to you, gentlemen of the 
Council, for your past consideration for library needs, and 
earnestly pray for its continuance. 



Respectfully submitted. 



J. ROSS CLARK, 
ISIDORB B. DOCKWEILER, 
J. W. TRUBWORTHY, 
D. W. BDKLMAN, 
LEE A. PHILLIPS. 



December 27th, 1901. 



Report of Librarian 

1900-1901 



To the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Public Library: 
(Jentlemen: I have the honor to submit the thirteenth 

annual report of the Los Angeles Public Library, covering 

the year ending November 30th, 1901. 

The condition of the library, together with the work 

accomplished, is herewith presented by departments and in 

tabulated statements: 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The City Council apportioned to the Library Fund for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1902, four and five-tenths cents 
($.045) on each one hundred dollars of taxable prot»erCy in 
the city, amounting under the present assessed valuation, to 
thirty-one thousand, six hundred fifty-four dollars and seventy- 
nine cents (131,664.79). As will be seen in Appendix 8, this 
rate has been equalled but once before in the history of the 
library. With the increase of the assessed valuation of the 
city, the library's incomei is now more nearly adequate to its 
needs than ever before, the maximum limit of five cents 
having never yet been apportioned. 

Cash Receipts. 

Cash on hand from 1899-1900 $ 7,182.71 

Received balance of apportionment, 1900-1901 13,629.80 

Received on apportionment, 1901-1902 19,371.78 

Transferred fund 3,676.00 

Cash received for fines 1,469.12 

Cash received for dues 16.60 

Cash received for postal cards sold 90.52 

Cash received for finding lists sold 167.70 

Cash received for supplies, etc., sold .96 

Cash received for lost books paid for 104.43 

$46,607.46 



REa>ORT OF THB LIBRARIAN. 



ii 



Cash Expenditures. 

Salaries ^^. 116,233.28 

Books $9,404.00 

Periodicals 1,490.61 

kndlng 2,628.21 



13,522.72 



Lost books returned and money refunded 12.82 

Pfflce supplies 1,007.13 

Printing 109.90 

Finding lists 772.25 

Postage 124.00 

Freight and cartage 402.97 

Lighting 12.70 

General expense 297 .23 

Insurance 532.00 

Alterations and repairs 222. 25 

Furniture and fixtures — 

Shelving $149.50 

Telephone 7.00 

Linoleum '. .... 365.59 

Pamphlet cases 25 . 00 

Rugs 20.00 

Awnings 18.50 

Carpentry work in attic 60.00 

Rubber stamps 9.75 

Perforator 25.75 

Stools 11.80 

Office safe 108.00 

Oak desk 17.50 

Tin trays 6.00 



824.89 



Balance, treasurer 11,317.10 

Balance, petty cash 116.72 

$45,607.46 



12 LOS ASQVUBB PX7BLIC LIBRASIT. 



Deposit Account. 
Receipts — 

November 30th» 1900, to balance I 214. 26 

November SOth, 1901, to receipts 945. 25 

11,159.50 
Bzpenditures — 

November 3dth, 1901, deposits returned | 860.06 

November 3dth, 1901, balance tmst fund 299.46 



11,159.50 

School Library Fund. 
Receipts — 

November 30th, 1900, balance I 170. 42 

December 21st, 1900, apportionment 1,500.00 

11,670.42 
Expenditures — 

November 30th, 1900, books I 170.73 

March 30th, 1901, periodicals 272.95 

June 30th, 1901, books 244.07 

July 31st, 1901, books 973.16 

July 31&t, 1901, periodicals 1.50 

November 30th, 1901, balance 8.01 



11,670.42 
CIRCULATION. 

During: the year just closed the library was open for the 
exchange of books 303 days, and the reference and reading 
rooms were open 362 days. Aside from the regular Christ- 
mas closing the building was closed upon the occasion of the 
President's visit to the city during the Fiesta, May 9th, and 
again upon the day of the funeral, September 19th. 

Detailed statements of the year's circulation will be 
found in its various phases in Appendixes 4, 5, 6 and 7, also 
in the special reports under individual departments. In the 
case of the home circulation the figures are accurate, the 
results of definite records. The statement of the library 



RE3PORT OF THB LIBRARIAN. 13 



use is an estimate being simply the number of books left 
upon the reading tables and replaced on the shelves by 
attendants. As a basis of comparison with our work from 
time to time, it is, of course, useful, and may form a fair 
basis of comparison with other libraries haying open access 
to the shelves. No attempt is made to record the use of 
newspapers and magazines in the reading rooms^ nor of the 
number of readers except in the reference room and general 
library. 

Among the notable events of the year was the granting 
of non-fiction cards to readers. This privilege was voted by 
the Board in January, and 13,000 additional cards have been 
issued to date. The crowded condition of the library has its 
effect upon the home use of books, both retarding and 
increasing circulation. Situated as the library is, on the 
third floor of the City Hall, but one small elevator is forced 
to do duty for the entire building; and the service is wholly 
inadequate to the demand placed upon it. In addition the 
corridors and reading rooms are so crowded that many would- 
be readers are kept away from the library entirely. On the 
other hand the reading rooms are so small, the ventilation 
so imperfect, and the noise of the street below, and of the 
people passing through the rooms so annoying, that many 
who would prefer to read at the library content themselves 
with books for home use only. 

REGISTRATION. 

Unexpired (estimated) 6,500 

Re-reglstratlon, December Ist, 1900 7,177 

Re-registration for the year (men) 2903 

Re-reglstratlon for the year (women) 4967 

Renewals 649 

Withdrawals 188 

Net increase 8,338 

Total registration 22,016 

Notices sent 727 

Contagious disease notices sent 301 

Lost card checks issued. 1,296 

Change of address noted 1,937 

Non-fiction cards issued 13,000 



}' 



LOS ANQSUBB PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



The re-regl8tratlon of patrons under the new system was 
commenced Koveiiber 8th, ifesd/aliit'has yet 'one year to fto 
before an accurate report of' '{he number' of ftve^'meihbers 
can be made. 

Under the revision of the rules and regulations noted 
elsewlierd two important changes were made directly dttectp 
ing this department. Applicants for cards owning real estate 
in the city' may dispense ' with guarantors. In addition 
to the regular cards issued to readers, non-fiction cards may 
be had upon application, a measure which has proved most 
popular. A new systeni of records was adopted in January 
whereby the original guarantor's cards and reader's applfcsr 
tions are filed, rather than copies as heretofore, the clerickl 



work of the department being much reduced in consequence. 

ACCESSIONS AND BINDING. 

Volumes added ld,549 

Volumes lost and returned 22 

Volumes discarded ....!. 1,238 

Volumes lost and paid for 58 

Volumes lost by re-binding 23 

Volumes lost by difference in record 352 

Volumes unaccounted for 1,524 

Total volumes in Library 67,354 

Pamphlets added 754 

Total pamphlets in Library 4,107 

Maps added 10 

Total maps in Library 417 

Pictures added 500 

Total pictures in Library 3,836 

Volumes sent to binder 7,068 

Volumes returned from binder 5,168 

Volumes mended 34,053 

A detailed statement of accessions by classes will be 
found in Appendix 3. In Appendix 8 is noted the number of 
volumes added during each of the seven years past, with the 
net number of volumes in the library at the close of eaibh 
year. A gratifying increase in the working stock of 'the 
library is here set forth. Of the 10,549 volttmes added d&r- 



REPORT OP THE LIBRARIAN. J5 



ing the past year, 2^7 were acquired by gitt, a detailed list 
of those to whom the Ulirary is thiis indebted being found In 
Appendix 10. The public documents acquired through the 
Superintendent of Documents and the various departments 
were 668 in number. Seventy-one volumes were books in the 
library, but not accessioned at the beginning of the year. Of 
books bought, 1,986 were purchased from the school library 
fund, and 7,638 were paid for from the general library fund. 
It should be noted that this year's expenditures also Include 
the cost of 498 volumes of United States Patent Office pub- 
lications purchased in October, but received too late to be 
Included in this year's accessions. 



The increase in the number of books bound and re-bound 
should be noted. Last year 4,673 volumes were bound at a 
cost of $1,492.84, or an average of 31.94 cents per volume. 
During the present year 6,168 volumes have been bound at a 
cost of $2,628.21, or an average of 46.79 cents per volume. 
The difference in the average price is due to a slight increase 
In the binding rate, and especially to the fact that a greater 
number of books have been bound in the more expensive 
materials, it oeing the present policy to bind all reference 
books in half morocco. The tri-yearly inventory took place 
during the months of January, February and March, with the 
result Indicated in the foregoing table. Owing to the fact 
that the fiction department had been completely re-catalogued, 
and hence thoroughly checked, no further inventory was 
made, nor was there in the case of Juvenile fiction, which Is 
undergoing the same process. The number of volumes in the 
library, with its growth from year to year, has been based 
upon the accession records. In addition to the careful inven- 
tory, the books themselves have been counted during the 
year, and a discrepancy of 362 volumes is the result. This 
number may easily be accounted for by the fact that many 
pamphlets, plates, etc., originally accessioned as books are 
no longer shelMlsted as such. The net figure of 67,364 vol- 
umes may be considered as accurate b> two different counts. 
While the inventory is made once In three years. It has not 
been feasible to state the exact number missed since it was 
last taken. The 1,624 volumes then Is the total loss to the 
library in the thirteen years of its history. 



16 LOS ▲NGELAS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



CLASSIFICATION AND SHELF. 

Number of volumes classified and shelf listed: 

Classes, circulating, new 1,002 

Classes, circulating, duplicate 1,498 

Classes, circulating. Juvenile 1,513 

Classes, reference 1,3^06 

Magazines, circulating 178 

• Re-classified 280 

Total 6,727 

Fiction Cutter number assigned: 

Adult 2,106 

Juvenile, new 1,810 

Juvenile, changed 1,009 

Books discarded and noted in shelf list 453 

New shelf sheets have been typewritten, one for oflicial 
use and one for the public, covering each of the following 
classes: Music, Theology, French, Gtorman, Spanish, Italian, 
Philology, Useful Arts, Fine Arts, Social Science and Juvenile 
classes. The cumbersome shelf list of general fiction is being 
transferred from the sheets to the author or main card of 
the official catalogue. It is hoped that this measure will 
obviate the necessity of the frequent re-writing heretofore 
required. The work has progressed to the letter B. The 
re-numbering of Juvenile fiction according to the Cutter and 
Sanborn tables is in progress, 1,000 volumes having been 
re-numbered and shelf listed. 

CATALOGUING. 

Number of volumes catalogued: 

Accessions in Classes 300^900, inclusive 2927 

Class 200 1119 

Fiction, adult 770 

Fiction, Juvenile 243 

Classes 000-200 and music (bulletin cards only) 681 

Total number of books 5397 

Approximate number of cards added to catalogue, 20,200. 



REPORT OP THE LIBRARIAN. 17 



The important work of this department aside from the 
current cataloguini; of accessions has been the completion 
of the cataloguing of Class 200, Religion, begun in Sep- 
tember, 1899, and finished in Noyember, 1901. Cards for 
about 1950 volumes in this class have been filed in the 
catalogue of the general library, greatly facilitating the 
use of this important group of books. Work on Class 100, 
Philosophy, will be undertaken at once, and being a rela- 
tively small class, there is every hope that it will be com- 
pleted during the coming year. 

A new catalogue of juvenile fiction has been under- 
taken simultaneously with the changing of the book num- 
bers and will progress as opportunity affords. Duplicate 
cards for all accessions to the clas8«$s in the juvenile de- 
partment are being made, forming the beginning of a sec- 
ond dictionary card catalogue for the special use of the 
school and juvenile departments. Heretofore, entries have 
been made in the main catalogue only. 

The library has become a subscriber to the printed 
cards to be issued by the Library of Congress, as it was 
from the first of those issued by the Publishing Section 
of the American Library Association. It is hoped to take 
advantage of the increased facilities offered, not only in 
the case of current additions, but in the ultimate replac- 
ing of typewritten, by printed cards. 

REFERENCE. 

Volumes, December 1, 1900 15,996 

Volumes added, miscellaneous 669 

Volumes added, magazines 845 

Volumes added, documents 668 

Volumes discarded 1 

Net increase 2091 

Total volumes 18,087 

Books consulted 104,268 

Pictures used 6314 

Readers (estimated) 38,606 

As in the general library, the statement of the num- 
ber of books conbulted is based upon the number replaced 



IB LOS ANGBUaS PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



by the attendants, and falls far within tbe true state of 
aftairs. 

The work of this department, more than any other, is 
hampered by the crowded state of the library. The room 
devoted to its use is 24x27 feet. In this small room, filled 
with books on the walls and in floor cases, were accom- 
modated not less than 88,000 readers. But a small portion 
of the reference books are really shelved in the reference 
room. The balance are placed wherever a spare shelf may 
be found; in the attic, the basement, the offices or In 
the fiction department, to reach which latter, three rooms 
and a corridor must be traversed. The removal of the 
documents from the attic to the basement was accom- 
plished in January. Though the room secured is lighted 
and ventilated artificially, the convenience is so mucli 
greater and the menace to the safety of the building so 
much less, that the change is appreciated, and the use 
of the documents much facilitated. The record kept shows 
the use of the documents brought from this room to the 
main reference room only. Were it possible to preserve 
a count of all used in the document room, the figures 
would be much increased. 

Aside from school and study club work. Class 600, 
Useful Arts, has been found to have the largest percentage 
of readers, works on engineering and mining being most 
called for. To meet this demand, besides numerous mis- 
cellaneous works, complete files have been added of the 
Transactions of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, 
of the American Institute of Electrical Elngineers, Conven- 
tions of the National BSectric Light Association, and the 
Specifications and Drawings of the Patent Ofllce of the 
United States. Natural science stands next in use, and 
of this class botany is the subject most called for. Nu- 
merous works have been added during the year, prominent 
among which are: Bentham, Genera Plantarum; Engler and 
Prantl, Die Naturlichen Pflanzenfamilien ; Mfiller, Eucalyp- 
tographia; Bentham and Milller, Flora Australiensis ; Sac- 
cardo, Sylloge Fungorum. 

The quarto edition of Audubon's "Birds of America," 
Nansen's "Norwegian North Polar Expedition," and the see- 



RBPORT OF THB LIBRARIAN. 19 



ond series of Tryon's ''Manual of Choncology" are further 
works of science added during the past year. Many worlu 
of value to the student of the history of the Spanish South- 
west have been added, among which are to be found: Alcedo, 
Diccionario Oeografico Historico de las Indlas Occidentales; 
Berlstain y Souza» Biblioteca Hispaao Americana Senten- 
trional; Sahagun, Hlstorla General de Nueva £)spa&a; San- 
chez, Theatre Americano; Zanacois, Hlstoria de Mejico. 

Of general works the following are among the most yal- 
ued additions: Brockhaus, Konyersations-Lexikon; Larousse, 
Nouveau Illustre Dictionnaire; Webster, International Dic- 
tionary (19M) edition); Thwaites, Jesuit Relations (com- 
pleted); Dictionary' of National Biography (completed); 
Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words; 
Wright, Bkiglish Dialect Dictionary; Sturgess, Dictionary 
of Architecture and Building; Droysens, Historischer Hand 
Atlas; Mttller, Handbuch der Klassischen Altertums Wis- 
senschaft; Stieler, Hand Altas; Munsell's American Ances- 
try. 

Of magazines the following flies have been completed; 
Athenaeum, Chamber's Journal, Chautauquan, Electric Bin- 
gineerlng, Bvery Saturday, (Geographical Journal, Harper's 
Weekly, International Studio, Notes and Queries, Pall Mall, 
Public Opinion. 

Complete sets of the following have been added; 
American Catholic Quarterly Review, Architectural Record, 
B^nomic Journal, Comhill, Macmillan, Magazine of Art, 
Munsey, Quarterly Journal of Economics. Various impor- 
tant bibliographies and reading lists have been prepared, 
a few of which are published in the Monthly Bulletin. In 
addition a list is given each month of the bibliographies 
prepared, which may be consulted in manuscript in the 
reference room. 



20 LOS ANGEJL.BB PUBUC LIBRARY. 



GENERAL LIBRARY. 

Volumes, December 1, 1900 24,476 

Volumes added ' 2721 

Volumes lost and returned 14 

Volumes discarded 75 

Volumes lost and paid for 34 

Volumes unaccounted for 1064 

Net gain 1562 

Total volumes November 30, 1901 26,038 

Circulation, home 68,464 

Circulation, library 42,725 

Totel 111,189 

Readers (estimated) 17,093 

Notices sent 2693 

Reserve postals sold 629 

Reserve postals mailed 635 

Detailed statements of the circulation of books known 
as the "classes" shelved in this department will be found 
in Appendixes 4, 5 and 6, and a classification of additions 
with the total number in each class is set forth in Ap- 
pendix 3. A gain of some twenty thousand volumeai in 
circulation, or five per cent, over last year's use, is directly 
attributable to the use of non-fiction cards. The problem 
confronting us in this department is the question of book 
space. Additional shelving has been built during the year 
past, but this is practically exhausted, and the strength 
of the building forbids further extension. It is hoped that 
some solution of the problem may soon be reached. 

FICTION DEPARTMENT. 

Volumes December 1, 1900 11,866 

Volumes added 2,180 

Volumes lost and returned 4 

Volumes discarded 728 

Volumes lost and paid for 31 

Net gain 1,425 

Total volumes 13,291 

Books circulated 216,086 

Reserve postals sold 1,619 

Reserve postals mailed 1,490 

Notices sent 1,915 



REPORT OF THa LIBRARIAN. 21 



Progress in this department has been most marked dur- 
ing the past year. The new catalogue of fiction, noted in 
my last report, was made available to the public early in 
the year both in its printed and card form. The card 
catalogrue has been kept to date, and the printed finding 
list supplemented by current accessions noted in the 
Monthly Bulletin. The increase in circulation over last 
year has been 15,933. In spite of the increased facilities, 
however, the percentage of the circulation of fiction to 
the entire home circulation is but 45 per cent., against 
65 per cent last year, a state of affairs due no doubt to 
the extended use of non-fiction cards. During the past 
year the unusual demand for a popular half dozen novels 
has by no means equalled the call for the same number 
of most popular books of the year preceding. As guaged 
by the reserve postals, the following books stand first in 
popularity: 

Postals Postals 
Sold. Mailed. 

The Crisis 89 66 

Alice of Old Vincennes 82 78 

Bben Holden 80 71 

Heritage of Unrest 79 79 

Master Christian 58 62 

Helmet of Navarre 34 30 



422 386 

For the six most popular books of the preceding year 
1094 postals were sold and 1091 mailed. 

SCHOOL DEPARTM ENT. 

Volumes, December 1, 1900 6,319 

Volumes added 1,985 

Volumes discarded and lost 210 

Net gain , 1,775 

Total volumes, November 30, 1901 8,094 

Pictures December 1, 1900 869 

Pictures added 295 

Total pictures 1,164 

Books circulated 78,083 

Notices sent 457 



22 LOS ANGBUDB PUBLrIC LIBRAflY. 



The statement of Yolumeft gkwen above records the ac- 
tual number purchased from the school fund now In the 
library. The circulation of books to the schools Is by no 
means limited to these, the entire library being drawn 
upon by the teachers. The purchases in this department 
are almost entirely duplicates, the library fund proper being 
drawn upon for new books. While the accessions for the 
year are considerable, it should be noted that nearly all 
were receiyed during the summer and hare been in use 
in the schools but two months and a half. In spite of 
this fact the circulation has increased 16,845 over last year. 
Of the 545 teachers in the city, 371 are drawing regularly 
the twenty volumes a month allowed them, against 223 out 
of 518 last year. In addition, 58 teachers in private schools 
are availing themselves of the four volumes at a time al- 
lowed them under the rules. 

JUVENILE DEPARTMENT. 

Volumes December 1, 1900 7,311 

Volumes added, fiction 1,824 

Volumes added, classes 1,580 

Volumes lost and returned 4 

Volumes discarded 412 

Volumes lost and paid for 81 

Volumes unaccounted for 460 

Net gain 2.455 

Volumes November 30, 1901 9,766 

Books circulated, home 63,988 

Books circulated, library 30,624 94,612 

Notices sent 1,209 

Of the 9766 volumes in the Juvenile department, 564 
are reference and are included in the count given by the 
reference department, it not being feasible to make a sep- 
arate entry. The total number also ihcludes many of the 
books reported with the school department since they are 
shelved together and drawn upon equally. The use of non- 
fiction cards among the children is quite extensive in spite 
of the fact that fairy tales may not be drawn upon them, 
and it frequently happens that both cards are used for the 



REPORT OF THB LIBRARIAN. 23 



noDrflctlon books. Much help has come to the library from 
the opportunity afforded the principal of this department 
to address various Child Study Circles in the city on the 
subject of children's books and reading. Twenty circles 
have thus been visited and the effect upon the children's 
reading is noticeable. Much of the important work with 
children Is accomplished at the branches upon which com- 
ment is made elsewhere. 

MAIL AND MAGAZINES. 

Periodicals on file in the reading room: 

By gift 137 

By subscription 456 593 

Acknowledgements sent 364 

Magazine covers made 660 

Magazines covered 6,833 

Circulation, home: 

Bound magazines 6,210 

Unbound magazines 35,009 41,219 

Notices sent 638 

BRANCH AND DELIVERY STATIONS. 

A detailed statement of the work accomplished in each 
branch and delivery station is set forth in Appendix 7. 
The work of the branches is largely with children, though 
there is a growing use of books and magazines by adults. 
The Castalar Branch, located in the Settlements House, 
was discontinued November 1st, a steady decline in patron- 
age being the principal reason for the step. Macy Street 
Reading Room commenced to circulate books January 1st, 
thereby becoming a regular branch. The privilege of draw- 
ing books has been greatly appreciated. The average for 
the year was 131 a month, and it is steadily increasing. 
During May and June the branch was closed for some six 
weeks owing to the prevalence of smallpox In the neigh- 
borhood. A gift of eight framed pictures from the Civic 
League has made the reading room very attractive. This 
branch is now open each evening, except Sunday, from 
six to nine, the School Board continuing to famish room, 
lights and Janitor service. 



24 LOS ANGBL.E8 PUBLIC LIBRAJEIT. 



Central Avenue Branch was opened November 4Ui in 
a room rented, furnished and lighted by the citizens of 
that portion of the city. Some three hundred volumes are 
kept there permanently, with a small collection of maga- 
zines and papers, the last being donations. Deliveries from 
the main library are made twice a week, the service 
thereby combining the features of a regular delivery sta- 
tion with those of a branch. The record for the first month 
of 1298 readers and 477 books circulated for home use, is 
most encouraging. 

Four delivery stations are now in operation. Boyle 
Heights was eetablished last year^ Hoover Street was 
started in January, East Los Angeles In October and Pico 
Heights in November. The circulation of 634 books in No- 
vember, at an average cost of one and one-tenth cents a 
book seems to prove the wisdom of the plan. 

The loaning of books to the various fire stations of 
the city has continued during the year with evident satis- 
faction. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

The new edition of Novels and Tales commented upon 
in the last report was ready for distribution December 4th, 
1900. This is the first finding list printed since 1897, and 
h&B been greatly appreciated by our patrons. The Monthly 
Bulletin resumed publication after a lapse of eight years. 
The most important accessions are here recorded from 
month to month, together with bibliographies and reading 
lists upon timely and appropriate topics. 

A revision of the Rules and Regulations of the library 
was made in January, and printed copies were ready for 
distribution in March. The routine work of the library has 
been greatly facilitated thereby. 

ADMINISTRATION. 

The resignation of Miss Putnam on account of her ap- 
proaching marriage occurred in July. She has been a mem- 
ber of the staff for eight years and principal of the Juvenile 
department since 1898, where her peculiar qualification« and 



REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN. 25 



long experience made her most valuable. In September 
Miss Jacobus resigned to accept the position of librarian 
in the Kamehameha Schools of Hawaii. Her three and 
a half years' senrice to the library has been invaluable 
and her resignation is a distinct loss. 

Promotions for the year have been as follows: Miss 
Miller to second assistant librarian. Miss Clark to principal 
of the registry department, Miss Blanchard to principal of 
the Juvenile department. Miss Smith, Miss Morgan, Miss 
Fagge, Miss Dancaster and Miss Hindle to the day staff, 
and Miss Madison, Mrs. Jackson, Miss Witman, Miss White 
and Miss Andrews to the night staff. 

The thirteenth training class graduated in May with 
four members, three of whom are already on the staff, the 
fourth not being eligible. The fourteenth class commenced 
work November 4th. Owing to the fact that but one sub- 
stitute ifi waiting, the number of the present class was 
extended to eight. 

In February Miss Beckley was granted two weeks' 
leave of absence to assist in the Public Library of Santa 
Barbara, and in September Mise Stella Beckley was given 
a similar leave which will probably extend till spring. In 
November Miss Shepard was given a two-month's leave of 
absence to supply the position of cataloguer In. the Me- 
chanics' Institute of San Francisco. The difficulty of serv- 
ice in our present quarters is increasing day by day, and too 
much cannot be said in commendation of the staff in the 
faithful performance of their duties. 

To readers and the public generally is due the warmest 
appreciation of their patience and courtesy under the grow- 
ing inconvenience of our crowded condition. 

In conclusion, permit me to thank the Board of Direc- 
tors for the cordial support given me at all times in car- 
rying out the work of the library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dec. 6th, 1901. MARY L. JONES 

Libranan. 



26 L06 AMOBUDB PUBLIC LIBRART 



APPENDIXES. 
I, Memoranda, 
II. Officers and Employees of the Los Angeles Public 
Library y arranged ckronohgicaUy. 

III. Siaiisiics of Accessions. 

IV. Classified Statistics of Circulation. 
V. Home Circulation. 

VI. Comparison between Books and Circulation. 
VII. Circulation of Branches and Delivery Stations. 
VIII. Comparative Statement. 
IX. List of Periodicals. 
X. Donors to the Library. 



APPBNDIX I. 27 



1872 









«< 



MEMORANDA. 

Population ot Los Angeles, 10,000. 

Area ot Los Angeles, 17,172.37 acres. 

Assessed value of Los Angeles, $2,231,497.00 
Library established by public-spirited citizens. 
1872 First Board of Directors appointed. 
First Librarian appointed. 
Library located in Downey Block. 
Annual fee, |6.^0. 
1878 Special act of Legislature enabling the City of Los 
Angeles to apportion money for maintaining Public 
Library. 
1889 New City Charter, Board appointed by Mayor. 

Library removed from Downey Block to City Hall. 
Volumes when moved, 6,666. 
Annual fee, |4.00. 
** Library re-classifled by Decimal Classification. 

1891 Library made free. 

'* Training Class established. 

1892 School Libraries deposited with the Public Library. 
1897 Library reorganized to "open access." 

" First bequest (Dr. Wm. A. Edgar). 

" First subscription to new building (J. H. Jones). 

" Castalar Reading Room and delivery station opened. 

1899 Macy Street Reading Room opened. 

1900 Boyle Heights delivery station established. 
" Firemen'^8 libraries started. 

1901 Hoover Street, Bast Los Angeles and Pico Heights 

Stations established. 
" Central Avenue Branch established. 
" Circulation, Home, 472,643. 
Circulation, Library, 191,296. 
C Population of Los Angeles, 120,000 

1901 ) Area of Los Angeles, 27,696.49 acres. 
( Assessed value, 170,343,977.00 



28 APPENDIX n. 



OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE LOS ANQELES 
PUBLIC LIBRARY ARRANGED CHRONOLOGICALLY. 



FIRST BOARD OF DIRECTORS, APPOIMTBD DSC. 1872. 

J. G. Downey, President Harris Newxnark. 

S. B. CaswelL T. Sepulveda. 

H. K. W. Bent. W. H. Mace. 

Col. Geo. H. Smith. A. W. Potts. 

Gen. Geo. Stoneman. T. W. Temple. 

W. B. Lawler. R. H. Dalton. 

DIRECTORS 1889-1901. 

Dobinson, G. A. 1889-1896 

Howard, P. H 1889-1896 

Hanchette, H. Jay 1889-1891 

Jones, B. W 1889-1891 

Davies, J. M 1889-1893 

Severance, Mrs^ C. M 1891-1898 

Smith, Col. Geo. H 1891-189S 

Borden, Sheldon 1898-1896 

Hamilton, W. J 1893-1896 

Spalding, W. A, 1893-1896 

Bonebrake, Geo. H. 1896-1897 

Flint P. P 1896-1897 

O'Melveny, H. W 1896-1897; 1899-1901 

Stewart, Geo. H 1896-1897 

Storre. H. B 1896-1897 

Dockweiler, Isidore B 1897-1899; 1901-.... 

Burbank, W. P 1897-1899 

Poster, Bmest K. 1897-1899 

Garland, W. M 1897-1899 

Rogers, Barl 1897-1899 

Rule, P. K. 1899-1901 

Mathews, W. B 1899-1901 

Newmark, M. J 1899-1901 

Thomas, P. J 1899-1901 

Clark, J. Ross Jan., 1901 

Dockweiler, Isidore B. ...April, 1901 

Bdelman, D. W April, 1901 

Phillips, Lee A April, 1901 

Trueworthy, J. W April, 1901 



APPSNDIX IL 29 



UBRARIANS. 

Lilttlefleld, J. C Dec., 1872-JaiL, 1879 

Connolly, P. Jan., 1879-June, 1880 

Foy, Mary B June, 1880-Jan., 1884 

QaYltt JesBle A. Jan., 1884-Jan., 1889 

Prescott, Lydla A Jan., 1889-Apr., 1889 

Kelso, Tessa L. Apr., 1889-May, 1896 

Fowler, Clara B May» 189&>Jiine, 1897 

Wadleigh, Harriet CUld June, 1897-May, 1900 

Jones, Mary L. May, 1900 

ASSISTANT UBRARIANS. 

Gavitt, Jessie A. Apr., 1889-Feb., 1890 

Marquis, Barton H May, 1889-Sept., 1889 

Basse, Adelaide R Feb., 1890-May, 1895 

Fenner, Lena B Apr., 1890-June, 1893 

Austin, Anna D Apr., 1896-8ept, 1898 

Oleason, Celia July, 1897 

Jones, Mary L Feb., 1899-May, 1900 

Miller, Nora A July 1901 

ATTENDANTS. 

Haines, Bstelle Sept., 1889-May, 1896 

Hasse, Adelaide R. ..Sept, 1889-Feb., 1890 
Wellman, Bva A. ....Sept, 1889-Jnne, 1891 

Fenner, Lena B Sept., 1889-Apr., 1890 

Gleason, Celia Dec., 1889- July, 1897 

Longstreet Mamie P.. Dec, 1889-Apr., 1890 

Bumiller, Bmma Jan., 189(K-Mar., 1890 

Rubs, Nellie M. Feb., 1890-Jan., 1898 

Beyllle, Blanche Aug., 1890-Oct, 1893 

Clarke, M. B Aug^ 1890-Noy., 1890 

Avery, Zora Not., 1890^Deo., 1890 

Fargo, Elizabeth Not., 1890-Sept., 1899 

Kimball, Helen L. ...Nor., 1890-dept, 1898 

Logan, Margaret Apr., 1891-Oct., 1893 

Walker, Stella May, 1891-Not., 1894 

Hendricks, Ida May, 1891-Sept, 1891 

^Wise, Corinne June, 1891-June, 1898 



30 LOS ANQELSB PUBLIC LIBBAST. 



Tedford, Martha Sept., 1891-July, 1896 

KlngBley, Cordelia May, 1892-Au«r., 1896 

Mercer, Harriet May., 1892-Apr., 1897 

Pierce, Bertha E May, 1892-July, 1896 

Miller, Nora A Aug., 1892-June, 1901 

Thomburg, Florence. .Aug., 1892 

Austin, Anna D Aug., 1892-Apr., 1895 

Darlow, Gertrude B. ..July, 1893 

NeYln, Helen A July, 1893 

Putnam, Blanche A. ..July, 1893-July, 1901 
Beckley, Anna McC. ..Aug., 1893 

Johnson, Mary A Nov., 1893 

Dunn, Mabel S Mar., 1894 

Moore, Bdith A. Sept, 1894-Noy., 1900 

Gleason, Pearl E Sept, 1894 

Horgan, Georgia M. ..Oct, 1894 

Barl, Anna Dec, 1894^an., 1896 

Hand, Mabelle June, 1895-Not., 1898 

Prentiss, Mabel Oct., 1895-Apr., 1898 

Bennett, Mamie May, 1896 

Blanchard, Mae D. ..July, 1896 

Clark, Christine Aug., 1896 

Toung, Jessie M Sept., 1896-July, 1899 

Reach, May B Mar., 1897 

Eberhart, Rose May, 1897 

Benz, Bessie L. Apr., 1898^iine, 1900 

Saxton, Gertrude Apr., 18984iept., 1899 

Jacobus, Sarah M. ..Apr., 1898-Sept., 1901 

Mason, Dora L May, 1898 

Nisbet, Frances P May, 1898 

Long, Anna M June, 1898-June, 1900 

Kane, Bertha B June, 1898 

Smith, Bell Apr., 1899 

Morgan, Ella S Apr., 1899 

Whedon, Maud Apr., 1899-Feb., 1900 

Fagge, Ethel wyn H. ..Apr., 1899 
Dancaster, Josephine Sept., 1899 

Hindle, Clara Sept., 1899 

Ellis, Victoria Sept, 1899 



APPBNBIX n. 31 



Munson, Ida G Feb., 1900 

Melzer, Margaret P. .June, 1900 

Beckley, Stella July, 1900 

Sheimrd, Jane L Nov., 1900 

Madison, Anna Apr., 1901 

Jackson, Bmilie June, 1901 

Witman, Julia Aug., 1901 

White, Grace M Aug., 1901 

Andrews, Jesselyn ....Oct., 1901 



32 



APPENDIX III. 



STATISTICS OF ACCESSIONS. 



3 

U 


18 

0) 


er.. 1, 1900 


1 ^ 

3 > 

6 O 


1H 


» 

1 

< 


1^- 


8£ g 






P^O 


P » 


< 


1 


n )4K 






Circ. 


Ref. 


Circ. 


Ref. 


circ. 

7 
126 


Ref. 

62 
2 


Circ. 


Ref. 


Circ. 


Ref. 

302 

25 




000 


602 
970 


240 

23 


609 
1039 


911 


100 


51 




6 




1064 


200. 


2427 


232 


79 




184 


5 


6 




2526 


237 


2763 


300 


2868 


420 


140 


592 


44 


29 




3291 


464 


3755 


400 


552 


157 


49 




472 


10 


3 




972 


167 


1139 


500 


2238 


417 


106 




428 


69 


8 




2552 


486 


3038 


600 


1291 


197 


96 




210 


82 


8 




1397 


279 


1676 


700 


1027 


274 


72 




169 


32 


8 




1116 


306 


1422 


800 


4574 


662 


392 




616 


88 


44 




4754 


750 


5.S04 


900 


2937 


384 


128 




505 


61 


21 




3293 


445 


3738 


910 


2829 


495 


102 




363 


55 


26 




3064 


550 


3614 


920 


2142 


232 


61 




259 


59 


12 




2328 


291 


2619 


French 


928 




31 




47 




7 




937 


«•••••»• 


937 


German 


476 




24 




11 




4 


•••••» 


459 




459 


Italian .. 


295 




22 




11 




2 




282 




282 


Spanish 
Music... 


451 


198 


66 




204 




10 




579 


198 


777 


951 


• ■•••• • 


53 




61 




6 




9,S3 


• •• • • ••* 


953 


Juv.Fic. 


3090 

11866 

1139 








1824 

2180 

188 


"sss 


323 

759 

36 




4591 

13287 

1239 


**S326 


4591 


Fiction.. 








13287 


Bd.Mgs. 


4471 


52 




6,S65 


Doc's*... 




7593 








668 
2092 








8261 


8261 






1524 




8457 


1318 








Totals... 


43653 


15995 


49268 


18067 


67355 



Books lost and paid for returned 22 

Books lost by binding accessioned pamphlets, etc., 

together '. 23 

Total based on accession record 67706 

Pamphlets, pictures and parts of volumes accessioned but 

no longer counted as books 351 

Total 67355 



APPENDIX IV. 



33 



CLASSIFIED STATISTICS OF CIRCULATION. 
HOME AND LIBRARY. 



Class 



000 ~ 

100 ~ 

200 

300 

400 

500 

600 

700. 

800.. 

900 

910. 

920 

French 

German 

Italian. 

Spanish 

Masic 

Juvenile Fiction... 

Fiction 

Bound Magazines. 

Magazines 

Docaments.. 

Unclassified ) 
Juvenile J 



Totals. 



Net gain.... 



1899-00 



20468 

7749 

12041 

21748 

18198 

23295 

14692 

14612 

37979 

22273 

23079 

14200 

3638 

1846 

5% 

2543 

3662 

51286 

205443 

24378 

•62477 

2853 

t20582 



609638 



1900-01 






18780 

8664 

13059 

27218 

20106 

28864 

17484 

17029 

43650 

27588 

30139 

18630 

4484 

3141 

585 

3744 

4874 

77465 

221376 

30405 

43901 

2651 



663839 



Gain 



915 
1018 
5470 
1910 
5569 
2792 
2417 
5671 
5315 
7060 
4430 

846 
1295 

1201 

1212 

26179 

15933 

6027 



Loss 



1688 



95260 
54201 



11 



♦18576 

202 

20582 



41059 



Per Cent, of 
Circnlatioa 



2.82 
1.31 
1.81 
4.10 
3.02 
4.40 
2.63 
2.56 
6.57 
4.32 

4.54 

• 

4.15 

.67 

.47 

.09 

.56 

.72 

11.65 

33.33 

4.27 

6.46 

.39 



100.00 



* Inclndes 7 months, Reading Room count no Ioniser reported. 

* Clasaified In 1900-1901. 



i 


4,742 
5,563 
5,263 
S,88S 
6,318 
5,660 
5,159 
5,118 
5,041 
4,412 
6,423 
9,196 


1 


1 


15,731 
18,606 
16,986 
18,158 
17,949 
17,332 
17,202 
18,854 
18,876 
17,272 
19,462 
19,658 


1 


1 
1 


el N N r» <^" n n n n n * V 


3 


i 


2 S 3 i S ? E g E 1 8 1 


1 


11 


6,760 
5,622 
5,243 
5,916 
7,175 
6,262 
4,501 
2,342 
1,876 
5,100 
9,781 
7,959 


2 

s 



APPENDIX VI. 



35 



^OnPARATIV^ STATEHENT OP BOOKS 



Class 


Books for 
Circulation 


Per Cent, 
by Class 


II 

8* 


Per Cent, 
by Class. 


Ratio 




000 


609 

1039 

2526 

3291 

972 

2552 

1397 

1116 

4754 

3293 

3064 

2328 

937 

459 

282 

579 

953 

4591 

13287 

1239 


1.23 
2.10 
5.12 
6.68 
1.% 
5.18 
3.36 
2.26 
9.58 
6.7 
6.22 
4.73 
1.89 
.92 
.57 
1.17 
1.92 
9.25 
27.11 
2.51 


260 
5605 
5824 

14340 
6311 

16556 
5854 
5317 

25179 

16320 

15869 
8787 
3729 
2345 
414 
3137 
4234 

66259 

216086 

9591 

40526 


.05 

1.18 

1.23 

3.03 

1.12 

3.50 

1.23 

1.12 

5.32 

3.45 

3.36 

1.85 

.78 

.49 

.087 

.66 

.89 

14.33 

45.72 

2.02 

8.59 


.041 
.561 
.240 
.453 
.571 
.675 
.366 
.495 
.555 
.516 

.406 
.413 
.534 
.152 
.564 
.463 
1.549 
1.686 
.805 


.028 


1 

100 


. < > 
.556 


200 


.210 


300 


.452 


400 


.748 


500 


.647 


600 


.368 


700 


.457 


800 


.500 


900 


.512 


910 


.510 


920 


415 


French 


.389 


German 


.354 


Italian 


.205 


Bpaniflh .............. 


.5% 


Music 


.403 


Juvenile Fiction.. 
Fiction 


1.940 
2.050 


Bound Magazines . 
Unbound Mag'z's. 


.720 










XOuMl ••••••••••••••• 


49268 




472543 


100. 00 1 







The Ideal percentage ratio is unity. Below unity Indicates that the 
supply exceeds the demand. aboTe, that the demand exceeds the supply. 
See A. L. A. Proceedings, 1900, pp. 79-S2, 



APPENDIX Vn. 



BRANCHES AND DELIVERY STATIONS 








I>«.lj«..|Feb 


Mar. 


Ap. 


M. 


]Bd 


iBl 


A. 


^ 


Oct 


Not. 


TofI 


At. 


Home... 


1 


81 


1 



109 


871 
115 


96 

25 


475 
123 


500 
187 


380 345 
181154 


868 

178 


1003 
185 


B922 
1437 


131 


Gutelar 
Home... 


146 


96 


68 


85 


73 


86 


91 


65 


73 


69 


52 


Cl'ad 


921 


64 


Central 
Avenne 
B. R.... 

Home... 




1298 
477 


1298 
477 


477 


K.... 


891 90l83 


84 
•6 


91 


90 


■ 


76 


65 


106 


113 


188 


1143 


95 




81 


73 


. 


49 


55 


ao 


69 


99 


892 


81 


E.Lm 
Asgdea 






Of 




d U 


)cto 


ber 


1. 


149 


231 


380 


190 



Fir»- 



80 68 50 48 50 27 49 64 53 36 66 78 669 56 







472,543 
392,022 
358,898 
402,924 
380,494 
388,756 
371,638 
329,405 
267,054 
233,363 
116,189 
48,304 
6,268 




ill 


67,355 
60,000 
51,334 
49,847 
48,145 
44,564 
41,600 
40,152 
34,332 
29,389 
25,140 
17,925 
11,028 


i 

I 
i 


III 


lllllll 




1 


116,233 28 
14,795 38 
13,854 02 
12,636 20 
11.949 69 
10,999 59 
10,948 47 
10,521 63 
10,199 51 
8,972 35 
7,454 40 
5.676 83 
2,632 08 


< 

> 

i 

1 


1. 

i 

s. 


<13,522 72 
10,326 41 
6,924 42 
6,609 35 
7,862 87 
7,195 05 
2,900 28 
6,883 49 
7,888 14 
7,962 78 
8,339 49 
12,220 27 
3,540 89 


e888r8SS!388S 

3 2 t R 1 3 I 1 S \ 1 ^ 

1 
i 


■8 

s 
1 



38 



APPENDIX IX. 



LIST OF PERIODICALS. 



* Oopiw Circulate. 
li Donation* 
t Parttal File 
X File Complete. 



DAILY. 



HtAlaskan. ; 

tAiizona Republican. 

tAUanta Constitution. 

tBoston TranBcript. 

tChicaffo Record-Herald. 

fChicaflfo Tribjune. 

tdncioDAti Post. 
UfColorado T^le^rraph. 
iltCOn^rressional Record. 

B Denver Post 

fDenver Republican. 

|]La Re vista de Merida. 
lltLos Anffsles Express. 
KfLiOS Anffsles Herald. 
UfLos Angeles Journal. 
OtLos Angeles Record. 
Utlios Angeles Times. 

fMinneapolis Times. 
HtMontana Record. 

fNew Orleans. Picayune. 

|Ne:Rr Yotk Dalljr People. 

tNew York Tribune. 



II Oakland Bnauirer. 
|]tOakl«Lnd Tribune. 

tOmaha Be«. 

tPbiladelphla Times. 

tPortland Oregonlan. 
RtRiverslde Enterprise. 

II Sacramento Bee. 
JltSUicram^tq Record-Union. 

tSt. Louis Republic. 

tSalt Lake Tribune. 

tSan Bernardino Times-In- 
dex. 

II San Diego Tribune. 

liSan Diego Union. 

tSan Francisco Bulletin. 

tSan Francisco OslL 

tSan Francisco Chronicle. 

tSan Francisco Examiner. 

II San XjuIs Obispo Breese. 

IITacoma Ledger. 

IjTombstone Prospector. 



WEEKLY. 



tAcademy. 
tl Acton Rooster. 
DAlhambra Advocate. 
tAmerioan Architects and 

Building News, Intemat. 

ed. 
UAmerican Act Journal. 
tAmerlcan Bee Journal. 



tAmerlcan Gardening. 
IIAnaheim Gasette. 
iJAppeal to Reason. 
*t Argonaut. 

tArmy and Navy Journal. 
tArmy and Nav«a Register. 
$ Athenaeum. 
II California Courier. 



APPBNDIX IX. 



3$ 



fltCalifonlia Cultivator. 
lltCalifornla Independent. 
Iltcapital. 

flOatalina Clipper. 
HtChallen^e. 

tCharitlea. 
lltChrlstlan Science Sentinel. 

IDer Cbriitliche Apolo^ete. 
QtCitroffraph. 

tColller'8 Weekly. 

nColton Chronicle. 

ttColton Nfew». 
HtCommerclal Bulletin. 

tCommoner. 
lltConBerva/tlve. 

tDramatic Mirror. 
BtDun's Review. 
BtEl Figaro Habana. 

tiaectrical World. 

tBlectrician. 

DtBH Monitor Mexicana. 

HtEl ProRreso. 

tEnglneerlng and Mining 
Journal. 

tEnglneerlng News. 

IIEscondldo llmea. 

tFarm, Field, and Fireside. 

DFlaming S^ord. 

tFliegende Blatter. 

IIFlorence Tribune. 

BForward Movement Herald. 
DtOermania. 

llOuide, Freano. 
^tHarper'fl Weekly. 

tHoaxd'a Dairyman. 

llHueneme Herald. 

Rlmperial Pren and Farmer. 

tindependent. 

tJournal of Education. 

^Journal of Education, 
judge. 
DtL'Unlon Nouxelle. 
OtLas Dos R^publioas. 
•tLeslle'fl Weeklv. 



tLife. 

tLiiter£Lry IMgest 

tirlterature. 
stutters Living Age. 

!i Lodge BXihoes. 

tLondon Ora|>mc. 

tLondon Illustrated News. 

tLondon Times. 

IJLos Angeles Hotel G^Ubette. 
UtLos Angeles Mining Review. 

UMadeni Times. 

IIMarion County Enterprise. 
lltMlnlng and Metallurgy. 

tMlning and Scientific Press. 

tMuslcal Courier. 

^Nation. 

liNational City Record. 

fNature. 

11 New Century. 

tNew York Saturday Review 
(N. Y. Times). 

tNotes and Queries. 
lltOll, Copper and Finance. 

llOntarlo Record. 

tOutlook. 
UtPaclfic Fruit World. 

t^aclflc Rural Press. 

IJPaciflfi Weekly Tribune. 

tPaso Robles Independent 
lltPatent Office Gazette. 

II Pomona Progress. 

llPomona Review. 

llPress and Horticulturist. 

tPubllc Opinion. 
tPubllsher's Weekly. 

tPunch. 

Puck. 

*Queen. 

tRailroad Gazette. 

IIRailroad Record. 

II Real Estate News. 

HRedondo Breeze. 
lltSan Francisco Star. 

tSanitary Record. 



40 



APPBNDIX IX. 



ISan Pedro News. 

I Santa Monica Outlook. 

tSaturday Evening Post. 
iltSaturday Post. 

ISaturday Review. 
*tSchool Journal. 

tScience. 

tScientific American. 

tScientiflc American Sup- 
plement. 

llSentlnel of Liberty. 

tSpectator. 

tSphere. 

tSprin^eld Republican. 

t Street Railway Journal. 



UtSud Oalifornia Post. 

USutter Independent. 

UTempleton Advance. 

IITidingB. 

tToronto Qlobe. 

ITulare Weekly Register. 

tUeber Land und Meer. 

HUnion Signal. 
DtVestkusten. 

BWest End News. 
iltWesem Grajobic. 
lltWestem Miner and Finan- 
cier. 

II Woman' 8 Journal. 

tYouth's Companion. 



BI-WEEKLY. 



tDial. 

tDie Qartenlaube. 

IIEquity. 

tCkmleningi. 



tintelligence. 

^tRevue dee Deux Mondes. 
llZion's Watch Tower. 



MONTHLY. 



IIAcetylene GkLS Journal. 

tAmerican Electrician. 

tAmerican Journal Medical 
Science. 

tAmerican Journal of Science. 
^tAmerican Monthly. 

lAmerioan Naturalist. 

tAmerican Poultry Journal. 
^tAmerican Primary Teacher. 
^tAmerican School Board 

Journal. 
*tA.rena. 

tArt Amateur. 

tArt Journal. 

tAstro-Physical Magazine. 
nAUantic. 



*tBabyhood. 

tBadmlnton. 

tBanker's Magazine. 

UBeet Sugar Gazette. 

tBimetallist 
•tBlrds. 

tBlackwood's. 

tBookbuyer. 

tBookman. 
lit Book Reviews. 

tBookeeller. 

tBrochure Series. 
lltBureau of American Repub- 
lics. 

tBusineas. 

tCalifomia Municipalities. 



APPENDIX IX. 



41 



OCanada Stamp Sheet and 

tOasBier's Magazine. 
*|Catholic World. 
•tOentury. 
IChamber'8 Journal. 
^tChautauQuan. 
•tC?hild Garden. 
•tChild Study. 

tChiistian Science Journal. 

tOlub Wom&n. 

tComxnonfl. 
lltConsular ReportSb 

^Contemporary Review. 

tCornhlU Magazine. 
^tCosmopolitan. 

tCrltlc. 

^Cumulative Index. 

tCurrent Hlatory. 
•^Current L»iterajture. 

•Delineator. 
•JBclectic. 
*t£ducatlon. 

*t£iducational Foundations. 
•^Educational Review. 

tEnglneerlngr Magazine. 
BtEngineer*s Review. 

•Etude. 

tFanciers Monthly. 

tFlgraro Illustrfi. 

llBHnance. 

tFortnlghtly Review. 
•tB'orum. 
lltPratemlty. 

JGeographlcal Journal. 

tGeological Magazine. 

tGolfer. 

*tGood Health. 
^tGood Houaekeepinir. 

Iiaood Roads Magazine. 
•tHarper'a. 
•tHarper'a Bazar. 

IIHaus und Herd. 

llHerald of the Golden Age. 



11 Home Crusade. 

tHouse Beautiful. 

timpressions. 

tinland Printer. 

tintemational Monthly. 

^International Studio. 

flrrigation Aire. 

JlJapan Tribune. 

tJournal of Botany. 

tJournal of Electricity, 
Power and Gas. 

tJournal of Franklin Insti- 
tute. 

tKeramic Studio. 
•^Kindergarten Magazine. 
•fKlndergarten Review. 

tKnowledge. 

Ladles Home Journal. 

lILadies of Maccabees. 
lltLand of Sunshine. 
lltLaw Notes. 
IJtLand of Sunshine. 
lltLflberty Review. 
•ILilbrary Journal. 
•JLlpplncott. 

II Literary News. 

tLiterary World. 
•ILlttle Folks. 

tMacmillan's Magazine. 
•tMcClure. 

^Magazine of Art. 

tMeehan's Monthly. 

(Missionary Review. 
•fModern Methods. 

tModern Mexico. 

tMoney. 

tMunicipal Engineering. 

fMuniclpal Journal and En- 
gineer. 

tMuslc. 

tNational Builder. 

tNational Review. 
National Single Taxer. 

tNautilus. 



42 



APPENDIX IX. 



♦tNew Engrland. 

tNineteenth Century. 
♦tNormal Instructor. 
•JNorth American Review. 

tOpen Court, 
•touting. 
•tOverland. 

II Pacific Health Journal. 

II Pacific Lfumber Trade Jour- 
nal. 

II Pad fie Unitarian. 

tPall Mall Magazine. 

UParadise of the Pacific. 
lltPet Stock Tribune. 

II Philatelic Advocate. 

tPhotographic Times. 

tPhysical Review. 
♦tPopular Educator. 
•tPopular Science Monthly. 
•tPrimary Education. 
•tPrimary School Journal. 

tProgresB. 
•JPublic Libraries. 
•tRecreation. 
•^Review of Reviews. 

tRural Califomian. 
nst. Nicholas. 

tSanltarian. 
*tSchool and Home. 
•tSchool Review. 

tScientiflc American Builders' 
Edition. 



•tScribner's Magazine. 

•Short Stories. 

II Social Forum, 
lit Sound Currency. 

llSound Money. 
lltSouthem California Prac- 
titioner. 

II Southwest Ofllcial Guide. 

llStar of Truth. 

tSugar Beet 
•tTeacher's Institute. 
•tTeacher's World, 

tTelephone Magazine. 

tTheosophlcal Review. 

tTbrreya. 

tTraveller. 

IITraveller's Record. 
Truth. 
U. S. Official Postal Guide. 

tUnlversal Brotherhood Path, 
lit University of California. 

tVegetarian. 

||W£Lshington News Letter. 
Water and Forest. 

tWest American Mollusca. 

tWest American Scientist. 
•tWestem Journal of Educa- 
tion. 

^Westminster Review. 

IJWhittier Boys and Girls. 

11 World's Work. 

tZoe. 



BI-MONTHLY. 



tAmerican AntlQuarian. 
tAmerican Journal of Social- 

ogy. 
tAmerican Law Review. 
tAnn&ls of the American 

Academy of Political and 

Social Science. 



lltABsociation Review. 
tCondor 
llDominion. 
tUnlversity Chronicle. 



APPENDIX IX. 



43 



QUARTERLY. 



tAjnerican Anthropologist. 

tAmerican Historical Re- 
view. 

^American Journal of Ar- 
chaeology. 

tAuk. 

tBulIetlns American Qeog- 
raphlcal Society. 

^Economic Journal. 

^Edinburgh Hevlew. 

{International Journal of 
Ethics. 

tJohns Hopkins University 
Studies. 

tJoumal American Folklore. 

tJournal of Political Econ- 
omy. 
Library. 



tMind. 

tMonist. 

tMunlclpal Affairs. 

t:Oread. 

{Palestine Exploration Fund. 

tPoet L<ore. 

{Political Science Quarterly. « 

tProceedings Academy Nat- 
ural Science. 

{Publications American Eco- 
nomic Association. 

t Publications American Sta- 
tistical Association. 

{Quarterly Journal of Bcono- 
mlcs. 

{Quarterly Review. 

{Yale Review. 



SEMI-QUARTERLY. 

tJournal of Geology. 



TRI-ANNUAL. 

•{Pedagogical Seminary. 



SEfll-ANNUAL. 

tBralthwaites Retrospect. 



44 



APPENDIX X. 



LIST OF DONORS. 



Abrams. Albert. 
^ Aberdeen Public Librafjr. 

Adams, Mar^r Still. 

Adriance MemorleCl Lilbrary. 

A^ruilar Free Library. 

Alameda Public Lfibrary. 

American Electrician Co. 

Amherst College. 

Apprentices' Lilbrary Com- 
pany, Philadelphia* 

Archer, Ruby. 

Armour Institute of Tech- 
nolo£^. 

AuGEtralasia, Library Associa- 
tion of 

Averill, Kra^ AJnna S., Jjob 
Angeles. 

Baker. Miss, Los Angeles. 

Baker, Gertrude A., Cleveland. 

Balch, Thomas Willing', Phil- 
adelphia. 

Bangor Public Library. 

Battersea Public L/ibrariefl, 
London. 

Belmont School, CaL 

Bemis, Edward W., Cleveland. 

Bennett College, Chicago. 

Berry, John N., Millbury, 
Mass. 

Blrmin«rham Central Free 
Libraries, England. 

Blue Anchor Society, N. Y. 

Bluett, W. C., Los Angeles. 

Bootle Free Library and Mu- 
seum, England. 

Borton, Dr. F. S., Puebla, 
Mexico. 



Boston Book Co. 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts. 

Boston Port and Seamens 
Aid Society. 

Boston Public Library. 

Bowdoin College. 

Breen, H., Los Angeles. 

Bridgeport Public Library, 
Conn. 

Bronson Library Fund, 
Waterbury, Oonn. 

Brookline Public Baths. 

Brookline Public Library. 

Brooks, J. Marlon, Los An- 
geles. 

Brown, Col. Oarl, Massilon* 
O. 

Brown University, Provi- 
dence, R* L 

Bryn Mawr College. 

Buffalo Public Library. 

Burbank, W. F., Los Angeles. 

Burdick, Arthur J., Los An- 
geles. 

California Academy of Scien- 
ces. 

California, Controller's De- 
partment. 

California State Library. 

California State Mining- Bu- 
reau. 

California, University of 

Cambridge Public Library. 

Cardiff Free Libraries, Wales. 

Oamegle Institute, Pittsburg. 

Carnegie Library, Atianta* 
Oa. 



APPEINDIX X. 



45 



Oamegie Ltlbrary of Pitts- 
burg. 

Carter, Chas. F., Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Cassard, Mrs. G., LiOb Angeles. 

Centre College, Ky. 

Chandler, Alice Q., LAncacter, 
MaAS. 

Chicago Municipal Ldbrary 
and Bureau of Statistics. 

Chicago Public Library. 

Chicago, University of 

Church, S. R.. San Francisco. 

Cincinnati Museum Associa- 
tion. 

Cincinnati Public Ubrary. 

Clark, Mrs. Jonas Oilman, 
Worcester, Mass. 

Cleveland Public Library. 

Colorado, University of 

Columbia University. 

Columbian University. 

Commonwealth Co. 

Concord Free Ldbrary. 

Congressional Library. 

Oo-Operative Publishing Co. 

Council Bluffs Free Public 
Library. 

Oroydon Public Libraries, 
£ng. 

Dartmouth College. 

Dayton Public Library. 

Detroit Board of SMucatlon. 

Detroit Public Library. 

Dobinson, Q. A., Los An- 
geles. 

Dow, Joy Wheeler, Wyoming, 

N. J. 
Drolsum, A. C, Norway. 

Dundee Free Libraries, Scot- 
land. 

Bdwards, C A., Santa Bar- 
bara. 



Eldredge, Zoeth S., Saa 

Francisco. 
ESnoch Pratt SYee Library, 

Baltimore. 
Erie Public Library, Pa. 
Field, Marshall, Chicago. 
Field Columbian Museum, 

Chicago. 
Fits Public Library, Chelsea, 

Mass. 
Forbes Library, Northamp- 
ton, Mass. 
Frelherrlich Carl von Roths- 

chlld'sche ofEenliche BibUo- 

thek. 
Friends' Book Association, 

Philadelphia. 
Friends' Free Library, Oer- 

mantown. Pa. 
Garvey, Forbes, Los Angeles. 
GloversviUe Free Library, 

N. Y. 
Grand Rapids Public Library, 

Mich. 
Green, James, Worcester, 

Mass. 
Green, Samuel S., Worcester, 

Mass. 
Griffin, Dr. E. M. Los An- 
geles. 
Hartford Public Library. 
Harvard University. 
HaverlU Public Library, 

Mass. 
Healdsburg College, Cal. 
Heath, D. C. & Co., Boston. 
Helena Public Library, Mont. 
Hershey, Miss Mlra, Los 
Angeles. 

Hewett, Alfred, Toronto, Can- 
ada. 
Hoboken Free Public Library. 



46 



LOS ANGBLBB PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Idaho, Univeraity of 
Illinois, University of 
Indian Ri^rhta Association, 

Philadelphia. 
Iowa. Masonic L4brary, Cedar 

Rapld& 
Iowa State Library. 
Iowa State Normal School, 

CTedar Falls. 
Irving: Institute. San Pran- 

ClBCO. 

Jacobus, S. M., Los Angeles. 

Jersey City Free Public 
Library. 

Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore. 

Kansas, University of 

Keeney, Mrs. S. A., Cliy. 

Kongrl, Unlversitets, Upsala, 
Sweden. 

Lafayette Colleire. Fenn. 

Lake Placid Club, N. T. 

Lampadius, Malvina Doris, 
Los Angeles. 

Lawrence Public Library, 
Mass. 

Leland Stanford. Jr. Univer- 
sity. 

Library Bureau, Chicago. 

Lick Observatory. 

Llvermore, Chas. W., Pasa- 
dena. 

Liverpool Public Libraries, 
Museum and Art Gallery. 

Loe Angeles Board of Trade. 

Los Angeles County Auditor. 

Loe Angeles Health Depart- 
ment. 

Ludwlg Salvator, Archduke of 
Austria. 

Lynn Public Library, Mass. 

Mabie, A. S., San Francisco. 

McGowan, Anna, Los Angeles. 



McLellan, Geo. F., Los An* 
geles. 

McLellan, Mary E., Los An- 
geles. 

Madison Public Schools, Wis. 

Maiden Public Library, Mass. 

Manchester Public Free 
Libraries, Eng. 

Manchester Board of Heaith, 
N. H. 

Manhattan and the Bronx 
School Board, 

Marshfield Free Library. 

Martin, J. H., Los Angeles. 

Maryland, Unlversltv of 

Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Massachusetts Society Sons 
of American Revolution. 

Mayor, John E. B.. Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Mechanics Institute, San 
Francisco. 

Mercantile Library, N. Y. 

Mercantile Library, PhUadel- 
phla. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
N. Y. 

Michigan, University of 

Milwaukee Public Library. 

Milwaukee Public Schools. 

Minneapolis, City of 

Minneapolis Public Library 

Minnesota Historical Society. 
St. Paul. 

Missouri Botanical Garden. 

Missouri, University of 

Montclair Free Public Library 

N. J. 

Morris,, Jos., Los Angeles. 

Mt. Tamalpals Military Acad- 
emy. 

Munk, Dr. J. A., Los Angeles. 



APPENDIX X. 



47 



Murphy, Mrs. W. W., Los An- 
geles. 
Murray, Thomas Hamilton. 
Murrell, £d, Los Angreles. 
Nashua Public L#ibrary, N. H. 
National Educational Assn. 
Naval Intellisrence, Office of 
National Academy of Design. 
National Electric lAght Assn., 

N. y. 

Newark Free Public Library. 
Nebraska, University of 
New Bedford Free Public 

Library. 
New Britain Institute 

Library, Conn. 
New Haven Free Public 

Library. 
New Jersey Bureau of Statis- 

Ues. 
Newton Free Library, Mass. 
New York Bureau of L«abor 

Statistics. 
New York City Department 

of Education. 
"New York Farmers," N. Y. 
New York Free Circulating 

Library. 
New York General Society of 

Mechanics and Tradesmen. 
New York Public Library, 
New York State Charities 

Aid Ajun. 
New York State Library. 
New York Young Men's 

Christian Association. 
New Zealand Weekly Press. 
Ogilvie, J. S. Co., N. Y. 
Ohio Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tics. 
Ohio State University. 
Omaha Public Library. 
O'Neil, Desmond, Boston, 

Mass. 



Oregon. University of 

Osterhout Free Library, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Palmer, S. R., Los Angeles. 

Pasadena Public Library. 

Paterson Free Public Library, 
N. J. 

Peace Association of Friends, 
Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania College of Den- 
tal Surgery. 

Pennsylvania, University of 

Peoria Public Library. 

Philadelphia City Institute. 

Philadelphia Free Library. 

Philadelphia Times. 

Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass. 

Pomona College. 

Portland, Library Associa- 
tion, Oregon. 

Portland Public Library, Me. 

Pratt Institute Free Library, 
Brooklyn. 

Princeton University. 

Providence Libraries. 

Providence Public Library. 

Province Library, Victoria, 
B. C. 

Quincy, Mass., Public Schools. 

Reading Public Library. 

Rochdale Free Public Library, 
Eng. 

Rule, F. K., Los Angeles. 

Ruskin Art Club, Los Angeles. 

St. Bride Foundation. Lon- 
don. 

St. Joseph Free Public 
Library. 

St. Louis Board of Eiducation. 

St. Louis Free Public Library. 

St. Louis Mercantile Library 
Afisn. 

St Paul Public Library. 



48 



LOS ANGEL.B8 PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



St. Vincent's College. Los An- 
geles. 

Salem Public Library. 
San Bernardino Publio 
LiibFanr. 

San Francisco Board of Su- 
pervisors. 

San Francisco Public Library. 

San Mateo Public Library. 

Santa Cktra College. 

Sayle, Robert. Los Angeles. 

Scran ton Public Library. Pa. 

S. C. Scranton Memorial 
Library. Madison. Conn. 

Seattle Public Library. 

Seward. Geo. F., N. Y. 

Slfton. Hon. aiflord. OtUwa. 

Canada. 
Silk Association of America. 

Sleeper. John F.. Elizabeth. 
N. J. 

Smiley, Albert K., Mohonk 

Lake, N. T. 
Smith. Henry F.. Hartford^ 

Conn. 
Somervllle Public Library, 

Mass. 
Society of Colonial Wars. 
South Australia. Public 

Library. Museum and Art 

Gallery. 

Southwest Guide Co.. Los An- 
geles. 

Speiden. Wm., N. Y. 

SprlngHeld City i Library. 
Mass. 

Steward, J. F.. Chicago. 

Stllson. Mrs. W. W.. Los An- 
geles. 

Stockton City Superintendent 
of Schools. 

Stoddart. Miss Evelyn, Los 
Angeles. 

Swan. Charles H., N. Y. 

Syracuse Public Library, 
N. Y. 

Tacoma Public Library, 
Wash. 



Thacher School. Nordhofl. 
Toronto Public Library, Can- 
ada. 
Tufts Library, Weymouth, 

Mass. 
U. S. Military Academy. West 

Point 
Vail, Miss Genevieve, Los 

Angeles. 
Vermont, University of 
Victoria, B. C. Department of 

Agriculture. 
Virginia, University of 
Wade and Wade. Los Angeles. 
Walrond, Geo. W., Denver, 

Col. 
Warder Public Llbnury, 

Springfield, O. 
Warner and Swasey, Cleve- 
land. 
Warren Co. Library and R. R. 

Assn., Monmouth, HI. 
Washington Heights Free 

Library, N. Y. 
Wellesley College. 
Westminster Public Libraries, 

Eng. 
Whitehead, Ralph Radjcliffe, 

Santa Barbara. 
Wllley, Samuel K.. San Fraa- 

Cisco. 

Willhartitz, A.. Los Angeles. 

Wilmington Institute. OaL 

Wilson, Louis N.. Worcester, 
Mass. 

Wisconsin Free Library Com. 

Wisconsin State Historical 
Society. 

Wisconsin, State Superinten- 
dent. 

Wisconsin. University of 

Worcester Free Publio 
Library, Mass. 

York Public Library. Eng. 












Los Angeles Public Library 



ANNUAL REPORT 
i 

j OP THE 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



AND 



LI BRARI AN 



1901-2 



■• ^ 



•^._ii«u»;5 



Fourteenth Annual Report 



OF THE 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



OF THE 



Los Angeles Public Library 



AND 



REPORT OF LIBRARIAN 



DECEMBER, 1902 




< • . 






McBRIDE PRESS 

LM ANOILEt 



Los Angeles Public Library 



DIRECTORS. 

J. Rom Clark, PtesitUnt. 
IsidorbB. DOCKWXn.BR. 
d. w. 9dxi.1can, m. d. 
Arthur W. Pibhbr. 
J. W. Trttxworthy, IC. D. 



COMMITTEES. 



AtUmdanis: Dr. Bdrlkah, Mr. PisBRR. 

Auditing and Accounts : Mr. Fisrbr, Dr. Truxworthy. 

Books and Donations : Mr. Dockwbzx.br, Mr. Pxshbr. 

Printing and Supplies : Dr. Trubwortbt, Dr. Bdbucam. 

Rules and Administration : Mr. Dockwbii.br, Dr. Trub worthy. 

The President is a member of all committeef. 



Mary L. Jones, Librarian and Clerk of the Board, 

Cbua Olbasoh, Assistant Librarian, 

Nora A. MIt.t.bb, Second Assistant Ldhrarian, 

Regular meetings of the Board on the second and fourth Fridays of each 
month, at 4:80 p. m. 

PRINCIPALS OF DEPARTMENTS. 

Plorbhcb Thorhbttro, Cataloguing, 
Anna Mc C. Bbcklby, Reference, 
Obrtrudb B. Darlow, CkusiJIcaiion. 
Mabbl S. Dumf , School. 
Mary A. Jorhsoh, Accession. 
Pbarl B. Olbason, Finance, 
Mamib Bbmh btt, Fiction, 
Christimb Cz^ARK, Registration, 

Mab D. BLAHCHARD,ywfiimf/r. 

Rose Bbbrhart, MmI, 



May B. Kbach Dora L< Maboh Prahcbs P. Nisbbt 

Oboroia Horan Bbzx Smith Bzxa 8. Moroan 

Btbblwyiv H. Paoob JoaBPHiH b Dancastbr Clara Hiicdlb 

Victoria Blub Ida G. MuHSoif 



BRANCH AND HALF DAY ATTENDANTS. 

HkMQAMWt P. MBLZn 8TBLI.A C. BBCKXXT A«KA MaDOOIT 

91CZLIB jACKlOir 



NIQHT ATTENDANTS. 

jAirs L. Skxpajld Juua WtncAir Okacb M. Whxtb 

JsasBLTii Andrsws Bkma J. Browm Claka M. Rowbix 

I^THLiB T. Bldudob Kathsrhtb M. Chasb Lauxa A. HiLUS 

Sakab K. ICiLLUL Anjuur P. Cushhto, SubsHtuU 



nwannB Jonmoir, JanHor, 

Hahitah C&oicnf , CZmumt. 

Mart Lopb&, J^niior, CnUrmi Awmtts Brautk. 



MAIN LIBRARV. 
Open 9 a. m, to 9:80 p. m. Sundays and HoUdaySi 1 p. m. to 9 p. 



BRANCH LIBRARIES. 

Open daily except Sunday. Ptom SKX) to S jQO and MO to 9300 p. 

Central 9696 Central Avenue 

Vernon • Comer Vernon and Central Avenue 

Prom 6KN> to 9:00 p. m. 
Ifacy ... Comer ICacy and Garibaldi Street 
Oarvansa .... Bagle Rock and ATenue 64 



DELIVERY STATIONS. 

CoUectionaO 



a. m. 1 
p. m. ) 



Monday, Wednesday, Saturday 
D^veries 6 p. 

1963 B. Pirst Street - Boyle Heights Drug Store 

Hoover and Twenty^Pourth Sts. . C. S.. Smead 

Daly Street and Pasadena Ave. • . W. A. Harmon 
aeSl West Pico Street - - - - H. B. Howard 
SlOO West Seventh Street - - Westlake Pharmacy 
HoUenbeck Home 



Collections 2 p. m. 

' Daily 
Deliveries 6 p. 



p. m. ) 
>. m. ) 



T. W. C. A. Rooms ... 828 West Third Street 



REPORT 

OPTHB 

BOARD OP DIRECTORS 

OP Tin 

Los Angeles Public Library 



D«c«mb«rr 1902. 



To the Council of the City of Los Angeles, 

Qentlemen: In accordance with the requirements of the 
City Charter, the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Pub- 
lic Library herewith submit their report for the year ending 
November 30th, 1902: 

This Board went into office on April 2nd, 1901, under 
aiypointment of the Mayor, Honorable M. P. Snyder, and sub- 
sequent confirmation by the City Council, for the Charter 
term of two years. 

Under the supervision of this Board, the Library is now usmry l^rc« 
conducted by a Librarian, two Assistant Librarians, ten prin- 
cipals of departments and twenty-four general attendants. 
There are in addition three employees who attend to the 
Janitor service. 

There are now in our Library 81,306 volumes, 6685 vtli 
pamphlets, 666 maps and 6693 pictures. At the time of our 
last report, in December, 1901, we had 67,364 volumes, 4107 
pamphlets, 417 maps and 3336 pictures. The net increase in 
volumes alone for the year just passed, after making deduc- 
tions for books lost or discarded, is therefore 18,961. 

We now have 28,460 registered card holders, entitled to jn^ii 
library privileges. 



6 1*08 ANOBUS PUBUC UBRART 



nrmhitif Since the date of our last report 676,141 volumes were 

circulated for home use and 230,416 volumes for Library use; 
thereby representing a gain in circulation over last year 
of 103,698 for home use and 89,119 for the Library; which 
affords a striking instance of the remarkable growth of our 
Library. In addition we have loaned pictures to the number 
of 7264. 

Library Until last year the Library Training Class usually con- 

'^'^hSS sisted of six members. Owing however to the need of the 
Library for more attendants to provide for increased work 
and to replace losses by resignation, promotion or other 
causes, this Board appointed eight young ladies to the 14th 
Training Class; of the graduates of which however, only 
one now remains without regular appointment We there- 
fore deemed it expedient to constitute our present training 
class, the 15th, with a membership of fourteen, and from 
present Indications, the wisdom of this course seems fuUy 
justified. 

Sapport Your honorable Body allotted to the Library, for its sup- 

port for the current fiscal year ending June 30, 1903, as its 
portion of the fl.OO tax rate, four cents and seven mills 
(I .047) on each $100.00 of assessed valuation, which will 
furnish the estimated sum of $40,660.28. This sum although 
greater than last year's estimated apportionment will not 
be more than sufllcient to enable us to keep up with the pres- 
ent demand and normal increase of Library requirements. 

Salary' LUt Realizing that the salaries heretofore paid our Library 

attendants have not been in many instances a fair com- 
pensation for the work performed, this Board some months 
since, made such adjustment of the salary list as the state 
of our finances permitted, by raising the salaries of attend- 
ants, exclusive of the executive staff, in such amounts as in 
each individual case the character of employment, proficiency 
and corresponding responsibility, in our opinion Justified. 
Our present monthly salary list now aggregates $1660; and 
after January 1st, 1903, will be $1796 by reason of additional 

increases resulting from the operation of our Civil Service 
regulations. 

Attached to this Report will be found a Schedule showing 
the names, length of service, and monthly salary of each Li- 



AHPORT OP THB BOARD OF DIRBCTOR8 



brary employee as established and going into elEect on Jan- 
uary 1st, 1903. A careful inspection of this schedule will re- 
veal to any disinterested observer that many of our Library 
attendants, notwithstanding the recent raise of salaries, are 
still underpaid, when comparison is made with salaries of 
employees in other departments of the City Qovemment 

Attached hereto and made a part hereof is the report Librartaa'* 
to us of the Librarian of the Los Angeles Public Library, ^'^^'^ 
which furnishes a detailed statement of the operations of 
the Library, and contains all the data required by the City 
Charter, and to which reference is hereby made for full par- 
ticulars. 

Under the Charter Amendments approved by vote of the ckartor 
people Dec. 1st, 1902, and to be submitted to the State Legis- A««B4«i«Btj 
lature for final ratification at its coming session in January 
next, great advantage will accrue to the Library. In the 
first place, instead of the entire Library Board going out of 
office at the same time every two years as heretofore, pro- 
vision has been made that the term of office of a Library Di- 
rector shall be four years, and the term of each Director shall 
be so arranged that one goes out of office every year for 
three years and two every four years. Therefore, at no time 
Is there likely to be any radical change in the policy of ad- 
ministration. In the second place, the Library will always 
hereafter receive a guaranteed support of not less than four 
cents on each $100.00 of assessed valuation of City property. 
Instead of the uncertainty as to income always heretofore 
obtaining, in view of the present Charter provision providing 
for no minimum, but establishing a maximum of not more 
than five cents on each $100.00 assessed valuation. 

The need of a new Library Building is imperative, and N«wUbrary 
well known to all patrons of the Library as well as the large Q"*'^*'* 
majority of our citizens; therefore there is no present neces- 
sity of adding anything to what has already been written 
upon this topic in previous reports of Library boards for the 
past ten years. However, inasmuch as the Charter Amend- 
ments heretofore referred to, have provided that the bonded 
Indebtedness of the Municipality may reach $6,000,000, it is 
the intention of this Board, as soon as said Amendments 
have become effective, to petition your honorable body to 



8 ItOS ANGBUm PUBUC LIBRARY 



submit to a rote of the people the questioii of iBauing bonds 
to the extent of |3&0,000, for the construction and equipment 
of a new Library Building. 

In conclusion we desire to return our sincere thanks to 
the Library force* in general, for the splendid results ac- 
complished on behalf of the Library, often under the most 
unfayorable and discouraging circumstances; as well as to 
you, gentlemen of the Council, for the generous support 
ever accorded us during our term of office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. ROSS CLARK, 
ARTHUR W. FISHER, 
ISIDORE B. DOCKWBILBR, 
J. W. TRUBWORTHY, 
D. W. EDELMAN. 

December 16, 1902. 



RBPORT OP TBH BOARD OP DIRl^CTORS 9 



SCHEDULE OF SALARIES. 

Lengtli 
of service. 
Tears, Months. Salary. 

Mary L. Jones 8:11 $150.00 

Celia Gleason 13:1 100.00 

Nora A. Miller 10:5 75.00 

Florence Thomburg 10: 5 70.00 

Anna McC. Beckley 9:10 70.00 

Gertrude B. Darlow 9:6 70.00 

Mabel S. Dunn 9:2 60.00 

Mary J. Johnson 9:2 62.50 

Pearl E. Gleason 8:4 50.00 

Georgia Horgan 8:3 40.00 

Mamie Bennett 6:9 55.00 

Christine Clark 6:6 55.00 

Mae D. Blanchard 6:6 55.00 

May B. Keach 5:10 45.00 

Rose Eberhart 5:10 52.50 

Dora L. Mason 4:8 45.00 

Frances F. Nisbet 4:8 45.00 

Belle Smith 3:9 40.00 

Ella S. Morgan 3:9 40.00 

Ethelwyn H. Fagge 3:9 40.00 

Josephine Dancaster 3:4 40.00 

Clara Hindle 3:4 40.00 

Victoria Ellis 3:4 37.50 

Ida G. Munson 2:11 37.50 

Margaret P. Melzer 2:7 35.00 

Stella C. Beckley 2:6 35.00 

Anna Madison 1:9 35.00 

Emilie Jackson 1:7 35.00 

Julia WItman 1:5 27.50 

Grace M. White 1:5 27.50 

Jesselyn Andrews 1:3 27.50 

Emma J. Brown :8 25.00 

Clara M. Rowell :8 25.00 

Lynlie Y. Eldridge :8 25.00 

Katherine M. Chase :8 25.00 

Laura S. Hillis :7 25.00 

Sarah K. Miller :7 25.00 



Report of Librarian 



1901-1902 



To ike Board of Directors of the Los Angeles J\^lic Library, 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit the fourteenth 
annual report of the Los Angeles Public Library, coverinK 
the year ending Nov. 30th, 1902. 

The condition of the library, together witl^ the work 
accomplished during the y^ear, is herewith presented by de- 
partments and in tabulated statements. 

■ 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The City Council apportioned to the library fund for the 
fiscal year ending June 30th, 1903, four and seyen-tenths 
($.047) on each one hundred dollars of taxable property in 
the city, amounting under the present assessed valuation to 
$40,560.28. As will be seen in Appendix VIII, this rate is two 
mills more than has been granted before to the library, and 
compares most favorably with the income of other libraries 
of a similar character in cities of equal size. Owing to the 
location of the library in the City Hall, we are free from 
many of the expenses incident to the care of an entire build- 
ing, such as light, heat and elevator service; hence a larger 
proportion of this sum may be devoted to books. 

The receipts and expenditures of the library fund for the 
past year are as follows: 



REPORT OF TMK UBRARIAN H 



Receipts. 
Balance on hand Nov. SOtli, 1901— 

City Treasury $11,317.10 

Petty cash 116.72 

Trust fund 299.46 

Received balance of apportionment, 

1901-1902 $18,926.93 

Received on apportionment, 1902-1903. 22,314.14 

Fines $ 1.985.83 

Dues 82.50 



$11,733.27 



36,241.07 



2,018.33 

Postal cards sold 85.22 

Finding lists sold 73.40 

Books lost and paid for 107.87 

Rebate on books 283 .12 

Supplies sold 4.82 

Periodicals lost and paid for 2.20 

Deposits received 1,082.50 



Expenditures. 

Salaries, Staff $17,011.29 

Salaries, Janitors 1,008.00 



$51,631.80 



$18,019.29 



Books ..' 15,006.68 

Books lost and paid for, money refunded 15.67 

Periodicals 1,679.66 

Binding 3,137.54 

Printing 497.75 

Supplies 602.20 

Postage 120.93 

Freight and cartage 487.37 

General expense 182. 55 

Insurance 269.00 

Furniture 1,002.64 

Rent 40.00 

Deposits returned 1,049.00 

Balance, Petty Cash 75.13 

Trust Fund 327.95 

City Treasury 9,118.44 



it 



$51,631.80 



12 I«08 ANGELES PUBLIC I^IBRARY 



School Library Fund. 
Receipts — 

Nov. 30th, 1901, balance $ 8.01 

Apportionment 1,600.00 

Total $1,608.01 

Expenditures — 

Periodicals I 265.16 

Books 1,330.93 

Balance 11.92 

Total $1,608.01 

CIRCULATION. 

1901-2. 1902-3. Qain. 

Home 472,643 576,141 103,598 

Library 191,296 230,415 39,119 

Total 663,839 806,556 142.717 

Pictures loaned 7,254 

During the year Just closed the library was open for 
the exchange of books 302 days. The reference and reading 
rooms were open 364 days. The heaviest day's issue was 
on Oct 11th, 1902, amounting to 5,838; the smallest, Dec. 
19th, 1901, numbering 1,594. The home circulation is ac- 
curate, the summary of definite records, and yet this does not 
fully represent the use of books drawn from the library. 
Books loaned to teachers are renewed every fortnight, though 
they sometimes remain in a school two months and no rec- 
ord is kept of the number of times a teacher loans the books. 
Books loaned to private teachers, and to deposit stations, are 
kept on an average of one month; if not returned within 
that time they are renewed. The library use of books, as in 
former years, is simply an estimate, being the number left 
on the tables by readers. As open access prevails in all de- 
partments, except fiction, readers themselves replace many 
of the books. No attempt is made to record the magazines 
and newspapers read in the reading room. The character of 
the circulation will be found in its different phases in the 
appendites, also in the remarks under individual depart- 
ments. 



REPORT OP THE LIBRARIAN 13 



REGISTRATION. 

Registration for the year 

Men 8,111 

Women 6,011 

8,122 

Renewals 175 

Withdrawals 352 

Total registration 28,450 

Lost card checks issued 1,630 

Non-fiction cards 8,400 

Change of address noted 1,715 

Notices sent 802 

Re-registration of patrons under the new system com- 
menced in November of 1899, is completed, and for the first 
time in many years an accurate report of the number of live 
cards is possible. The proportion of registered readers to 
the population of the city is uncommonly high, owing un- 
doubtedly, to the number of tourists who make use of the 
library. As many of the visitors return year after year they 
do not go through the formality of withdrawing their cards. 
Out of town residents owning no city property availed them- 
selves of borrower's privileges to the number of fifty-four 
during the year. 

ACCESSIONS AND BINDING. 

Volumes reported Dec. 1st, 1901 67,354 

added 15,558 

" lost and returned 19 

discarded 1,523 

lost and paid for 89 

" lost by rebinding 14 

Net increase 13,951 

Total volumes in Library 81,305 

Pamphlets added 1,578 

Total pamphlets in Library 5,685 

Maps added 138 

Total maps in Library 555 

Pictures added 2,257 

Total pictures in Library 5,593 

Volumes bound 7,185 

Volumes mended 36,182 






14 LOS ANOBl#B8 PUBUC UtBMAMY 



A detailed statement of accessions by classes will be 
found in Appendix I. In Appendix VIII is noted the growth 
of the library year by year since 1894, where it will be seen 
that in eight years the library has doubled in sise, and that 
in the past two years more than one-fourth the entire con- 
tents has .been added. An analysis by classes of the books in 
the library with the comparative use will be found in Ap- 
pendix IV. Granting uniformity of quality, it is found that 
the supply is ^ore than proportionate to the demand in all 
branches except school readers, bound magazines and fiction, 
and in the last named department the children are better 
supplied than aduUs. 

Of the 16,668 volumes added during the year, 2,968 were 
purchased from the school fund, 291 were gifts and 990 Pub- 
lic Documents, giving a net total of 11,319 bought from the 
library book fund. 

Of the books discarded all considered of permanent value 
are replaced at once, a careful record being kept of those 
which it is considered inexpedient to replace or impossible to 
procure. 

CLASSIFICATION AND SHELF. 

Classified and shelf listed: 

Classes, general library 3,604 

Classes, reference 1,696 

Classes, Juvenile 6,041 

Book numbers assigned: 

Fiction, adult 2.646 

Fiction, Juvenile 4,681 

Pamphlets classified 1,678 

Pictures classified: 

Reference 2,110 

School 1.131 

The re-numbering of Juvenile fiction by the Cutter Sys- 
tem has been completed. Shelf lists have been re-written 
for class 800, literature, comprising some 6,000 entries, also 
for class 100. philosophy, and work has commenced on a 
new copy of the reference shelf list. A shelf list of pamph- 
lets has been undertaken and has progressed as far as class 



RHFORT OF THS IJBRARIAN 15 



800. The photographs and other pictures in the reference 
department are being re-classified, an adaptation and ex- 
tension of the regular Dewey classification having been made 
for that purpose. A shelf list of the pictures so far as classi- 
fied has been typewritten. 

Owing to circumstances the assistant in the shelf depart- 
ment has been somewhat irregularly assigned and the work 
in consequence has not progressed to the satisfaction of the 
principal of the department. 

CATALOGUING. 

Number of volumes catalogued: 

Classes 200-900 inclusive 2,342 

Class 100 34 

Fiction, adult 390 

Fiction, Juvenile 1,656 

1,845 

Classes 000-100 and music (bulletin cards 

only) 206 



Total 4,627 

Approximate number of cards t3n>ewritten 19,600 

Library of Congress proofs cut and filed 29,719 

titles ordered 2,106 

cards ordered 6,278 

titles received 1,289 

cards received 3,867 



« #c « 

(I « <f 

it i€ « 



The re-organization of this department to the use of the 
printed cards of the Library of Congress has been the prin- 
cipal work of the year. Proofs of all cards issued are re- 
ceived, .cut to the desired size and are filed alphabetically. 
As orders for new books are placed the corresponding cards 
are ordered for the catalogue. Work on the un-catalogued 
portion of the library has been delayed with the hope that the 
same classes in the Library of Congress would soon be catar 
logued and we could then avail ourselves of the work. 

Continuing an experiment tried last year, fiction both 
juvenile and adult, has been catalogued by the principals of 
the respective departments under the supervision of the 



16 I*08 ANG8I«HS PUBtIC UBRART 



head cataloguer. The plan has worked to the satiBfaction 
of all three departments interested. 

During the past year the cataloguing department has suf- 
fered many changes in its force, hut one assistant remaining 
who was engaged in the work a year ago. In January the prin- 
cipal was granted a leave of absence till May 1st, at which 
time she resigned. In June the temporary appointment was 
made permanent In July one assistant was granted a leave 
of six months, and later another was given a leave of one 
month. As it is difficult to supply this department from the 
general attendants, the work has naturally suffered from 
these interruptions. Because of the difficulty under which 
the department has labored the principal and her assistants 
deserve unusual credit for the work they have accomplished. 
The number of books catalogued is somewhat less than that 
reported last year. However, the task of handling the proofs 
of the Obrary of Congress cards compensates for the loss in 
books catalogued. The new system has not yet arrived at 
the stage where it is labor-saving. Another year will as- 
suredly reach it 

REFERENCE. 

Volumes Dec. 1st, 1901 18,087 

" added, miscellaneous 892 

periodicals 694 

" " documents 990 

discarded 1 

Net increase 2,530 

Total volues Nov. 30th, 1902 20,617 

Pictures Dec. Ist, 1901 2,263 

added 1,126 

Total pictures 8,889 

Books consulted 109,467 

Readers (estimated) 44,328 



The work of the past year has been of unusual import- 
ance. Notwithstanding the increased equipment noted above, 
the resources of the department have frequently been taxed 
to the utmost Bibliographies and reading lists have been 



RBPORT OP THK UBRARIAK 17 

prepared on a wide range of subjects, some of which hare 
been published In the Monthly Bulletin. The various clubs 
and study classes aside from the educational institutions of the 
city have long since learned the value of the library, and there 
is a growing tendency on their part to call upon the reference 
department for assistance. 

The important works added to this department are too 
numerous to mention. Complete files of seventeen magazines 
all indexed in Poole, were added. Among these perhaps the 
most notable was a set of the New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register. The publication of several societies 
have been added, including complete files of the publications 
of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 
the Hakluyt Society, the American Society of Civil Engineers, 
also the British Institute of Civil Engineers from volume ten 
to date. Many excellent books on furniture and on garden- 
ing have recently appeared, most of which we have been 
able to procure. The department of literature has been en- 
riched by a complete set of the publications of the Early Eng- 
lish Text Society, and though it Is in the circulating depart- 
ment, the complete set of the Greek and Latin classics in 
the Teubner edition will greatly strengthen the reference 
work. Kingsborough's Antiquities of Mexico and the Nuttall 
Codex, with Nordenskiold's CllfF-Dwellers of the Mesa Verde, 
have been supplemented by many rare and excellent works 
in Spanish on the archaelogy and early history of the South- 
west 

The purchase of over a thousand photographs lUustrat' 
ing the architecture of France and England, besides several 
popular collections of reproductions of paintings, has greatly 
added to the collection started some years ago. 

Illustrated catalogues of the principal museums and art 
collections have been added so far as obtainable, and while 
they are neither rare nor expenrtve, have proved a valuable 
addition to the art section of tbe library. Cases have been 
provided for the photographs and as noted elsewhere, they 
have been newly classified and shell-listed, thereby render- 
ing them more available than ever before. A set of Ford's 
Etchings of the Missions is another valuable addition. These 



Ig LOS AMGSI«88 rUBXJC LIBRARY 

have been framed and hung in the readlna room, bnt, like 
other pictures, have been loaned on special occasions. 

The use of the documents has continued to increase in 
spite of the inconvenience of the room containing them. The 
sheep-bound set has been re-numbered by serial numbers, 
greatly facilitating research. 

In addition to the regular accessions through the goYem- 
ment, we were able to procure by purchase a valuable col- 
lection of Eixperiment Station Bulletins. This has enabled us 
to complete many volumes for binding which, with the index 
cards purchased from the department in Washington, will 
greatly assist in this important subject 

The crowded condition of the library continues to be felt 
more and more in the reference department The daily work 
is carried on at a disadvantage scarcely conceivable to one 
not familiar with the circumstances. 

GENERAL LIBRARY. 

Volumes, Dec. 1, 1901 26,038 

added 3,573 

discarded 143 

" lost and paid for 13 

Net gain 3,417 

Total volumes Nov. 30th, 1902 29,455 

Circulation, home 80,451 

library 50,186 

Total 180,637 

Readers (estimated) 32,640 

Notices sent 3,107 

Reserve postals filed 997 

Detailed statements of the condition of the work in the 
general classes will be found in Appendixes II, m and IV. 
Appendix VII shows the average number of volumes, class by 
clsss, that are in the hands of readers on the last day of each 
month. This gives an idea of the books used in a some- 
what difterent form from that of the daily circulation. 

The question of shelving grows more and more serious. 
Fortunately, with our increased accessions more books are 



« 



RBPORT OF TH8 UBRAJLIAN 19 



withdrawn. This fact, with the relief afforded by the branches 
has made it possible for us to continue our work to Ihis point. 
But unless some further arrangement is made it will be neces- 
sary to store the less used portion of the library to make room 
for the new books. 



FICTION. 

Volumes, Dec. 1st, 1901 13,286 

added 2,646 

** lost and returned 10 

discarded 797 

lost and paid for 39 

Net gain 1,820 

Total volumes Nov 30th, 1902 15,106 

Circulation, home use 236,480 

library use 7,325 

total 243,755 

Reserve postals filed 1,390 

Notices sent 2,233 



It 






The fiction department contains 18.57 per cent of the con- 
tents of the library and loans 41.03 per cent of the books 
issued for home use. Of the net increase to the library for 
the past year but 13.11 per cent was fiction. It is there- 
fore but natural that the percent of fiction to the entire 
home circulation is 4.69 less than last year. 

An unusually careful record of the books issued, has been 
kept this year. Judged by the sale of reserve postals the fol- 
lowing are the most popular books: 

Audrey 81 reserves 

Crisis 81 

Dorothy Vernon 54 

Virginian 60 

Right of Way 48 

Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch 36 

By an actual count of the number of times books have, 
been issued the following are the most popular: 



20 1*08 ANOBUS PUBLIC UBRARY 



Seven day books — 

Cop. Times. 

Dayld Harum 24 1.096 

Tommy and Orisel 18 663 

Ricfiard Carvel 16 630 

Red Pottage 16 627 

Octopus 13 520 

Battle of the Strong 15 513 

Portion of Labor 16 488 

Janice Meredith 17 478 

Crisis 19 403 

Fourteen day books — 

Ramona 35 731 

King's Jackal 12 392 

Seats of the Mighty 15 389 

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 14 377 

Lorna Doone 17 322 

Soldiers of Fortune 15 319 

Caleb West 13 317 

Under the Red Robe 9 296 

Ben Hur 23 259 

In order to ascertain the most popular authors a record 
-was kept on three average days, of all books issued, with the 
following result: Crawford, 66; King, 45; Doyle, 38; 
Stockton, 36; Crockett, 33; Wilkins, 31; Carey, 30; Pool, 29; 
Kipling, 27; Weyman, 27; Merrlman, 22; Hope, 20; Barr, 
Amelia, 20; Harte, 20. By way of contrast it mi^t be noted 
that the once popular Trilby was issued 68 times, there be- 
ing three copies in circulation. These facts prove nothing, 
of course, but simply show the trend of popular taste in 
reading. The number of times a book leaves the library is 
not an absolute criterion of its popularity. Many books thus 
drawn are returned unread, while others may have been read 
by half a dozen persons and that within a seven days' limit. 
The rate of variation, however, may be considered fairly con- 
stant both in respect to this library from year to year and 
to other institutions doing a similar work. 



RBPOKT OF THE UB&AUAN 21 



JUVENILE. 

Volumes, Dec. Ist, 1901 9,766 

added, fiction 2,041 

classefl 4,680 

discarded 654 

" lost and i>aid for 14 

Net gain 6,153 

Total volumes, Nov. 30th, 1902 16,919 

Notices sent 9.055 

Volumes circulated, home 77,427 

library 24,683 



i« t< 



Total circulation 102,110 

The number of volumes added during the past year al- 
most equals the entire number with which the preceding 
year commenced. Many books for quite young children have 
been added for use in the branches. Owing to the location 
in the heart of the city, parents have naturally hesitated 
to send small children to the main library to draw books. 
In the branches it is quite different, and a class of work is 
now being done that was never before possible. The in- 
crease in the home circulation over that of last year amounts 
to 13,439, while the library use has fallen away 5,941. This 
is but the natural consequence of over-crowding. The school 
and juvenile work is done in one room of 26 by 40 feet. 
Except in summer, when the more technical school books 
are stored in the attic, the entire 26,711 volumes in the two 
departments are shelved in this room. When the number of 
volumes issued for home and school use is considered, it is 
plain to be seen that very little space Is left for readers. In 
the main library littie individual work can be done with the 
children. By continually raising the standard of the books 
purchased, and by duplicating the number of copies of those 
known to be the best, we hope to accomplish the work that 
could be better done in more ample quarters. A careful record 
of the most called for books of the year results in the fol- 
lowing: 



22 I<OS AN09LB8 PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Cop. Times. 

Biography of a Grluly 13 180 

Boys of '76 22 li8 

Blue Fairy Book 13 95 

Green Fairy Book 11 86 

Red Fairy Book 11 81 

Hunters Three 8 67 

Adventures of Tom Sawyer 21 426 

Little Women 27 370 

Bight Cousins 22 280 

Story of a Bad Boy 26 267 

Adyentures of Jimmy Brown 19 243 

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 14 237 

Brethren of the Coast 4 201 

Tom Sawyer Abroad 9 174 

Among the Malay Pirates 6 187 

Cowmen and Rustlers 4 137 

Forward March 4 131 

The pictures more especially under the care of the school 
department, are used In the work with children. Many are 
framed and hang on the wall and others are used in the bul- 
letin work to Illustrate days and notable events. These prove 
not only a source of Instruction to the children who frequent 
the library, but render the room more attractive. A patron 
of the library has very kindly kept the windows supplied 
with growing plants, besides carefully tending them. The 
principal of the department has continued her talks to Child 
Study circles and to different clubs In the city, thus enlist- 
ing the help of parents In choosing their children's reading. 



SCHOOL. 

Volumes Dec. 1st, 1901 8,094 

added 2,958 

discarded 245 

" lost and paid for 15 

Net gain 2,698 



Total volumes Nov. 30th, 1902 10,792 



REPORT OP THB UBRARIAN 28 



Pictures Dec. iBt, 1901 1,164 

added 1.181 

Total number of pictures 2»295 

Books circulated 120,026 

Notices sent 784 

Pictures circulated 1,936 

While the entire library is at the disposal of the teach- 
ers, naturally the books purchased by the school fund and 
for the Juvenile department are of the most use, hence the ad- 
ditions to the Juvenile department should be considered in 
making up an estimate of the equipment for school pur- 
poses. The number of books in the department added this 
year is equivalent to one-fourth the entire school library. In 
addition to the number added by the Board of Education, an 
even greater number has been purchased from the regular 
library fund and the circulation is over fifty per cent greater 
than that of last year. In spite of all this the schools are 
still inadequately served. 

That teachers are availing themselves, as never before, 
of the privileges of the library is shown by the fact that of 
the 590 teachers enrolled, 560 are using the library in their 
school work against 371 out of a total of 545 teachers last 
year. Of the teachers in private schools 109 are availing 
themselves of the four-book privilege against 53 last year. 

The work of the department is multiplied by lack of 
space. Next to the reference, the school department suffers 
most from over-crowding. 

MAIL AND MAGAZINES. 

Periodicals on file in the reading room: 

By gift 137 

By subscription 534 

671 

Circulation, home: 

Bound magazines 7,127 

Unbound magazines 43,011 

Acknowledgments 466 

Notices sent 664 

Magazine covers made 781 

Magazines covered 7,624 

Bulletins mailed 1,879 



24 I«OB ANOSLBS PUBUC LIBRARY 

Of the magazines received, 284 are for use in the reading 
room, 186 for circulation, 38 for the branches, and 4& are 
reserved for binding. Of the newspapers on file 57 are dailies 
and 38 weeklies. 

BRANCHES. 

A detailed statement of the work accomplished in each 
branch is set forth in Appendix V. 

Macy Street branch has continued much the same in 
character and amount of work accomplished as in former 
years. There is a demand for an afternoon opening, and it 
is hoped that it may be provided before many months. The 
Board of Education continues to bear the incidental expenses 
of this branch. The number of volumes placed at this branch 
has varied with the demand; at the close of the year there are 
on the shelves or in the hands of readers, 767 volumes. The 
home circulation has amounted to 2,662 and the reading room 
use to 10,839. 

Central Ave. branch, established a little over a year ago, 
has made most satisfactory progress. Since June, in addition 
to the evening, the branch has been opened from three to five 
o'clock, the attendant being scheduled from the main library. 
During the summer the patronage in the afternoon was not 
large owing chiefly to the unpleasantness of the room. In 
October the branch was removed to more commodious quar- 
ters, and since then the attendance and circulation has been 
most gratifying. In its present quarters the branch will be- 
gin the new year admirably equipped. Additional shelving 
has been erected, a kindergarten table and chairs have been 
provided by the Board of Education, additional pictures have 
been loaned by the Civic League, making the room altogether 
a most attractive one. The number of volumes assigned to 
this branch has varied from time to time. When it was first 
opened, thirteen months ago, three hundred volumes were 
sent down; at present there are 1,200 volumes on the shelves 
or in the homes of readers. The circulation for the year has 
been most gratifying, 11,321 volumes having been issued for 
home use, and 12,897 read in the Horary, no record having 
been kept of magazines. The attendance for the year has 



RBPORT OF THB T,TBR4BTAW 25 

amovnted to 16,899. So successful has been this branch that 
with the expiration of the year the Library Board assumed 
the entire financial responsibility, thus relieving the citisens, 
who had heretofore provided for the incidental expenses. 

Vernon branch was opened Jan. 20th, the expenses of 
rent, heat, light and janitor service being borne by the people 
of that locality. At first the library was open evenings only, 
from six to nine. Commencing with June an afternoon service 
from three to five was also provided. The room first rented 
by the association proved too small and in May the branch 
was transferred to Vernon Avenue, where it now occupies a 
room, commodious and well lighted. As will be seen from the 
detailed statement in Appendix V, the work of this branch 
has steadily increased. It opened with a collection of about 
three hundred volumes, which has been added to month by 
month, and books have been returned to the main library 
as they were no longer called for. At the present time there 
are on the shelves or in the hands of readers of that branch 
870 volumes. The home circulation for the ten months the 
branch has been open amounted to 4,520 volumes, the library 
use to 6,677 volumes. 

Qarvanza branch was opened in June, the hours being 
from six to nine. As in other branches through its probation 
period, the incidental expenses are met by the residents of 
that suburb. Starting with three hundred volumes, it now 
numbers 921, though, as in the case of the other branches, 
this does not represent all the books that have constituted 
its equipment from the beginning. During the six months 
it has been opened the branch has loaned 1,467 volumes; 
4,182 books have been used in the room, while the attend- 
ance has numbered 2,845. 

DELIVERY STATIONS. 

In addition to deliveries conducted through the branches 
seven stations are in operation, three of which were added 
since the last report; namely. West Seventh Street, HoUen- 
beck Home, and the Y. W. C. A. A detailed statement of the 
work accomplished through these stations is given in Ap- 
pendix VI. Since March 1st collections and deliveries have 



26 I«Oe A1V6BLK8 PUBUC I«IBRART 



been made by the Janitor and the service Is much more sat- 
isfactory than when It was conducted by an outside firm. 
The work of the delivery stations has grown to the point 
where It Is a distinct relief to the main library as well as 
a convenience to the patrons. Many are enabled thus to 
enjoy the pleasures of reading who would otherwise be cut 
oft entirely from that resource. This Is especially the case 
at the Hollenbeck Home, many of the residents being too old 
or Infirm to visit the library. The station conducted at the 
T. W. C. A. has proved a convenience to the young women 
who lunch at that Institution, whose noon hour would other- 
wise be too short to admit of an exchange of books. 

DEPOSIT STATIONS. 

Books loaned to the Fire Companies have continued to be 
appreciated by the firemen of the city. An average of 76 
books a month has been sent them, against 66 last year. 

In February application was made by the Sunday School 
of the Third Presbsrterlan Church for a loan of fifty volumes 
to be used by them In conjunction with the Sunday School 
Library. It happens that the librarian of this Sunday School 
is a member of our own stafT, and more careful reports of 
the work accomplished are possible than would otherwise 
be the case. During the nine months that this deposit sta- 
tion has been in operation with the constantly varying fifty 
volumes, 807 books have been issued. 

During the summer months a loan of 25 books was 
granted the El Felix Hogar Settlement on Buena Vista street 
The Interest in them somewhat subsided with the opening 
of school and the loan has not been renewed. 

In October fifty volumes were loaned to the Pico Heights 
Improvement Society for use In their amusement room. This 
is located within a block of the Pico Heights delivery sta- 
tion, thereby providing additional library facilities for that 
portion of the city. 

INTER-LIBRARY LOANS. 

Under an arrangement of some years ago by which an 
Inter-change of books was agreed upon, this libruy has loaned 



RBPORT OF THB TJBRARTAN 27 



to neighboring libraries 78 YolumeB during the year and has 
borrowed five. Ten libraries have borrowed from as and 
two have loaned. In erery case the library becomes responsi- 
ble for the book borrowed and re-loans under its own regular 
tions. 

TRAINING CLA8S. 

The fourteenth training class was graduated April 26th, 
consisting of the following: Emma J. Brown, Clara M. Row- 
ell, Katherine M. Chase, Lynlie T. Bldridge, Laura S. Hillls, 
Sarah K. Miller and Aileen F. Cushing. In September the 
fifteenth class was formed, consisting of Charlottd Casey, 
Shirley M. Coleman, Minerva M. Frazier, Norma E. Glass, 
Katherine M. Hilton, Jessie K. Kidder, Kathleen M. Miller, 
Margaret V. Moloney, Winifred E. Peters, Laura Rathwell, 
Eleanor C. Spellmeyer, Madge N. Teague, Lucy H. Thomas, 
Edith M. Wheat. Miss Thomas has since resigned. 



ADMINISTRATION. 

Changes on the staff have been important, though actual 
resignations have been but three. In December Miss Nevin, 
principal of the Cataloguing department, was granted a leave 
of absence till May 1st. Miss Thomburg, of the School de- 
partment, was transferred to the Cataloguing department as 
a supply; Miss Dunn from Fiction to School, and Miss Ben- 
nett from Mail to Fiction. In May Miss Nevin presented her 
resignation. Miss Nevin was a graduate of the fourth train- 
ing class, and has been in charge of her department since 
1897. She is a cataloguer of rare ability and in her with- 
drawal the library sustains an uncommon loss. Under the 
rule adopted some two years ago, the position was filled by 
a competitive examination open to all graduates of the train- 
ing class. As a result of this examination Miss Thomburg 
was appointed to the principalship of the Cataloguing depart- 
ment. The other two temporary transfers were made perma- 
nent and Biiss Eberhart was appointed principal of the Mail 
department. In March Miss Shepard, who was absent on 
leave, presented her resignation to accept the position of 



28 IfOa ANGBL9S PUBUC UBRARY 



cataloguer in the Mechanics Institute of San Francisco. In 
March Miss Kane resigned, likewise Miss Benz, our only sub- 
stitute at the time. To fill these vacancies Miss Munson and 
Miss Ellis were appointed to the day staff, and Miss Brown, 
Miss Rowell, Miss Eldridge, Miss Chase, Miss HiUis and 
Miss Sarah Miller were appointed to the night staif. The 
development of the branches was recognized in October by 
the creation of a new class of attendants known as Branch 
and half day attendants. These are engaged from six to nine 
at the branches and for the remaining four hours at the main 
library. They practically have charge of their respective 
branches, the afternoon attendant being scheduled from the 
regular force. To fill these positions Miss Stella Beckley was 
appointed to Macy, Miss Madison to Central, Miss Melzer to 
Vernon, and Mrs. Jackson to Garvanza. The staff has suf- 
fered much from illness, and several prolonged leaves of ab- 
sence were granted on that score. Miss Dunn, Miss Keach, 
Miss Munson, Mrs. Jackson, Miss Johnson, Miss Fagge, Miss 
Stella Beckley, Miss Ellis, Miss Melzer and Miss Bldridge 
have been absent for periods of from one to six months, all 
because of ill health. The work has fallen correspondingly 
heavy upon the remainder of the stafP. 

In October a readjustment of the salaries of all princi- 
pals of departments and general attendants was made, and 
on behalf of the staft I desire to thank the Board for their 
generous consideration. The staff is to be commended for 
their conscientious service under circumstances growing 
more and more difficult each day. The public can have small 
idea of the inconvenience under which work is performed in 
our present crowded quarters. 

In conclusion I thank the Board of Directors for the cor- 
dial support given at all times in the administration of the 
library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MART L. JONES, 
December 6th, 1902. Librarian. 



29 



APPENDIXES 



L StaHsHcs of Accessions. 

II. ClassiJUd SiaiisHcs of Cir€ulati4m^ Home and 
Library. 

III. General Home Circulation. 

IV. Comparative Statement of Books and Circulation. 
V. Branches. 

VI. Delivery and Deposit Stations. 

■ 

VII. Books Outstanding. 
VIII. Comparative Statement. 
IX. Donors to the Library. 



90 



L08 ANGSL98 PUBLIC LIBRARY 



APPENDIX I 



STATISTICS OP ACCESSIONS 



1 


Books in 
Library 
Dec. 1st, 1901 


Books Added 
1901-2 


Discarded, 
Lost and Paid 
for 1901-2 


Lost Books 
Returned 


Lost by 
Binding 


Books in 
Library 
Dec. 1st, 1902 


Totals 




Circ. 


Ref. 

802 

26 

237 

464 
167 
486 
279 
306 
760 
445 
660 
291 

■ ••••••• 

"*198 

........ 

... ..... 

6326 
8261 


Circ 


Ref. 

66 
2 
21 
64 
11 

103 
96 
64 

304 
63 
73 
33 

""i 

704 
990 

2686 


Cite. 

'""j 

6 
62 
9 
15 
6 
7 

63 

26 

37 

16 

16 

6 

2 

11 

16 

431 

836 

62 


Ref 






Circ. 


Ref. 




000 

100 


609 

1039 

2526 

3291 

972 

2662 

1397 

1116 

4764 

3293 

3064 

2328 

937 

459 

282 

679 

963 

4591 

13286 

1239 


13 

86 

481 

846 

1391 

872 

274 

203 

1820 

1337 

732 

304 

164 

73 

9 

29 

120 

2041 

2646 

31 

12972 


622 

1118 

3001 

4066 

2364 

3411 

1666 

1312 

6022 

4608 

3769 

2616 

1086 

626 

289 

698 

1064 

6208 

16106 

1208 


368 
27 
268 
617 
176 
689 
375 
370 
1064 
606 
623 
324 

2 

"em 

9242 


990 
1146 


200 








8269 


300 


1 






4602 


400 




2 


2630 


600 

600 


••••• 


2 


4000 
2041 


700 








1682 


800 

900 

910 


• • ■•• 


1 
3 




7076 
5116 
4882 


920 




... . 




2940 


French 








1086 


German 


• ••** 






626 


Italian.. 






289 


Spanish 
Mnsic... 


•• • • • 


1 


■" '3 

• M • • • • 

• 


796 
1066 


Juv.Fic. 
Fiction 
Bd.Mag 
Docs.... 


— • m m 


2 
10 


6203 

15106 

7238 






9 
14 


9242 






1611 


1 


19 




Totals... 


49267 


18087 


60646 


20661 


81306 



Nnmber of pamphlets added 1678 

Total 6685 

Number of pictures added 2257 

Total 6693 

Number of maps added 188 

ToUl 655 

Total number of volumes in library Dec. 1st, 1902 81305 



U 



▲PPBNDIX n 



31 



APPENDIX II 

CLASSIFIED STATISTICS OP CIRCULATION. 

HOne AND LIBRARY. 



Qbm 



000 

100. 

200. 

300 

400 

500 

600 

700 

800 

900 

910 

920 

Piench 

German 

Italian 

Spanish 

Mnaic 

Juvenile Fiction .... 

Fiction 

Magazines, Bound. 

*' Unbound 

Documents 



Totol. 



1900-1901 



18780 

8664 

13059 

27218 

20108 

28864 

17484 

17029 

43650 

27588 

30139 

18630 

4484 

3141 

585 

3744 

4874 

77465 

221376 

30405 

43901 

2651 



663839 



1901-1902 



19623 

8789 

18476 

35413 

37719 

35930 

19255 

19043 

52248 

40264 

34779 

22279 

4896 

3531 

591 

4664 

6877 

92770 

243766 

41212 

59837 

4602 



806556 



Gain 



843 

126 

5417 

8195 

17611 

7066 

1771 

2014 

8598 

12676 

4640 

8649 

415 

390 

6 

920 

2003 

15305 

22379 

10807 

•15936 

t 1961 



142717 



Per Cent of 
drcnUtlon 



2.43 

1.09 

2.28 

4.89 

4.68 

4.45 

2.39 

2.36 

6.48 

4.99 

4.30 

2.75 

.67 

.43 

.07 

.68 

.84 

11.61 

30.22 

6.10 

7.42 

.67 



100.00 



* Home use only. 



t Ifibrary nae only. 



32 



1,08 ANOKUCS PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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APPENDIX IV 



83 



APPENDIX IV 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OP BOOKS 
AND CIRCULATION 



Claas 



000. 



100... 



200. 



300.. 



400.. 
600. 
600. 
700. 



OUU.M< 



900. 
910. 



920. 



French. 



German. 



Italian 



Spanish... 
Music. 



Juvenile Fiction.. 
Fiction 



Bound Magazines 
Unbound Mag'z*s 



Total. 



Books for 
Circulation 


Per Cent 
byaass 


11 

496 


Per Cent, 
by Class 


Percentage 
Ratio 1901-02 


Percentage 
Ratio 190(M)1 


622 


1.02 


.08 


.07 


.04 


1118 


1.84 


5739 


.99 


.63 


.66 


3001 


4.96 


8619 


1.49 


.30 


.24 


4086 


6.73 


21216 


3.68 


.54 


.46 


2364 


3.88 


23188 


4.02 


1.03 


.57 


3411 


5.62 


22926 


3.98 


.70 


.67 


1666 


2.74 


7467 


1.29 


.47 


.36 


1312 


2.16 


7209 


1.25 


.57 


.49 


6022 


9.93 


31037 


6.39 


.64 


.66 


4608 


7.69 


27659 


4.80 


.63 


.51 


3769 


6.19 


19374 


3.36 


.64 


.64 


2616 


4.31 


10414 


1.80 


.41 


.40 


1086 


1.79 


3637 


.61 


.34 


.41 


626 


.86 


2289 


.39 


.46 


.63 


289 


.47 


373 


.06 


.12 


.15 


698 


.98 


3260 


.56 


.57 


.66 


1064 


1.74 


5241 


.99 


.66 


.46 


6203 


10.23 


75045 


13.02 


1.27 


1.64 


16106 


26.07 


236430 


41.03 


1.63 


1.68 


1208 


1.99 


13720 
60903 


2.38 
8.83 


1.19 


.80 

• ••■ •••••• 


60646 




676141 


100.00 


100.00 





The Idea] percentage ratio is unity. Below unitv indicates that the supply 
exceeds the demand, above, that the demand exceeds the supply. See A. f,, A. 
Proceedings, 1900 pp. 99-82. 



84 



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902 _ 

901_ 

900 

899_ 

898. 

897 

896. 

895. 

894 

898. 

1892 


ii 


Miyyyyiii 



APPBNDIX IX 



DONORS TO THE LIBRARY 



Aberdeen (Scotland) Public 
Library. 

Aceteylene Qas Journal. 

Acton Rooster. 

Advocate, of Peace. 

Aguilar (N. T.) Free U- 
brary. 

Alameda Public Library. 

Alaskan. 

Albambra Advocate. 

American Coke and Oas Co.» 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

American- Irish Historical 
Society, Boston, Mass. 

American Sentinel. 

Amherst College. 

Anaheim Qasette. 

Amiraux, Frank, Paterson, 
N. J. 

Arixona Blade. 

Armour Institute of Technol- 
ogy, Chicago, m. 

Arnold, Howard Payson, Pas- 
adena. 

Ashley, Roscoe Lewis, Los 
Angeles. 

Associated Charities of Los 
Angeles. 

Australasia, Library Associ- 
ation of. 

Averill, Mrs. Anna S., Los 
Angeles. 



Balch, E. S., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Balch, T. W., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Bangor, (Maine), Public Li- 
brary. 

Battersea (London) PuSlic 
Libraries. 

Beet Sugar Oasette. 

Belmont School. 

Berry, John N., Millbury, 
Mass. 

Betts, William Winthrop, Los 
Angeles. 

Blackmar, Frank W., Topeka, 
Kansas. 

Blue Anchor Society, N. T. 

Bolton, Mrs. Sarah K., Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Borton, F. S., Puebla, Mexico. 

Boston Book Co. 

Boston (Mass.) Children's 
Aid Society. 

Bowdoin College. 

Bridgeport (Conn.) Public 
Library. 

Bristol (Bngland) Public Li- 
brary. 

British Columbia Province 
Library. 

Bronson Library Fund, Wa- 
terbury. Conn. 



APP8NDIX IX 



89 



Biooldine (Mass.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Public Li- 
brary . 

Brown, University, Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Bryn Mawr (Pa.) College. 

Buckingham Palace Road 
(London) Public Library. 

Buffalo (N. Y.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Burlington (Iowa) Free Pub- 
lic Library. 

Burton, O. W., Los Angeles. 

Butte (Montana) Miner. 

California Club Woman, Los 
Angeles. 

California Courier. 

California Cultivator. 

California Independent 

California Society Sons of 
the Revolution, Los An- 
geles. 

California State Library. 

California State Mining Bu- 
rean. 

California, University of. 

Cambridge (England) Uni- 
versity Library. 

Capital. 

Cardiff (Wales) Free Librar- 
ies. 

Carnegie Library, Atlanta, 
Oa. 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburg, 
Pa. 

Carter, Mr. A., Los Angeles. 

Cedar Rapids (Iowa) Public 
Library. 

Chandler, Alice G., Lancas- 
ter, Mass. 



Chase ft Sanborn, Chicago, 

m. 

Chicago and Northwestern 
Railway Co., Chicago, m. 

Chicago (ni.) Library dub. 

Chicago (ni.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Chicago (111.) Municipal Li- 
brary and Bureau of Sta- 
tistics. 

Chicago, University of 

Chlckerlng ft Sons, Boston, 
Mass. 

Chrlstllche Apologete. 

CJhlle Commission at the 
Pan-American Bzposltlon. 

Cincinnati Bnqulrer. 

Cincinnati (Ohio) Museum 
Association. 

Cincinnati (Ohio) Public Li- 
brary. 

Citizens' Commute of the 
National Capital Centen- 
nial Celebration, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Cltrograph. 

Civic Publishing Co., N. Y. 

Clark, Mrs. T. B., Los An- 
geles. 

Cleveland (Ohio) Public Li- 
brary. 

Colorado Telegraph. 

Colton Chronicle. 

Columbia University, New 
York. N. Y. 

Columbian Uhlverslty, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Commercial Bulletin. 

Concord (Mass.) Free Pub- 
lic Library. 



40 



I^OS ANGWJBS PUBUC UBRARY 



Connecticut Bureau of Lia- 
bor. 

Connecticut Public Library 
Commission. 

Conseryative. 

Cossitt Library, Memphis, 
Tenn. 

Cotton, J. H., Los Angeles. 

Council Bluffs (Iowa) Public 
Library. 

Creelman, J. H., Boston, 
Mass. 

Crunden, F. M., St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Cuba Souvenir de la Procla- 
macion de la Republic. 

Darmouth College, Hanover, 
N. H. 

Davidson, George, San Fran- 
cisco. 

De La Vergne, Geo. N., Los 
Angeles. 

Denver (Colo.) School Dis- 
trict No. One. 

Detroit (Mich.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Dos Republicas. 

Dundee (Scotland) Free LI- 
braries. 

Dun's Review. 

East Side House Settlement, 
N. Y. 

Eau Claire (Wis.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Eckler, Peter, New Tork, N. 
Y. 

Edwards, C. A., Santa Bar- 
bara. 

Ellis, H. Bert, M. D., Los An- 
geles. 

E3ngineer's Review. 



Enoch Pratt (Baltimore. Md.) 
Free Library. 

Evanston (111.) Free Li- 
brary. 

FaU River (Mass.) Public 
Library. 

Field Columbian Museum, 
Chicago, ni. 

Figaroa (Habana). 

Fike, E. M., Los Angeles. * 

Flaming Sword. 

Foote, Allen Ripley, Chicago, 

Four Tracks News. 

Fresno Mirror. 

Fresno Republican. 

Fullerton News. 

Funk, S. W., Los Angeles. 

Georgetown * University, 
Washington, D. C. 

Germania. 

Glbsen, Hugh S., Los An- 
geles. 

Gloversville (N. Y.) Free Li- 
brary. 

Glovell, A. C, Los Angeles. 

Good Roads Magazine. 

Grand Rapids (Mich.) Pub- 
lic Library. 

Grand Rapids (Mich.)| Sup- 
perlntendent of Schools. 

Griffith, Mrs. J. T., Los An- 
geles. 

Guide. 

Guinn, James M., Los An- 
geles. 

Hale, (}eorge Walter, Dead- 
wood, S. D. 

Hammersmith (London) 

Public Library. 

Hartford (Conn.) Council of. 



41 



Harvard University. 
HaverhUl (Mass.) Pablic Li- 
brary. 
Heighway, A. B., Los Ange- 

MIB. 

Helena (Mont) PabUc Li- 
brary. 

Hersbey, Miss Mira, Los An- 
geles. 

Hewett» Alfred, Toronto, 
Canada. 

Historical Society of South- 
ern California, Los Ange- 
les. 

Hopkins, F. A., Los Angeles. 

Howard Memorial Library, 
New Orleans, La. 

Hubbard, A. S., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Hueneme Herald. 

Hyde, James H., New Tork. 

niinois Bureau of Labor. 

Illinois, University of. 

Indian Industrial School, 
Carlisle, Pa. 

Indian Rights Association, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Indiana State Library, Indi- 
anapolis. 

Insurance Sun. 

International Catholic Truth 
Society, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Iowa College, OrinneU. 

Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar 
Rapids. 

Jamaica Royal Society of Ag- 
riculture, Commerce and 
Merchants Bxchange. 

Jay, Col. Wm., Katonah, N. 
Y. 



Jennings, Abraham O., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jersey City (N. Y.) Free Li- 
brary. 

John Crerar Library, Chi- 
cago, ni. 

Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Johnson, Henry H., San Fran- 
cisca 

JoUet (lU.) PubUc Ubrary. 

Kansas, University of. 

Kellaway, Rev. W., Los An- 
geles. 

Kinney, Abbott, Los Angeles. 

Knight, Wm. H., Los Ange- 
les. 

Knopf, Dr. S. A., New York. 

Kongl Universitetets, Up- 
sala, Sweden. 

Ladies of the Maccabees. 

Law Notes. 

Lawrence (Mass.) Free Pub- 
lic Library. 

Lawson, Thomas W., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 

Leeds (England) Public Li- 
brary. 

Lei&ngwell, Albert, M. D., 
Providence, R. I. 

Leland Stanford Junior Uni- 
' versity. 

Liberty Review, Lincoln 
(Neb.) Public Library. 

Liverpool (Bngland)( ;Public 
Library, Museum and Art 
Gallery. 

Los Angeles Board of Bduca- 
tion. 

Los Angeles County Auditor. 



42 



L08 ANOBLBS PUBUC UBEARY 



lios Angeles Bvening Eiz- 
press. 

Los Angeles Journal. 

Los Angeles Mining Reyfew. 

Los Angeles News. 

Los Angeles Record. 

Los Angeles Socialist 

Los Angeles Times. 

Lubin, David, New York. 

Ludwig Salvator, Archduke of 
Austria. 

Madera Times. 

Madison (Wis.) Public 
Schools. 

Maiden (Mass.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Manchester (E3ngland); Pub- 
lic Libraries. 

Mansell, W. A. ft Co., Lon- 
don, E3ngland. 

Maryland, University of. 
School of Medicine. 

Massachusetts Bureau of La- 
bor. 

Massachusetts Highway 

Commission. 

Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology (Boston). 

Massachusetts Single Tax 
League (Boston)'. 

McLellan, Geo., F., Los An- 
geles. 

McLellan, Mary E., Los An- 
geles. 

Meacham, Ellen C, Los An- 
geles. 

Mechanics' Institute, San 
Francisco. 

Mercantile Library, New 
York. 



Mercantile Library, St. Loois, 
Mo. 

Merchants' | Association of 
New York, N. Y. 

Methodist Library, New 
York, N. Y. 

Mexico, Commission to the 
Pan-American Exposition. 

Michigan, University of 

Mills, Anna*W., Los Angeles. 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Milwaukee (Wis.) Public 
Schools. 

Minneapolis (Minn.) Public 
Library. 

Minneapolis (Minn.) Park 
Commission. 

Missouri Botanical Garden, 
St Louis, Mo. 

Missouri University, Colum- 
bia, Mo. 

Monitor Mexlcana. 

Montana, University of . 

Montana Record. 

Mt Holyoke College, South 
Hadley, Mass. 

Munk, Dr. A. J., Los Angeles. 

Munn ft Co., New York, N. Y. 

Museum of Fine Arts, Bos^ 
ton, Mass. 

Musical Messenger. 

Nashua (N. H.) Public Li- 
brary. 

National Educational Associ- 
ation, Winona, Minn. 

National Electric Light Asso- 
ciation. 

Nebraska State Historical 
Society. 

Nebraska, University of. 



APPSNDIZ IX 



48 



Newcastle-upon-Tyne (E<ng- 

land) Public Library- 
Newton, W. M.. Redlands. 

New Bedford (Conn.) Free 
Public Library. 

New Britain (Conn.) Insti- 
tute Library. 

New HamiMshlre Historical 
Society. 

New Haven (Conn.) Free 
Public Library. 

New Jersey Bureau of La- 
bor. 

New Jersey Commission of 
Public Roads. 

New South Wales Public Li- 
brary. 

New York City Public Li- 
brary. 

New York City (General So- 
ciety of Mechanics and 
Tradesmen. 

New York Free Circulating 
Library. 

New York State Charities Aid 
Association. 

New York State College of 
Forestry, Cornell Univer- 
sity. 

New York State Library. 

New York State Reforma- 
tory, Elmira. 

New York, University of the 
State of. 

Newark (N. J.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Niagara Falls Public Li- 
brary. 

Norton, John Pease, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Oaidand Enquirer. 



Oakland Tribune. 

Ohio Bureau of Labor. 

Ohio State University, Colum- 
bus. 

Oil, Copper and Finance. 

Omaha (Nebr.) Public Li- 
brary. 

Ontario Record. 

Open Court Publishing Ck>., 
Chicago. 

Oregon, University of. 

Osterhout Free Library, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Oxnard Ck>urler. 

Pacific Fruit World. 

Pacific Lumber Trade Jour- 
nal. 

Pacific Unitarian. 

Pacific Veteran. 

Paraguay, Director General 
de Imlgraclon. 

Pasadena Public Library. 

Pennsylvania Academy of 
Fine Arts, Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania College of Den- 
tal Surgery, Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania Prison Society, 
Philadelphia. 

Pennsylvania, University of. 

Peoria (111.) Public Library. 

Pet Stock Tribune. 

Peterborough (England) 

Public Library. 

Phelan, James D., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Philadelphia (Pa.) City In- 
stitute. 

Philadelphia (Pa.) Free Li- 
brary. 

PhiladelphTa (Pa.) Library 
Co. 



44 



L08 ANOVLBB PUBXJC UBKART 



PhillllpB Academy, Andover, 
Mass. 

PldlUpa Bzeter, Academy, 
Exeter, N. H. 

Phillips, Wiley J., Loa An- 
geles. 

Pickrell, Violetta, Los An- 
geles. 

Pomona College, Claremont 

Pomona Progress. 

Pomona Pablic Library. 

Pomona Review. 

Popular Mechanics. 

Portland (Oregon) Library 
Association. 

Portland (Maine) Public Li- 
brary. 

Portsmouth (N. H.) Free Li- 
brary. 

Pratt Institute Free Library, 
Bn>oklyn, N. Y. 

Press and Horticulturist. 

Princeton XJniyersity. 

Propagation of the Faith, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Providence (R. L) Public lA- 
brary. 

Public Policy. 

Railroad Record. 

Ratcliffe Place (Birming- 
ham, Bug.) Free Library. 

Reading (Pa.) Public U- 
brary. 

Redondo Breeze. 

Redlands Public Library. 

Reeves, Mrs. F., Los Angeles. 

Revista de Merida, Yucatan. 

Rice, Paran F., Los Angeles, 
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